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Full text of "College Catalog"

^TCHBURG STATE COLLEGE 



College 
Catalog 



•T 




i 




www.fsc.edu 




jTlTCHBURG STATE COLLEGE 

Undergraduate & Graduate 

Course Catalog 

2004-2005 



From the president 




o. 



"n behalj oj the entire college community, it is my 
pleasure to welcome you to Fitchburg State. For more 
than a century, this institution has provided ajjordable, 
high Quality educational opportunities to the people oj 
the Commonwealth. Today, the college is a 
comprehensive public institution with a long history oj 
growth and a clear record oj accomplishment. 

Since I earned my undergraduate and master's degrees 
here, I count myselj among the thousands whose lives 
have been changed by this caring academic community. 

Small classes, extensive internship opportunities, and 
an accessible, dedicated j acuity are the hallmarks oj a 
Fitchburg State education. Our j acuity is deeply 
involved in the success oj our students and committed to 
learning in its broadest sense. They are particularly 
adept at maintaining a link between the worlds oj 
scholarship and practical experience. 

The jocus here is on career-oriented learning jirmly 
grounded in the liberal arts and sciences. That means 
you won't leave here without a broad-based education 
that will stand as a jirm joundation jor a career orjor 
graduate school. Just ask. any oj our 30,000 alumni. 
They're working jor 8,600 employers in this state 
alone. They're CEOs and teachers, physicians and 
legislators, Hollywood producers and novelists. 

All oj us on campus are honored to play a role in 
creating the kind oj supportive environment thatjosters 
growth and discovery, which lie at the heart oj the 
learning endeavor. Take jull advantage oj all that we 
ojjer, and accept my personal wishes jor a rich and 
rewarding experience. 



^Jl^v.Ch^M^^ 



Dr. Robert V. Antonucci 
President 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Table of Contents 




About the College 4 

History of the College 4 

Mission 4 

Academic Calendar 2004-2005 

Undergraduate Day School 6 

Graduate and Continuing Education 7 

Our Commitment to You 9 

Institutional Accreditations, Approvals, 

Memberships, Affiliations 10 

Collegewide Policies 10 

Admissions 

Undergraduate Admissions 14 

Graduate Admissions 191 

Tuition and Fees 

Undergraduate Day Tuition and Fees 24 

Undergraduate Evening and Graduate 

Tuition and Fees 26 



Financial Aid 

Application Process 27 

Financial Aid for Undergraduate Students 27 

Financial Aid for Graduate Students 28 

Undergraduate Academic Policies and Procedures 35 

Undergraduate Day Division 40 

Undergraduate Evening Division 41 

Student Support Services 43 

Student Life: Beyond the Classroom 49 

New Student Orientation 49 

Campus Living 49 

Student Activities and Organizations 50 

Intercollegiate and Recreational Sports 5 1 

Student Code of Conduct and Discipline System . 5 3 

Campusand Facilities 54 

Curriculum 59 

Incoming Students: The Readiness Program 59 

Common Graduation Requirements 60 

Degrees Offered 6 1 

Program Alternatives 61 

Departmental Policies 63 

Undergraduate Day Programs 66 

Undergraduate Evening Programs 112 

Undergraduate Course Descriptions 120 

Graduate Division ; 190 

Mission 190 

Faculty 190 

Admissions 1 9 1 

Academic Policies and Procedures 193 

Graduate Program Descriptions 197 

Graduate Course Descriptions 240 

Faculty, Trustees, Administrators 284 

Academic Glossary 296 

Index 297 



About the College 







History of the College 

Established in 1894 by an act of the Massachusetts 
Legislature, the State Normal School in Fitchburg opened in 
temporary quarters in the old high school building on 
Academy Street. Principal John G. Thompson, aided by a 
teaching staff of three, implemented a two-year teacher 
training program for women that had forty-six participants. 
In December 1896, the school expanded into a new 
building, known as Thompson Hall, and set up the State 
Schools of Observation and Practice in city buildings on 
Day Street and Highland Avenue. 

In the next decade the school was a trendsetter for programs 
in Education. The Edgerly School opened, originally as an 
eighth-grade model and practice school. In 1910, it became 
one of the first junior high schools in the United States. 
The following year the school initiated the first practical 
arts teacher training course in the country for men. 

In 1930, the State Normal School was authorized to offer a 
bachelor's degree in practical arts, and in 1932, when it 
became the State Teachers College at Fitchburg, four-year 
degrees were offered in all areas of education. 

Under the auspices of the State Division of University 
Extension summer courses were first offered in 1915, 
marking the beginning of the college's commitment to 
Continuing Education programs. In 1935, the college was 
also authorized to establish graduate programs and in 1954 
the first evening courses were offered. 



In 1960, the college changed its name and expanded its 
mission. The State College at Fitchburg diversified its 
programs to include degrees in disciplines other than 
education. In 1965, its name was officially changed to 
Fitchburg State College, which today offers more than fifty 
undergraduate degrees in sixteen academic departments, 
thirty-two Master's Degree programs, six Certificate of 
Advanced Graduate Study programs, and eleven Graduate 
Certificate programs. Enrollment is up to 3,000 full-time 
and 4,000 part-time students which include 1,300 
matriculated graduate students. The campus has expanded 
from a single structure on High Street to thirty-three 
buildings on ninety acres, becoming the educational center 
for the Montachusett region. The college proudly offers 
traditional and non-traditional programs to serve the 
educational needs of its students as undergraduate, graduate, 
and continuing education students. 

State College Mission 
Statement 

There are six comprehensive state colleges — Bridgewater 
State College, Fitchburg State College, Framingham State 
College, Salem State College, Westfield State College and 
Worcester State College — and three specialized colleges — 
Massachusetts College of Art, Massachusetts College of 
Liberal Arts and Massachusetts Maritime Academy. All 
colleges integrate liberal arts and sciences programs with 
professional education, and the three specialized colleges 
also focus on academic areas identified in the college's 
name. 

Each college places a special emphasis on teaching and 
lifelong learning and promotes a campus life that fosters 
intellectual, social and ethical development. Committed to 
excellence in instruction and to providing responsive, 
innovative and educational programs of high quality, they 
seek to develop each student's critical thinking, quantitative, 
technological, oral and written communications skills and 
practical appreciation of the arts, sciences and humanities as 
they affect good citizenship and an improved quality of life. 
The state colleges provide a campus environment where the 
ideas, values, perspectives and contributions of all students 
are respected. 

Massachusetts state colleges are strategically located to 
facilitate access to baccalaureate and master's degree 
programs for Commonwealth residents who meet their high 
standards for admission. In recognition of their 
responsibilities to Massachusetts taxpayers to manage their 
resources efficiently and to maintain tuition and fees at a 
level as low as possible, each college has a distinctive 
academic focus based upon its established strengths and 
regional and state needs. Each college is a leader and 
resource for the community and contributes to the region's 
cultural, environmental and economic development. 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Mission 



Fitchburg State College is an institution of higher education 
that integrates an interdisciplinary, multicultural liberal arts 
and sciences core with all professional and arts and sciences 
majors. 

In the process, the college encourages the development of 
the whole person and prepares students for careers that meet 
the needs of their varied communities. Our faculty members 
are teacher-scholars who employ a variety of pedagogies 
and modes of technological instruction to further such goals 
for all. 

In 1997, the Board of Higher Education designated the 
college as the site of the Leadership Academy. The college 
emphasizes the importance of leadership studies, service 
learning, civic responsibilities, ethical development, and 
international education. Thus, it is this central theme that 
animates our mission statement: the establishment of a 
leadership honors program, extensive course work and 
extracurricular emphasis, and a commitment to exploring 
leadership for the twenty-first century. 

This comprehensive public college is committed to 
providing affordable, life-long learning opportunities in 
undergraduate, graduate, and continuing education. The 
College is extensively involved in promoting cultural and 
sound economic development, especially in the Northern 
Worcester County Area. 

Goals and Objectives 

Fitchburg State College's mission strives to: 

• Integrate high-quality professional programs with strong 
liberal arts and sciences studies 

• Promote, facilitate, and model self-reliant learning within 
a cooperative framework 

• Stress high standards of academic, professional, and 
societal performance 

• Provide opportunities for social and academic success to 
enhance self-esteem 

• Foster excellence in teaching, service, and research 

• Provide resources and services necessary to support the 
current and anticipated academic needs of the college 

• Promote an atmosphere of collegiality, openness to ideas, 
and esprit de corps 

• Support faculty and administrators with professional 
development opportunities 

• Respond in an affirmative and creative manner to the 
changing character of society 

• Develop a global perspective through international 
exchanges and programs 

• Meet social, economic, technological, and environmental 
changes 

• Support racial, cultural, and ethnic diversity in the college 
community 

• Maintain a healthy, safe, and aesthetic living and learning 
environment sensitive to local and global concerns 

• Establish a unique Leadership Academy curriculum for 
Honors students 



Fitchburg State College seeks to achieve its 
mission through: 

Mutually supportive strong Liberal Arts and Sciences 
professional majors: 

• Offering a liberal foundation that encourages 
multicultural and interdisciplinary courses 

• Focusing on modes of inquiry within each discipline to 
strengthen critical thinking skills 

• Providing extensive field experiences that bring together 
theory and practice 

• Integrating technological development across the 
curriculum 

• Educating students for leadership in the world community 
at both the undergraduate and graduate level through 
academic and experiential opportunities 

• Supporting undergraduate majors that complement 
graduate programs that, in turn, build on the strengths of 
the undergraduate offerings 

A student-centered environment: 

• Emphasizing creative teaching and active learning 

• Providing learning and leadership experiences where 
students come together to challenge one another's ideas 
in an environment of mutual respect 

• Responding to the intellectual, cultural, volunteer, social, 
physical, and recreational needs of the residential and 
commuting populations 

• Providing support for students, including an academic 
advising center, computer facilities, a freshmen readiness 
program, developmental skills and ESL programs, peer 
advising, career services, residence life, alumni services, 
tutorials, counseling, as well as health services 

• Offering appropriate services for students with physical 
and learning disabilities 

Commitment to the welfare of the larger community 
and region that it serves with: 

• Collaborative efforts with school districts, the health care 
community, social service agencies, the business 
community, and higher educational institutions, 
particularly community colleges 

• Programs for disadvantaged and gifted students, both 
outreach and on-campus 

• Cultural events and leadership activities that enrich the 
life of the community 

• Faculty, administration, and student participation in 
community programs 

• Tuition and fees that are within reach of people with 
moderate economic means 









Undergraduate Day School Academic Calendar 2004-2005 




Fall 2004 




Spring 2005 




September 

4 Saturday 


Residence halls open for all new students 


January 

14 Friday 


Conferring of Degrees for students who 




6 Monday 


Labor day — Residence halls open for all 




completed in December 






students 


16 Sunday 


College opens, Residence halls open for all 




7 Tuesday 


President's address to faculty 10:00 am 




students 






followed by department meetings and 


17 Monday 


Martin Luther King Day— NO CLASSES 






student advising 


1 8 Tuesday 


Departmental meetings and student advising 




8 Wednesday 


Classes begin 8:00 am 


19 Wednesday 


Classes begin 8:00 am 




1 5 Wednesday 


Final day to add or drop a course 


26 Wednesday 


Final day to add or drop a course 




October 










1 1 Monday 


Columbus Day— NO CLASSES 


February 

2 1 Monday 


U.S. Presidents' Day— NO CLASSES 




1 2 Tuesday 


Final day for making up Incomplete grades 
from previous semester 


22 Tuesday 


Final day for making up Incomplete grades 
from previous semester 




November 










1 1 Thursday 


Veterans' Day— NO CLASSES 


March 

1 1 Friday 


Spring vacation begins 4:30 pm 




24 Wednesday 


Final day for withdrawal from classes 
without penalty 


20 Sunday 


Spring vacation ends 




24 Wednesday Thanksgiving recess begins 4:45 pm 


April 






28 Sunday 


Thanksgiving recess ends 


1 2 Tuesday 


Final day for withdrawal from classes 
without penalty 




December 




18 Monday 


Patriots' Day— NO CLASSES 




16 Thursday 


Last day of Fall Semester classes 


2 1 Thursday 


Honors Convocation afternoon classes 




17-23 


Final Semester Examinations 




suspended at 1:30 pm 








May 

1 1 Wednesday Last day of Spring Semester classes 








12 Thursday 


Reading Day 








13-19 


Final Semester Examinations 








19 Thursday 


Residence Halls close 








21 Saturday 


Morning Commencement — 
Campus Quadrangle 








Calendar Subject to Change 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Graduate and Continuing Education Academic Calendar 
2004-2005 



Fall 2004 

July 

6-31 



12-31 



August 

1-24 



On-line Registration via the web 

Walk-in/Mail-in/Phone-in/Fax-in 
Registration for 2004 fall semester 

Sanders Administration Building 
9:00 am-7:00 pm Mon.-Thurs. 
9:00 am-4:00 pm Fri. 

To register by phone, call 978-665-3181 
(MasterCard, Discover and VISA ONLY) 
Fax number is 978-665-4151 



Registration (cont.) 



25 Late Registration begins. Registrations and 

course changes accepted prior to the second 
class meeting. (Class meeting defined as 2.5 
hours) 



September 



First day of classes 



October 

1 1 Columbus Day— NO CLASSES 



12 



Final date for making up Incomplete 
Grades from previous semester, (spring and 
summer 2004) 



November 

1 1 Veteran's Day— NO CLASSES 

24-28 Thanksgiving Holiday— NO CLASSES 

December 



23 



Last day of fall semester classes 



Winter Session 2005 

November 

15-30 Registration for winter session 

December 

11-23 Registration for winter session 

January 

3 Winter Session begins 



Spring 2005 

November 

15-30 
22-30 



December 

1-23 



January 

3-15 



19 

February 

21 

21-27 
22 



March 

11-20 



April 

18 
18-24 

May 

20 
21 



On-line Registration via the web 

Walk-in/Mail-in/Phone-in/Fax-in 
Registration for spring 2005 semester 



Walk-in/Mail-in/Phone-in/Fax-in 
Registration for spring 2005 semester 

Sanders Administration Building 
9:00 am-7:00 pm Mon.-Thurs. 
9:00 am-4:00 pm Fri. 



Spring Registration (cont.) 

Late Registration begins. Registrations and 
course changes accepted prior to the second 
class meeting. (Class meeting defined as 2.5 
hours) 

First day of classes 



U.S. Presidents' Day— NO CLASSES 

Vacation for off-campus sites only 

Final day for making up Incomplete Grades 
from previous semester, (fall 2004) 

Spring vacation — on-campus courses 

Patriot's Day— NO CLASSES 

Vacation period — off-campus sites ONLY 

Last day of spring semester classes. 

Morning Commencement — 
Campus Quadrangle 



16 



Winter session ends 



Calendar Subject to Change 



Graduate and Continuing Education Su mmer Session 2005 

■■■■■^■^^■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■^^ 



Summer Session l-May 31-June 30 
April 

On-Line Registration via the web 



11-30 
18-30 



May 

1-17 



30 
31 

June 

30 



Walk-in/Mail-in/Phone-in/Fax-in 
Registration for 2005 summer sessions I and 
II are accepted 

Sanders Administration Building, 
9:00 am-7:00 pm Mon.-Thurs.,- 
9:00 am-4:00 pm Fn. 

To register by phone, call 978-665-3181 
(MasterCard, Discover and VISA ONLY 
Charge must be over $50.00) 
Fax number is 978-665-4151 



Registration (cont.) 

Late Registration begins for summer session 
I. Registrations and course changes accepted 
prior to the second class meeting. (Class 
meeting defined as 2.5 hours) 

Memorial Day— NO CLASSES. 

First day of classes for summer session I. 

Final day of classes for summer session I. 



Summer Session ll-July 5-August 8 

April 

On-Line Registration via the web 



11-30 
18-30 



June 

1-21 
22 



July 

4 

5 

Aug. 



Walk-in/Mail-in/Phone-in/Fax-in 
Registration for 2005 summer sessions I and 
II are accepted 

Sanders Administration Building, 
9:00 am-7:00 pm Mon-Thurs., 
9:00 am-4:00 pm Fri. 

To register by phone, call 978-665-3181 
(MasterCard, Discover and VISA ONLY 
Charge must be over $50.00) 
Fax number is 978-665-4151 



Registration (cont.) 

Late Registration begins for summer session 
I. Registrations and course changes accepted 
prior to the second class meeting. (Class 
meeting defined as 2.5 hours) 



Independence Day — NO CLASSES. 
First day of classes for summer session II 

Final day of classes for summer session II 



Calendar Subject to Change 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Our Commitment to Yol 




Institutional Accreditations, 

Approvals, Memberships, 

and Affiliations 

Accreditations 

Fitchburg State College is accredited by the New England 
Association of Schools and Colleges, Inc.; the Commission 
on Collegiate Nursing Education, the International 
Assembly for Collegiate Business Education,- the Council for 
Standards in Human Service Education and the National 
Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education. 

The New England Association of Schools and Colleges is a 
non-governmental, nationally recognized organization 
whose affiliated institutions include elementary schools 
through collegiate institutions offering postgraduate 
instruction. 



Accreditation by the New England 
Association assures that the institution: 

• Meets or exceeds criteria for the assessment of 
institutional quality periodically applied through a peer 
group review process 

• Maintains the necessary resources to achieve its stated 
purposes through appropriate educational programs and 
gives reasonable evidence that it will continue to do so in 
the foreseeable future 

• Maintains its demonstrated institutional integrity 

Inquiries regarding the status of an institution's accreditation 
by the New England Association should be directed to the 
administrative staff at the college or to the Association at: 

Commission on Higher Education 

New England Association of Schools and Colleges 

The Sanborn House, 15 High Street 

Winchester, Massachusetts 01890 

617-729-6762 

Addresses for other accrediting agencies include: 

Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education 

One Dupont Circle, NW 

Suite 530 

Washington, DC 20036-6791 

202-887-6791 

International Assembly for Collegiate Business Education 

P.O. Box 252 17 

Overland Park, Kansas 66225 

913-631-3009 

Approvals 

• The Massachusetts Department of Education and the 
National Association of State Directors of Teacher 
Education and Certification 

• The Interstate Certification Compact in Certification of 
Educational Personnel 

• The State Board of Registration in Nursing 

• Board of Higher Education, Commonwealth Honors 
Program 



Institutional Memberships 

• American Association of Colleges of Teacher Education 

• The College Entrance Examination Board 

• The Massachusetts Association of Colleges of Nursing 
and the American Association of Colleges of Nursing 

• The American Association of State Colleges and 
Universities and the International Association of Colleges 
and Universities 

• The American Council on Education 

• The New England Association of College Admissions 
Counselors and the American Association of Collegiate 
Registrars and Admissions Officers 

• The Council of Colleges of Arts and Sciences 

• The Council of Graduate Schools 

• American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business and 
the Association of Collegiate Business Schools and 
Programs 

• University Continuing Education Association 

Affiliations 

McKay Campus School 

The McKay Campus Schools serves as the Teacher 
Education Center at Fitchburg State College, as well as a 
public elementary school for the city of Fitchburg. This dual 
mission adds a uniqueness to the teaching and learning 
atmosphere at McKay. This collaboration with higher 
education is a partnership that brings professionals together 
in our school setting to share: 

• responsibility for the preparation of new teachers 

• the professional development of experienced classroom 
teachers 

• the professional development of university faculty serving 
as teacher educators 

• the support of research directed at improvement of 
practice 

• enhanced student learning for our elementary students 

The McKay Campus School and Fitchburg State College 
have a shared understanding of and commitment to learning 
for children and adults. This culture of learning is one that 
values risk-taking, inquiry, reflection and collegiality. This 
community has children at its core and encompasses school 
and college faculty, parents and members of the wider 
community of Fitchburg and its surrounding towns. 

Servscemembers Opportunity College 

Fitchburg State College is a fully-approved SOC member. 
The SOC principles and criteria subscribed to by all 
member institutions provide the basis for a consistent and 
uniform approach to meeting the educational goals and 
special needs of military personnel. The Associate Registrar 
serves as the counselor for this important program. 



Collegewide Policies 



Affirmative Action Policy 

It is the policy and commitment of Fitchburg State College 
not to discriminate on the basis of race, religion, color, age, 
gender, sexual orientation, disability, veteran status, marital 
status, or national origin in its educational programs, 
activities, admissions, or employment policies, and to 
comply with the requirements of Federal Executive Orders 
11 246 and 1 1 375 as amended; the Civil Rights Act of 1964 
as amended,- Title IX of the Educational Act of 1972,- 
Sections 503 and 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, 
Section 402, Vietnam Era Veterans Readjustment Assistance 
Act of 1974; the Civil Rights Restoration Act of 1988,- 
Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990; the Civil Rights 
Act of 1991; and pertinent laws, regulations, and Executive 
Orders, directives of the Board of Higher Education of the 
Commonwealth of Mass., the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, and other applicable state and federal 
statutes. 

Inquiries concerning the application of, or compliance with, 
the laws and regulations prohibiting such discrimination 
should be addressed to: 

• Jane Coviello 

Director of Human Resources/Affirmative Action 
and designated Title IX Coordinator,- 
978-665-3172, or 

• Steven J. Lanciani at 978-665-31 18 
Vice President for Facilities Management 
and designated Coordinator for Section 504 
and the Americans with Disabilities Act ; or 

• Office of the Assistant Secretary of Civil Rights, 
United States Department of Education, Washington, 
DC. 

Sexual Harassment Policy 

It is against the policy of Fitchburg State College for any 
member of the college community, male or female, to 
sexually harass another employee or student. The college is 
committed to providing a working, living, and learning 
environment that is free from all forms of abusive, harassing, 
or coercive conduct. This policy seeks to protect the rights 
of all members of the College Community (faculty/ 
librarians, administrators, staff, and students) to be treated 
with respect and dignity. 

Sexual harassment consists of unsolicited verbal, non-verbal, 
and/or physical conduct, which has the effect of interfering 
with student or employment status or of creating an 
intimidating, hostile, or offensive environment. The 
college's Affirmative Action Grievance Procedures will serve 
as a system of review and resolution for both formal and 
informal complaints. Further information or advice may be 
obtained by contacting the Director of Human Resources/ 
Affirmative Action at 978-665-3172. 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Privacy and Confidentiality Regulations 

A Fair Information Practices Act (FIPA) administrator directs 
the Privacy and Confidentiality Regulations. Copies of the 
regulations as part of FIPA Chapter 766 (of the Acts of 
1965) are posted on bulletin boards at the college and kept 
on file at the Registrar's Office. 

Students should note that if any of these regulations should 
conflict with applicable provisions of the Federal Privacy 
Act of 1974 as amended, or with any regulations 
promulgated pursuant to said act, the provisions of said 
federal act or federal regulations shall control. 

Institutional Review Policy 

The college has established an Institutional Review Board 
and Policy which reviews and approves the adequacy of 
protection provided for human subjects serving as research 
subjects. The college is cognizant of its responsibility to 
protect the privacy, safety, health, and welfare of such 
subjects. A copy of this policy may be obtained in the 
Office of Academic Affairs and on the Grant Center 
website. 

Drug-Free Environment 

Fitchburg State College is in compliance with the Drug-Free 
Workplace Act of 1988 and the Drug-Free Schools and 
Communities Act, Amendment of 1989. Information 
regarding these acts and the College's compliance with 
them is distributed to the college community yearly and is 
also available from the Director of Human Resources. 

Alcohol Policy 

Fitchburg State College enforces all state laws and city 
ordinances regarding the possession, use, and sale of 
alcoholic beverages including those prohibiting drinking by 
individuals under 21 years of age. College policy restricts 
when, where, and how alcohol may be served and the 
amount of alcohol that a resident student may bring into the 
residence halls. 

The Fitchburg State College community recognizes the 
importance of personal and communal responsibility with 
regard to its alcoholic beverage policy. It assumes that any 
student who has consumed alcohol accepts responsibility for 
his/her consequent behavior. Being intoxicated will not be 
accepted as an excuse for erratic, irresponsible behavior 
either to individual or others' person or property. Any 
student found to be intoxicated will be considered in 
violation of the Alcohol Policy and will be subject to the 
Student Discipline System. 

Massachusetts law forbids the possession of, use, and sale of 
alcoholic beverages to persons under 21 years of age. The law 
also forbids falsifying age and identification cards. The 
college enforces the law and expects all students, faculty, 
administrators, and staff to abide by it. 

Use or possession of alcoholic beverages in public areas 
(campus grounds, athletic events, parking lots, academic 
buildings, dining hall, Campus Center) regardless of age, 
except at approved functions, is prohibited. Open 
containers of any alcoholic beverage is a violation of this 
policy. 

A complete copy of the Alcohol Policy is available in the 
Undergraduate Student Handbook or from the Office of 
Student and Academic Life. 



Substance Abuse Policy 

In accordance with the Drug-Free Schools and Communities 
Act, Fitchburg State College has adopted the following 
Substance Abuse Policy: 

Only in an environment free of substance abuse can the 
college fulfill its mission of developing the professional, 
social, cultural, and intellectual potential of each member 
of its community. The use of illicit drugs and alcohol 
impairs the safety and health of students and employees, 
inhibits personal and academic growth and undermines 
public confidence in the college. For these reasons, it is 
the policy of Fitchburg State College that all college 
activities and college property shall be free of the unlawful 
use of drugs and alcohol. 

Prohibited Conduct 

The students and employees of Fitchburg State College 
shall not unlawfully manufacture, distribute, dispense, 
possess, or use controlled substances or alcohol. Any 
individual who violates this prohibition will be subject to 
disciplinary action. Sanctions may include expulsion or 
firing from the college, mandatory participation in an 
alcohol/drug abuse assistance or rehabilitation program, as 
well as referral of the matter to law enforcement agencies for 
prosecution. 

Students and employees are required to notify the Director 
of Human Resources (and, in the case of students, the 
Director of Financial Aid) within five days of being 
convicted of violating a criminal drug statute in the 
workplace. 

A complete copy of the Substance Abuse Policy is available 
in the Undergraduate Student Handbook or from the Office 
of Student and Academic Life. 

No Smoking Policy 

Effective July 1, 1994, Fitchburg State College became a 
smoke-free environment. Smoking is not allowed inside any 
college building with the exception of designated bedrooms 
in residence halls. 

Those members of the college community who have special 
difficulties in complying with a smoke-free environment are 
urged to seek the assistance of either the Human Resources 
or the Health Services Office. 



Inclement Weather Policy 

Whenever inclement weather, usually in the form of snow 
and/or ice, makes driving conditions exceptionally 
hazardous, classes for that day will be canceled. In the event 
that day classes (on-campus and/or off-campus sites) are 
canceled, all evening classes and programs for that date are 
automatically canceled. Make up sessions are required. 

Cancellation announcements can be heard on: 



Notice of Availability 



Fitchburg 

Fitchburg/Worcester 
Winchendon 
Worcester 



WEIM (1280/AM) 

WXLO (104.5/FM) 

WINQ (97.7/FM) 

WTAG/WSRS (580/AM, 96. 1 /FM ) 

WBZ Storm Center( 1 030/AM; TV News 4)Boston 

WCAT (99.9/FM) Orange 

WCVB-TV5 Boston 

WRKO-7 News Boston 

WXPL 91. 3/FM FSC Campus Radio 

(after 8:00 am) 

or by calling 978-665-3006 (residence students), 
or 978-665-4003 (off-campus, commuter students.) 

The decision to cancel classes scheduled for weekends or 
holidays rests with the instructor. Students should consult 
with their instructor for his/her class cancellation and make 
up policy. 

Notice of Catalog Changes 

The rules, regulations, policies, fees and other charges, 
courses of study, and academic requirements that appear in 
this catalogue were in effect at the time of its publication. 
Like everything else in this catalogue, they are published for 
informational purposes only, and they do not constitute a 
contract between the College and any student, applicant for 
admissions or other person. 

Whether noted elsewhere in this catalogue or not, the 
College reserves the right to change, eliminate, and add to 
any existing (and to introduce additional) rules, 
regulations, policies, fees and other charges, courses of 
study and academic requirements. Whenever it does so, 
the College will give as much advance notice as it 
considers feasible or appropriate, but it reserves the right 
in all cases to do so without notice. 

Waiver of Academic Regulations 

The college acknowledges that extenuating circumstances 
relative to rules, regulations, and programs occasionally 
require a waiver of regulations. Although students may 
petition for a waiver, they should understand that the 
justification for a waiver should be as exceptional as the 
granting of one. 

Petitions for a waiver of regulations begin with the Dean of 
Curriculum and Instruction and /or Dean of Education. 

The provisions of this catalog are not to be regarded as an 
irrevocable contract between the College and its students. 



The Higher Education Amendments of 1998 clarified the 
information that colleges must disclose to current students. 
The following Notice of Availability describes the kinds of 
information available and where you can gain access to it. 
You may request a paper copy of any information referenced 
below by contacting the office listed. 

Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act 
(FERPA) 

DescriptionTERPA affords students certain rights with 
respect to the student's educational records. 

Location: www.jsc.edu/registrar 

Contact: Registrar 

Email — registrar@jsc.edu 
Phone— 978-665-3181 

FFEL/ Direct Loan Deferments 
for Performed Services 

DescriptionTFEL/Direct Loan deferments available for 
Peace Corps or volunteer service 

Location: www.jsc.edu/jinaid 

Contact: Director of Financial Aid 
Email — jinaid@jsc.edu 
Phone— (978) 665-3156 

Financial Assistance Available 

DescriptionTederal, state and institutional need-based and 
non-need based financial assistance available to 
students. Rights and responsibilities of financial 
aid recipients are also available. 

Location: www.jsc.edu/jinaid 

FSC Undergraduate and Graduate Course 
Catalog 

Contact: Director of Financial Aid 
Email — jinaid@jsc.edu 
Phone— 978-665-3156 

Cost of Attendance 

DescriptiomCost of attendance for undergraduate day 
students 

Location : www.jsc.edu/studentaccts 

Fitcbhurg State College Undergraduate and Graduate 
Course Catalog 

Contact: Student Accounts Manager 
Email — stuaccnts@jsc.edu 
Phone— 978-665-4126 

Cost of Attendance-GCE 

DescriptiomCost of attendance for undergraduate evening 
and graduate students 

Location: www.jsc.edu/gce 

Fitcbhurg State College Undergraduate and Graduate 
Course Catalog 

Contact: Assistant Dean of Craduate and Continuing 
Education 
Email — gce@jsc.edu 
Phone— 978-665-3182 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Return of Title IV Funds Refund Policy 

Description: Policy regarding recipients of federal Title IV 
financial aid that withdraw from the College 

Location: www.jsc.edu/jinaid 

FSC Undergraduate and Graduate Course 
Catalog 

Contact: Director of Financial Aid 
Email — jinaid@fsc.edu 
Phone— 978-665-3156 

Withdrawal Policy 

DescriptionTolicy regarding students enrolled at Fitchburg 
State College who officially withdraw from the 
College 

Location: FSC Undergraduate and Graduate Course 
Catalog 

Contact: Dean of Student and Academic Life 
Phone— 978-665-3130 

Academic Programs 

Description:lnformation regarding Fitchburg State College's 
academic programs 

Location: www.jsc.edu/academics 

FSC Undergraduate and Graduate Course 
Catalog 

Contact: Registrar 

Email — registrar@jsc.edu 
Phone— 978-665-3181 

Accreditation/ Approval/ Licensure 

DescriptiomEntities that accredit, license, or approve the 
College and its programs and procedures for 
reviewing Fitchburg State College's 
accreditation, licensing, or approval documents 

Location: www.jsc.edu/community/aboutus/jacts/ 
Contact: Vice President for Academic Affairs 
Phone— 978-665-3185 

Special Facilities and Services for Disabled 
Students 

DescriptiomSpecial services and facilities available for 
disabled students 

Location: www.fsc.edu/disability 

Contact: Director of Disability Services 
Phone— 978-665-3427 

Study Abroad 

DescriptionTederal Title IV financial aid eligibility for 

students enrolled in a Study Abroad program 

Location: www.fsc.edu/finaid 

Contact: Director of Financial Aid 
Email — finaid@fsc.edu 
Phone— 978-665-3156 



Completion/Graduation Rates 

DescriptionThe percent of first-time full-time freshmen 
who successfully complete a baccalaureate 
program at this college within six years. 

Location: www.fsc.edu/planning 

Contact: Director of Planning and Institutional Research 
Email — tcarroll@fsc.edu 
Phone— 978-665-3171 

Title II Institutional Report 

Description : Required annual report on the number of 
undergraduate and graduate students who 
complete the college's initial licensure 
programs, as well as additional information on 
the state of the college's education preparation 
program. 

Location: www.fsc.edu/edcert 

Contact: Dean of Education 

Phone— 978-665-3501 

Campus Security Report 

DescriptionThe Department of Public Safety/Campus 

Police Annual Security Report which includes 
required policies and procedures and crime 
statistics. 

Location: www.fsc.edu/campuspolice 

Contact: Director of Public Safety/Chief of Police 
Phone— 978-665-3110 

Report on Athletic Program Participation 
Rates and Financial Support Data 

DescriptiomData regarding athletic program participation 
rates of students at Fitchburg State College and 
related costs and revenues 

Location: Athletics Department 

Contact: Director of Athletics 
Email — slauder@fsc.edu 
Phone— 978-665-3314 



Admissions 




s, 



tudents who seek a quality education are invited to 
apply jor admission to Fitchburg State College. 
Fitchburg State welcomes applications from high school 
graduates, students returning to college after a hiatus, 
transfer students, and international students. After 
careful review of the application and supporting 
materials, admission is offered to students whose 
secondary school and/or college records and 
backgrounds offer the promise of a successful and 
satisfying undergraduate experience. 



Undergraduate Admissions 

Admission Standards 

Fitchburg State College is committed to providing 
excellent, accessible, and affordable life-long learning 
opportunities in undergraduate, graduate and continuing 
education. The college seeks students who are motivated to 
achieve academic excellence, and who represent a broad 
variety of backgrounds and interests. 

With the guiding principles of quality, access and diversity 
in mind, Fitchburg State has adopted admission standards 
which support the standards established by the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts. These standards provide 
a framework for the individual evaluation of each applicant 
to the college. 

Campus Visits 

The Admissions Staff encourages all applicants to visit the 
Fitchburg State College campus. A variety of visitation 
programs, including student guided tours, are available to 
people interested in learning more about the college and its 
programs. 

Interviews are not required, but can provide the Admissions 
Committee with helpful information. Applicants who desire 
to have an interview are invited to call the Admissions 
Office for an appointment. The college encourages students 
with disabilities to discuss their situations with an 
Admissions Counselor so that the college can better 
accommodate their needs. 



Admissions Office Hours 

Monday-Friday: 8:00 am to 5:00 pm 
Saturday: By appointment only. 

Student Guided Tours 

Monday-Friday at 1 1:30 am, and 2:30 pm. 

For information about open house programs, individual 
interviews, other visitation options and to receive 
admissions materials contact the Admissions Office at: 

Admissions Office 

Fitchburg State College 

1 60 Pearl Street 

Fitchburg, Massachusetts 01420-2697 

Telephone: 978-665-3144 

Email: admission5@fsc.edu 

Web Site: www.fsc.edu 






COLLEGE CATALOG 



Applications Filing Dates 

All materials should be submitted as early as possible. 
Recommended filing dates for the fall and spring semesters 
are listed below. After these dates, contact the Admissions 
Office to determine if applications are still being accepted. 
Applicants to the film, video, and nursing programs should 
contact the Admissions Office for information regarding 
earlier application deadlines. 

Fall Semester 

First Year Students: March 1 
Transfer Students: April 15 

Spring Semester 

First Year Students: December 1 

Transfer Students: December 1 

Fitchburg State College employs a "rolling admissions" 
policy. Rather than notify all applicants simultaneously, we 
do so on a continuing basis over a period of several months, 
beginning in the early part of December for September 
applicants. 

There are no deadlines for applications to evening 
programs, which are accepted year-round. 

Application Procedure 

Application Procedures- 
First-Time College Students 

To be considered for admission to the college, applicants 
must submit the following to the Office of Admissions: 



1 



A completed Application for Admissions and 
application fee. 

Official high school transcript including first-quarter 
senior year grades. Applicants who have completed a 
GED should also submit official tests. 

Secondary School Preparation 

Applicants are required to complete a minimum of 16 
col lege -preparatory units in the following disciplines: 

• English: 4 years 

• Mathematics: 3 years (includes: Algebra I, 
Algebra II, GeometryATrigonometry, or 
comparable coursework) 

• Science: 3 years (includes 2 years of laboratory 
science) 

• Social Science: 2 years (includes one year of U.S. 
History) 

• Foreign Language: 2 years (one language) 

• College Preparatory electives: 2 years (from the 
above disciplines, or from the Arts, Humanities or 
Sciences) 



Additional work in the math and sciences is strongly 
recommended, particularly for students intending to 
major in the sciences or nursing. 

If an applicant graduated from a high school that did 
not offer the required academic units and that high 
school has received a waiver from The Board of Higher 
Education, the applicant may substitute other college 
preparatory electives. 

Students submitting the GED must also submit a high 
school transcript reflecting work completed while 
attending high school. 

Scores from Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT), or the 
ACT* 

* Applicants with documented learning disabilities are 
exempt from taking any standardized college 
entrance aptitude test for admittance to any public 
institution in the Massachusetts (M.G.L. Chapter 
15A, Sec 30). 

A 300 word essay. 



5 



Letters of recommendation, while not required, are 
helpful in the evaluation process. 



6 A resume of activities if time has lapsed between the 
time of high school graduation and the application 
process to Fitchburg State College. 

Acceptance to Fitchburg State College is contingent upon 
graduation from high school or equivalent preparation 
(GED). Students who attend public high schools in 
Massachusetts and intend to enroll at Fitchburg State 
College must meet the state standards for the competency 
determination (measured by the MCAS tests or Performance 
Appeals Process in English language arts and mathematics) 
as well as local graduation requirements. 



Application Procedures- 
Special Admissions Applicants 

Applicants with documented learning disabilities or English 
as a Second Language (ESL) backgrounds, or who are 
graduating from vocational-technical schools may be 
eligible for application requirement exception allowances. 
These exceptions reflect the minimum admission standards 
as stated by the Massachusetts Board of Higher Education. 
Meeting minimum standards for admission does not 
guarantee admission for any applicant. 

1 English as a Second Language applicants must complete 
the 16 required college preparatory courses with two 
exceptions: a) ESL applicants may substitute up to two 
college preparatory electives for the two required 
foreign language courses, and b) ESL applicants may 
substitute up to two years of college preparatory ESL 
English courses for college preparatory English courses, 
provided they achieve a 2 1 3 on the computer-based 
TOEFL test or a 968 on the ELPT ESL students must 
meet all other admission standards for First-Time 
College Students, including SAT or ACT requirements. 



2 



Declaring a disability at the time of application and 
supplying complete documentation is voluntary. 
Applicants who present documentation supporting a 
professionally diagnosed learning disability are exempt 
from taking standardized college entrance aptitude tests 
for admittance to any public institution in the 
Commonwealth (M.G.I. Chapter 15A, Sec. 30). Such 
students, however, must complete the 16 required 
college preparatory courses with the following 
exception. An applicant may substitute two college 
preparatory electives for the two required foreign 
language courses if the applicant presents an Individual 
Education Plan (or the equivalent under Chapter 766 or 
Chapter 344) and the results of a psycho-educational 
evaluation completed within the past three years that 
provides a specific diagnosis of a learning disability and 
an inability to succeed in a foreign language. For a full 
description of documentation requirements, visit 
http://www.fac.edu/disability. 



3 Vocational-technical students must complete 16 
college preparatory courses, distributed in the same 
manner and with the same minimum grade point 
averages required of other high school graduates, 
with the following exceptions: a) Two vocational- 
technical courses may be used to fulfill the two 
required electives. b) Vocational-technical high 
school graduates who do not complete the two 
required college preparatory foreign language courses 
must complete an additional elective college 
preparatory course, for a total of three such courses, 
and satisfy one of the following: one Carnegie unit of 
a foreign language, a fourth Carnegie unit of 
mathematics or science, or one Carnegie unit of 
computer science. 

Meeting minimum standards for admission does not 
guarantee admission for any applicant. 



Application Procedures- 
International Students 

Fitchburg State College seeks a culturally diverse campus 
and welcomes applications from students from other 
countries. The deadlines for completed international 
applications are the same as deadlines for U.S. citizens. 
Students on F-l or J-l visas must study on a full-time basis 
and are not eligible for state or federal financial aid. 

In addition to the basic admissions requirements for new 
and transfer students, international students must submit 
and/or meet the additional requirements listed below: 

• Supplemental Application for Admission/Certificate of 
Finances (available at www.fsc.edu/intled.) 

• Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). This 
test is required of all international applicants with the 
exception of those who have earned a high school, 
associate's, bachelor's, or master's degree from an 
institution in the United States OR applicants from Great 
Britain, Ireland Australia, or Canada. The minimum 
passing test score is 550 (paper-based test) and 2 1 3 
(computer-based test). Official score results must be 
sent from the testing agency to the Graduate 
Admissions Office and must be dated within the past 
five years. For more information about the TOEFL test 
please visit http://www.toefl.org 

• Transcripts 

• The school accepts only official transcripts that are 
signed and stamped. 

(1/ the seal on the envelope is not intact, the transcript will NOT be 
accepted) 

• All international students must have their foreign 
transcripts evaluated. 

(For evaluation of your transcripts, go to the Center jor 
Educational Documentation website-. 
http://www.cedevaluations.com) 

• If your transcripts are not in English, they must be 
translated. 

(If you need to translate your transcripts to English, please go to 
the International Documentation Center website: 
http://www.eurasiacom.com) 

• F-l and J-l applicants only. If you plan to study at 
Fitchburg State College under an F-l or J-l visa status 
you must submit the appropriate financial 
documentation with your application for admission. 
Please refer to our web site at www.jsc.edu/intled for more 
details. 

• Supplemental Application for Admission/Certificate of 
Finances. (Available at www.jsc.edu/intled.) 

• Financial Verification Forms. Please visit www.jsc.edu/ 
intled for more details. 

• Photocopies of all previous l-20s (front and back). 

• Photocopies of your passport and visa, if you are 
currently in the United States. 

• Photocopy of 1-94 form (front and back), if you are 
currently in the United States. 

• If the student is transferring from another university or 
college in the United States, a Transfer Recommendation 
form must be completed. This form may be requested 
from the International Education Office. 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Application Procedures- 
Non-Traditional Students 

A non-traditional student is a student who does not enter 
college immediately after completing high school. 
Generally the student has experience in a career, at home, or 
in the military. 

Admissions requirements are similar to those of any new 
student; including: 

• High school transcript and/or GED 

• SAT or ACT scores* 

• Letters of recommendation 

• Resume of activities showing life experience 

* Waived if student has been out of high school for three 
or more years. 

Part-Time Non-Degree Seeking Students 

A non-degree seeking student is a high school graduate who 
is not applying for a degree program but wishes to enroll in 
college courses. These students may enroll in a maximum of 
three courses or 1 1 credits per term. Registration for non- 
degree seeking students is scheduled after the degree- 
seeking students have registered. Non-degree seeking 
students (those not enrolled in degree or certificate 
programs) may take courses for which they have fulfilled 
any specified prerequisites. 

Leadership Academy Honors Program 
Applicants 

The college encourages academically talented students to 
consider the college's honors program, The Leadership 
Academy. The Leadership Academy is characterized by the 
following: 

• A program for our academically strongest students with 
leadership potential or experience 

• Weaves themes of leadership into a separate core liberal 
arts and sciences curriculum 

• Collaborative teaching and learning model 

• Extensive co- and extra-curricular options 

• Emphasis/commitment to the community,- service learning 

Admission to the Leadership Academy is selective, based on 
several factors including: grade point average, SAT scores, 
and participation in honors and advanced placement 
courses. The selection committee also considers letters of 
recommendation, history of community service, 
extracurricular interests, and other activities that 
demonstrate leadership potential. A separate application is 
not required. 

Alternate Admission Programs 

The college supports alternate admission programs for 
students who either do not meet the admission criteria 
established for Massachusetts state colleges or have non- 
traditional backgrounds: The Fitchburg State College/ 
Mount Wachusett Community College Institute and the 
Summer Bridge Program. Both programs require students to 
submit the regular application for admission, no additional 
application is required. For more information on these 
programs, please contact the admissions office. 



The Fitchburg State College/Mount 
Wachusett Community College Institute 

The Institute is a collaborative program sponsored by Mount 
Wachusett Community College (MWCC) and Fitchburg 
State College (FSC) to serve the needs of a select group of 
students who demonstrate the potential to succeed at a four- 
year college but who currently do not meet the admission 
standards set forth by the Massachusetts Board of Higher 
Education. The Institute provides the opportunity for 
students to begin their college course work at Mount 
Wachusett Community College while living on the 
Fitchburg State College campus. At the conclusion of each 
semester, Fitchburg State College evaluates Institute 
students' MWCC transcripts,- if students meet the transfer 
requirements they are eligible to matriculate at Fitchburg 
State the next semester. 

Students enrolled in The Institute benefit from Fitchburg 
State College and Mount Wachusett Community College's 
long-standing tradition of collaboration, articulation 
agreements, close proximity to each other, a shared 
regional transportation system, and a commitment to 
support students' academic, co-curricular, and social 
development. Participants in the Institute are required to 
live on-campus. 

• On-campus housing at Fitchburg State College 

• Coordinated academic advising 

• Coordinated academic assessment 

• Coordinated orientation program 

• Access to selected student activities on both campuses 
(while students are enrolled at Mount Wachusett 
Community College they are not eligible for 
intercollegiate athletics or elected office in student 
government at Fitchburg State College) 

• Complete access to all student support services at both 
colleges. 

The Summer Bridge Program 

The Summer Bridge Program is designed provide 
educational opportunities for recent high school graduates 
who, for a variety of reasons, are considered at risk for 
academic success in college. The program provides 
supportive services and academic preparation for a select 
group of students who are conditionally accepted to the 
college. Students participate in a drive-in program that 
meets four-days a week for five weeks in July and August. 
The seven college credit program includes: 

• Literacy and Writing instruction based on entry 
placement testing. 

• Mathematics readiness instruction based on placement 
test performance. 

• Academic Transition seminars, activities and experiences 
regarding learning strategies, study skills, time 
management, tutoring and related topics. 

• The opportunity to complete one LA&S [general 
education] course. 

• Exposure and contact with the variety of Academic 
Support Services available at the college. 

Students who complete the Summer Bridge program with a 
minimum 2.0 grade point average and the recommendation 
of the Summer Bridge Coordinator will be fully admitted to 
the college in the fall term. 



Joint Admissions 

Students enrolled in Massachusetts community colleges 
may seek joint admission to Fitchburg State College. Such 
a student must complete an associates degree in an 
approved transfer program, which enables them to 
continue their education at Fitchburg State College. 
Requirements for joint admissions are: 

• Completed associate's degree with 2.5 average in an 
approved Transfer Program 

• Approval of the appropriate academic departments 

• Presentation of appropriate credentials 

Application Procedures-Transfer Students 

Transfer students who want to be considered for admission 
to the college must meet the following criteria: 

• Twelve or more semester units (eighteen quarter units) of 
college credit must be earned by planned entrance date. 

• A grade point average of 2.0 or better with 24 or more 
transferable credits from an accredited college or 
university or a 2.5 or better with 12 to 23 transferable 
credits. Having such an average, however, does not 
guarantee admission to the College. 

• If a prospective student has 23 or fewer transferable 
credits and a gpa below 2.5, the student's high school 
work must satisfy admission requirements for first-year 
students. 

The following credentials must be submitted: 

• An Application for Admission 

• Transcripts of all previous college work 

• A 300-word essay describing your educational goals and 
motivation to go to college 

• A final high school transcript or /GED 

Evaluation of Credit 

The amount of credit that will transfer into a Fitchburg 
State College program is determined after an applicant has 
been accepted to the college. Transfer credit is normally 
granted for courses completed at regionally accredited 
colleges and universities, for which the student received a 
2.0 (C) or better, and which correspond with those offered 
at Fitchburg State College. Courses which do not fit the 
degree program may be counted as fulfilling the free elective 
requirements of the four-year curriculum. 

Students transferring from two-year institutions will be 
entitled to a maximum of two years of credit (60 semester 
hours). Students transferring from baccalaureate level 
institutions may be entitled to more, but they may not 
transfer more than 50% of the total credit hours required in 
their major. They also must complete a minimum of forty- 
five credit hours in residence in order to receive a degree 
from Fitchburg State College. 

The grade point average from previously attended colleges 
and universities is dropped, and a new gpa is established, 
reflecting the student's performance while matriculating at 
Fitchburg State College. 

For some transfer students, the requirements and provisions 
of "The Commonwealth Transfer Compact" apply. The 
complete text of the "Compact" is printed following this 
section. 



The Commonwealth 

Transfer Compact 

January 1990 

For students transferring from Massachusetts community 
colleges to public colleges and universities offering the 
baccalaureate degree. 

Section i: Requirements 
for Transfer Compact Status 

A student shall be eligible for Transfer Compact status if he 
or she has met the following requirements: 

• Completed an Associate's degree with a minimum of 60 
credit hours exclusive of developmental course work 

• Achieved a cumulative grade point average of not less 
than 2.0 (in a 4.0 system) at the community college 
awarding the degree 

• Completed the following minimum general education 
core exclusive of developmental course work: 

English Composition/Writing 6 credit hours 

Behavioral and Social Sciences 9 credit hours 

Humanities and Fine Arts 9 credit hours 

Natural or Physical Sciences 8 credit hours 

Mathematics 3 credit hours 

The sending institution is responsible for identifying the 
transcript of each student who is a candidate for transfer 
under this compact. 

Section II: Credits to be Transferred 

The 35 credits in general education specified in Section I 
will be applied toward the fulfillment of the receiving 
institution's general education requirements. 

A minimum of 25 additional credits will be accepted as 
transfer credits by the receiving institution. These credits 
may be transferred as free electives, toward the receiving 
institution's additional general education requirements, 
toward the student's major, or any combination, as the 
receiving institution deems appropriate. 

Only college-level credits consistent with the standards set 
forth in the Undergraduate Experience recommendations 
are included under this Compact. Credits awarded by the 
sending institution through CLEP, challenge examinations, 
and other life-experience evaluations for course credit may 
be included when the community college certifies that a 
student qualifies under this Compact. 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Section III: Credits Beyond the Associate 
Degree 

To complete the baccalaureate degree, a student who 
transfers under this Compact may be required to take no 
more than 68 additional credits unless: 

• The student changes his or her program upon entering 
the receiving institution,- or 

• The combination of additional general education 
requirements, if any, and the requirements of the student's 
major at the receiving institution total more than 68 
credits 

Under these circumstances, transfer students will be subject 
to the same requirements as native students. (The term 
"native student" refers to students who began their 
undergraduate education at the baccalaureate institution.) 

Section IV: Admission to Competitive 
Majors or Programs 

If, because of space or fiscal limitations, the receiving 
institution does not admit all qualified applicants to a given 
major or program, the receiving institution will use the same 
criteria for applicants who are transfer students under this 
Compact as it does for its native students. 

Section V: Transfer Coordinating Committee 

A Transfer Coordinating Committee, convened by the 
Higher Education Coordinating Council of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, will monitor use of the 
Transfer Compact, resolve appeals as they pertain to the 
provisions in this document, and collect and analyze 
relevant data. 

Section VI: Publication of Requirements 

Each public college and university shall include in its official 
undergraduate catalog the provisions of the Commonwealth 
Transfer Compact. A transfer student may not be held to 
any degree requirements at the receiving institution that 
were established less than three years prior to transfer 
admission. 

Section VII: Transfer Records 

The student with Transfer Compact status will be provided 
(by the receiving institution) a list of courses to be fulfilled 
to earn a baccalaureate degree, no later than the end of the 
semester the student enrolls. With the agreement of the 
student, a copy will be provided to the Transfer Officer at 
the sending community college. 

Section VIII: Transfer Officer 

The President or Chancellor of each public institution of 
higher education will identify an individual who serves as 
that institution's Transfer Officer. The Transfer Officer's 
responsibility will be to assist students with transfer 
activities. 



Section IX: Student Appeals 

A student who believes that the provisions of this Compact 
have not been applied fairly to his/her transfer application 
has the right to appeal. 

Initially, differences of interpretation regarding the award of 
transfer credit shall be resolved between the student and the 
institution to which he/she is transferring. If a difference 
remains unresolved, the student shall present his/her 
evaluation of the situation to the institution from which the 
student is transferring. Representatives from the two 
institutions shall then have the opportunity to resolve the 
differences. 

Absent a satisfactory resolution, differences of interpretation 
may be presented to the Transfer Coordinating Committee. 

Section X: Effective Date 

The Commonwealth Transfer Compact takes effect January 
9, 1990. 

The Elementary Education 
Compact 

For students transferring from Massachusetts community 
colleges to public colleges and universities offering 
Elementary Education licensure at the baccalaureate level 
who agree to the compact. 

Section I. Requirement for Elementary 
Education Compact Status 

A student shall be eligible for Elementary Education 
Compact status if he or she has met the following 
requirements: 

• Completed an Associate degree with a minimum of 60 
credit hours exclusive of developmental coursework; 

• Achieved a minimum cumulative grade point average of 
not less than 2.75 (in a 4.0 system) (note: at their 
discretion, individual institutions may require a different 
grade point average); 

• Completed the following 44-59 credit core, exclusive of 
developmental coursework. The core is designed to meet 
the requirements of both the Commonwealth Transfer 
Compact, and the Department of Education's regulations 
(see Section 7.05: 1 b and Section 7. 06:7. b of the 
Regulations jor Educator Licensure and Preparation Program 
Approval ("Regulations").). 

Composition/Writing 6 credits 

*Humanities and Social Science (9 credits oj each) 1 8 credits 



In addition, students must select courses that meet the 
following Department of Education core content 
knowledge areas, bearing in mind that competency must 
be demonstrated in all these areas on the General 
Curriculum Test of the Massachusetts Test for Educator 
Licensure (MTEL). Students are required to complete 
coursework in these areas at both the lower and upper 
level, areas not covered by coursework at the community 
college will need to be completed after transfer. 
*Children's Literature 
American Literature 
World Literature 
British Literature 
US History, colonial to present 
World History, ancient to present 

(includes European History) 
Geography 
Economics 

US Government (including founding documents) 
*Physical Science with lah or Appropriate Integrated 

Laboratory Science (appropriate to the Elementary 
School curriculum) 4 credits 

*Biological Science with lab or Appropriate Integrated 

Laboratory Science (appropriate to the Elementary 
School curriculum) 4 credits 

*Matbematics (appropriate to the Elementary School 

curriculum) 6 credits 

Child Development 3 credits 

Exploring Teaching /Foundations oj Education 

with Pre-Practicum 3 credits 

Preparation courses for Academic Major after Transfer 
( these courses may also fulfill other core 
requirements listed above) 9-1 5 S.H. 

d. Achieved passing score on the Communication and 
Literacy Skills Test (CLST) of the MTEL. 

The sending institution is responsible for identifying the 
transcript of each student who is a candidate for transfer 
under this compact. 

• These course should be a course from the appropriate department and 
NOT be an education course. 

Section II: Credits to be Transferred 

Students fulfilling the requirements of the Elementary 
Education Compact are guaranteed a minimum of 60 
transfer credits, exclusive of developmental credit as defined 
by the Board of Higher Education, applied to their degree 
requirements at the State College or University. The credits 
will be applied as follows: 

• lower level arts and sciences coursework for the "Route 
One" requirements for the Initial Elementary Education 
Teacher License, 

• institutional general education requirements,- 

• academic major requirements,- 

• elementary education lower level requirements,- 

• free electives. 

Only college-level course credits consistent with the 
standards set forth in the Undergraduate Experience 
recommendations are included under this Compact. Credits 
awarded by the sending institution through CLEP, challenge 
examinations, and other life-experience evaluations for 
course credit will be included when the community college 
certifies that a student qualifies under this Compact. 



Section III: Credits Beyond the 
Associate Degree 

To complete the baccalaureate degree and receive 
Elementary Education licensure at the baccalaureate level, a 
student who transfers under this Compact may not be 
required to take more than 68 additional credits at the 
receiving institution unless the requirements of the student's 
academic major are such that the combination of additional 
requirements in arts and sciences coursework for the "Route 
One" requirements for the Initial Elementary Education 
Teacher License, institutional general education 
requirements, academic major requirements, and elementary 
education requirements total more than 68 credits. 

Under these circumstances, transfer students will be 
subject to the same requirements as native students. (The 
term "native students" refers to students who began their 
undergraduate education at the baccalaureate institution.) 

It is further understood that receiving institutions may 
require additional coursework if Department of Education 
licensure requirements change during the course of the 
associate degree. 

Section IV: Admission to Competitive 
Majors or Programs 

If because of space or fiscal limitations the receiving 
institution does not admit all qualified applicants to a given 
major or program, the receiving institution will use the same 
criteria for applicants who are transfer students under this 
Compact as it does for its native students. 

Section V: Elementary Education Transfer 
Coordinating Committee 

An Elementary Education Transfer Coordinating 
Committee, convened by the Board of Higher Education, 
will provide implementation and oversight of the 
Elementary Education Compact. The Coordinating 
Committee will consist of a total of eleven members: six 
members who are education faculty/administrators familiar 
with licensure regulations (two from the Community 
Colleges appointed by the Community College Executive 
Office, two from the State Colleges appointed by the State 
College Council of Presidents Office and two from the 
University appointed by the President's Office in 
consultation with the campuses), the three Joint Admissions 
Steering Committee co-chairs (one representing the 
Community Colleges, the State Colleges and the University 
campuses, respectively), and representatives from the 
Massachusetts Board of Higher Education and the 
Department of Education. 

The Coordinating Committee will monitor, evaluate and, 
when necessary, modify the administration of the 
Elementary Education Compact. In addition, the Committee 
should implement guidelines that are consistent across the 
system to address such issues as: professional development, 
student advising, preparation for the CLST of MTEL, and 
curriculum development. The Elementary Education 
Transfer Coordinating Committee will work to create a 
system for evaluating the effectiveness of this Compact, and 
will assist the campuses with developing courses that meet 
the Department of Education's core content knowledge 
areas. 



COLLEGE CATALOG 






Section VI: Publication of Requirements 

Each public college and university that accepts this policy 
shall include in its official undergraduate catalog the 
provisions of the Elementary Education Compact. Each 
campus agrees to use its best effort to provide participating 
Community College, State College or University campuses, 
respectively, with prompt notifications of changes in 
programs and curricula. 

Section VII: Transfer Records 

The student with Elementary Education Compact status will 
be furnished by the receiving institution a list of courses to 
be fulfilled to earn a bachelors degree no later than the end 
of the first semester at the receiving institution. 

Section VI II: Student Appeals 

A student who believes that the provisions of this Compact 
have not been applied fairly to his/her transfer application 
has the right to appeal. 

Initially, differences of interpretation regarding the award of 
transfer credit shall be resolved between the student and the 
institution. The student shall present his/her evaluation of 
the situation to the institution from which he/she is 
transferring. Representatives from the two institutions shall 
then have the opportunity to resolve the differences. 

Absent a satisfactory resolution, differences of interpretation 
may be presented to the Joint Admissions Agreement 
Subcommittee for Appeals. 

Section IX: Effective Date 

The Elementary Education Compact takes effect for 
students matriculating at participating Community Colleges 
beginning September 1, 2004. 



The Early Childhood Education 
Compact 

For students transferring from Massachusetts community 
colleges to public colleges and universities offering Early 
Childhood Education licensure at the baccalaureate level 
and who agree to the compact. 

Section I. Requirement for Early Childhood 
Education Compact Status 

A student shall be eligible for Early Childhood Education 
Compact status if he or she has met the following 
requirements: 

• Achieved a passing score on the Communication and 
Literacy Skills Test (CLST) of the Massachusetts Test for 
Educator Licensure (MTEL). (Note: This requirement 
may be completed after receipt of the associate degree). 

• Completed an associate degree with a minimum of 60 
credit hours exclusive of developmental coursework; 

• Achieved a minimum cumulative grade point average of 
not less than 2.75 (in a 4.0 system). (Note: at their 
discretion, individual institutions may require a different 
grade point average), 



• Completed the following 45-60 credit core curriculum, 
exclusive of developmental coursework. The core is 
designed to meet the requirements of the Commonwealth 
Transfer Compact, the Office of Child Care Services 
qualifications for professional child care workers (See 102 
CMR 7.07(2 1 ) of the Standards jor the Licensure or Approval oj 
Group Child Care Centers and School Age Child Care Programs), 
and the Department of Education's regulations for 
licensure as an Early Childhood Teacher. (See Section 
7.05 (1) and Section 7.06: (5) of the Regulations jor Educator 
Licensure and Preparation Program Approval). 

Composition/Writing 6 credits 

*Humanities and Social Science (9 credits oj each) 18 credits 
In addition, students should select courses from these 
areas that will help prepare them for the Subject Matter 
Test for Early Childhood Education of the Massachusetts 
Test for Educator Licensure (MTEL). Otherwise, they are 
unlikely to be able to meet the demands of the test and 
their baccalaureate degree in the 60-68 credits normally 
required upon transfer to a participating four-year 
institution. The topics listed below cover the humanities 
and social science topics that will be addressed in the 
subject matter test. 

*Children's Literature (Students not taking this course must 
take 2 oj thcourses listed under "3-6 credits" below.) 

History, Geography, Government, Economics 

The Arts, basic principles and concepts. (Studio and 

perjormance courses will not prepare students jor the 
MTEL) 

Early Childhood Growth and Development 

OR Child Psychology course (Birth to age 8 is 
required jor OCCS certijication.) (Ij course is ojjered 
by a Social Sciences department, it can be used to 
satisjy part oj the 9 credits oj Social Science required 
above) 3 S.H. 

Physical Science with lab or Appropriate Integrated 

Laboratory Science 4 S.H. 

Biological Science with lab or Appropriate Integrated 

Laboratory Science 4 S.H. 

Mathematics (Course should cover number sense and 
numeration^ geometry and measurement, patterns 
and junctions, ana data analysis.) 3 S.H. 

*This course should be a course jrom the appropriate department and 
NOT be an education course. 

Early Childhood Education courses (All course curricula 
must address issues, adaptations, and procedures jor 
children with diverse needs, including those with 
disabilities, those with limited English projiciency, 
and those who are gijted and talented. 12 S.H. 

Introduction to Early Childhood Education with Field 

Experience (Should include joundations and state 
and national jrameworks.) 3 S.H. 

Early Childhood Education Practicum, (Should be a 
capstone course oj at least 150 hours over a 
minimum oj 8 weeks in PreK-K education 
(includes preschool settings approved by OCCS) 
and be accompanied by a theoretical component 
that integrates the practicum experience with 
previous classroom learning.) 3-6 S.H. 



Choose 1-2 courses from the following list of topics: 
(Students who have not selected Children's Literature will 
need 2. See note below.) 3-6 credits 

Course Addressing Issues, Adaptations and Procedures for 
Children with Special Needs (Should include I.E.P 
preparation, implementation and evaluation. To 
qualify as OCCS "Children with special needs, 
birth- 1 6 years" course, the course must specifically 
address inclusion of children with special needs under 
age 3.) 

Early Childhood Curriculum* 

Program Planning* 

Behavior Management* 

Preparation courses for Academic Major after Transfer 
(liberal arts and sciences courses may also fulfill 
other core requirements listed above) 9-i5 credits 

or Additional Early Childhood Education courses provided 
they are transferable to specific institutions through 
separate articulation agreements or course 
equivalencies 

The sending institution is responsible for identifying on 
the transcript each student who is a candidate for transfer 
under this compact. 

• One of these courses, in addition to Child Growth and Development, is 

required for OCCS Lead Teacher Certification. 

Note: to qualify for OCCS Lead Teacher, students must have four courses in 
Early Childhood. One must be Child Development, which is required in 
this transfer compact program, and another must be selected from among 
the asterisked courses listed above. The Introduction to Early Childhood 
Education will count as the third, and Children's Literature can count as 
the fourth. Students who do not select Children's Literature as one of their 
humanities/social science courses will need to take two courses from the 
four listed above. 

Section II: Supplemental Material 

In order to facilitate the transfer process and to document 
their future eligibility for licensure, students are strongly 
urged to create and maintain portfolios of their associate 
degree work. Portfolios should include course syllabi, 
papers and other student-created products, with particular 
emphasis on products that provide evidence of meeting the 
content and professional standards for teacher licensure. 
(See the Regulations for Teacher Licensure, Section 7.06 (5) 
and 7.08.) 

Section III: Credits to be Transferred 

Students fulfilling the requirements of the Early Childhood 
Education Compact are guaranteed a minimum of 60 
transfer credits, exclusive of developmental credit as defined 
by the Board of Higher Education, applied to their degree 
requirements at the State College or University. The 
credits will be applied as follows: 

• institutional general education requirements,- 

• academic major requirements,- 

• Early Childhood Education requirements, 

• free electives. 

Only college-level course credits consistent with the 
standards set forth in the Undergraduate Experience 
recommendations are included under this Compact. Credits 
awarded by the sending institution through CLEP, challenge 
examinations, and other life-experience evaluations for 
course credit will be included when the community college 
certifies that a student qualifies under this Compact. 



Section IV: Credits Beyond the 
Associate Degree 

To complete the baccalaureate degree and receive Early 
Childhood Education licensure at the baccalaureate level, a 
student who transfers under this Compact may not be 
required to take more than 68 additional credits at the 
receiving institution unless the requirements of the student's 
academic major are such that: 

the combination of additional requirements in institutional 
general education requirements, academic major 
requirements, and Early Childhood Education requirements 
total more than 68 credits. 

Under these circumstances, transfer students will be subject 
to the same requirements as native students. (The term 
"native students" refers to students who began their 
undergraduate education at the baccalaureate institution.) 

It is further understood that receiving institutions may 
require additional coursework if Department of Education 
licensure requirements change during the course of the 
associate degree. 

Section V: Admission to Competitive Majors 
or Programs 

If because of space or fiscal limitations the receiving 
institution does not admit all qualified applicants to a given 
major or program, the receiving institution will use the same 
criteria for applicants who are transfer students under this 
Compact as it does for its native students. 

Section VI: Early Childhood Education 
Transfer Coordinating Committee 

An Early Childhood Education Transfer Coordinating 
Committee, convened by the Board of Higher Education, 
will provide implementation and oversight of the Early 
Childhood Education Compact. The Coordinating 
Committee will consist of a total of eleven members: six 
members who are education faculty/administrators familiar 
with licensure regulations (two from the Community 
Colleges appointed by the Community College Executive 
Office, two from the State Colleges appointed by the State 
College Council of Presidents Office and two from the 
University appointed by the President's Office in 
consultation with the campuses), the three Joint Admissions 
Steering Committee co-chairs (one representing the 
Community Colleges, the State Colleges and the University 
campuses, respectively),- and a representative from each of 
the following: the Massachusetts Board of Higher 
Education, the Office of Child Care Services, the 
Department of Education and child care providers. 

The Coordinating Committee will monitor, evaluate and, 
when necessary, modify the administration of the Early 
Childhood Education Compact. In addition, the 
Committee should implement guidelines that are 
consistent across the system to address such issues as: 
professional development, student advising, preparation 
for the CLST of MTEL, and curriculum development. The 
Early Childhood Education Transfer Coordinating 
Committee will work to create a system for evaluating the 
effectiveness of this Compact, and will assist the 
campuses with developing courses that meet the 
Department of Education's core content knowledge 
requirements and the Office For Child Care Services' 
professional child care requirements for certification. 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Section VII: Publication of Requirements 

Each public college and university that accepts this policy 
shall include in its official undergraduate catalog the 
provisions of the Early Childhood Education Compact. 
Each campus agrees to use its best effort to provide 
participating Community College, State College or 
University campuses, respectively, with prompt notifications 
of changes in programs and curricula. 

Section VIII: Transfer Records 

The student with Early Childhood Education Compact 
status will be furnished by the receiving institution a list of 
courses to be fulfilled to earn a bachelors degree no later 
than the end of the first semester at the receiving 
institution. 

Section IX: Student Appeals 

A student who believes that the provisions of this 
Compact have not been applied fairly to his/her transfer 
application has the right to appeal. 

Initially, differences of interpretation regarding the award of 
transfer credit shall be resolved between the student and the 
institution. The student shall present his/her evaluation of 
the situation to the institution from which he/she is 
transferring. Representatives from the two institutions shall 
then have the opportunity to resolve the differences. 

Absent a satisfactory resolution, differences of interpretation 
may be presented to the Joint Admissions Agreement 
Subcommittee for Appeals. 

Section X: Effective Date 

The Early Childhood Education Compact takes effect for 
students matriculating at participating Community Colleges 
beginning in the Fall Term of 2004. 



Air Force Reserve Officer 
Training Corps 

Fitchburg State College students may participate in Air 
Force Reserve Officer Training Corps (AFROTC) at 
Worcester Polytechnic Institute. Qualified U.S. citizens 
who earn their degree from Fitchburg State College and 
satisfactorily complete the AFROTC program requirements 
will be commissioned as second lieutenants in the United 
States Air Force. AFROTC offers a four-year and two-year 
program for qualified individuals to earn their commission. 
Two- and three- year scholarship opportunities are also 
available to qualified individuals in specific areas of 
academic study. For more details write the Department of 
Aerospace Studies, 100 Institute Rd., Worcester, 
Massachusetts 01609-2280, or call (508) 831-5747, or email 
at AFkOTC@wpi.edu or WPI.edu/campus/rotc.htlm. 




New England Regional 
Student Program 

This program enables residents of Connecticut, Maine, New 
Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont to be considered for 
admission to programs of study not offered by public 
colleges in their home states. Applicants selected under this 
program are granted reduced tuition rates (50% above 
regular in-state tuition, rather than full out-of-state tuition). 
For further information, please contact the Admissions 
Office or the New England Board of Higher Education, 45 
Temple Place, Boston, Massachusetts 021 1 1. 



Tuition and Fees 




Undergraduate Day Tuition 
and Fees 

The schedule of fees, tuition, methods of payment and 
refund policies are those in effect at the time of publication. 
They are subject to change without notice. Funds accrued 
for educational purposes are applied on a first funds 
received, first funds applied to bill basis. 

2004-2005 Tuition Rates 

• In-state students $970/year $485/semester 

• Out-of-state students.. $7,050/year $3,525/semester 

• New England Regional $l,455/year $727.50/semester 

Students aged 60 or over may enroll in classes tuition-free, 
provided seating is available after the registration of tuition- 
paying students. 



2004-2005 Standard Fees 

The fees listed below are on a per year basis and are payable 
in equal installments at the beginning of each semester, 
except where indicated. 

Application Fee, In-state $10 

(not refundable or applicable to tuition, one time only) 

Application Fee, Out-of-state $40 

(not refundable or applicable to tuition, one time only) 

College Fee $3,360 

Health Insurance (per annum) $1,206 

(required only if not covered by private insurance) 

MASSPIRG (optional) $14 

Student Activity Fee $90 

Capital Projects Fee $168 

Room and Board 

The college offers a variety of on-campus housing as 
described in the Student Life section of the catalog. Campus 
Living Residence Hall rates are as follows: 

Aubuchon Hall $l,835/semester $3,670/year 

Herlihy Hall $1,741 /semester $3,482/year 

Russell Towers $1,801 /semester $3,602/year 

Mara Village $l,790/semester $3,580/year 

Town Houses* $2, 361 /semester $4,722/year 

Cedar House $2,000/semester $4,000/year 

The above rates are for double occupancy in listed 
Residence Halls. Additional charges are added to the base 
rate for single occupancy as follows: 

Design Single $375/semester $750/year 

Premium Single $525/semester $l,050/year 

*single rate already included 

Residence Hall rates include cable television, internet access 
and telephone service (exclusive of long distance charges) in 
the stated room rate. 

Dining Services 

Whether you like to eat three times a day, or prefer a lighter 
daily diet, Fitchburg State has a meal plan to meet your 
needs. You can grab a quick bite between classes in our 
Commuter Cafe or enjoy a complete hot meal in our all- 
you-can-eat Holmes Dining Hall. 

Meal Plan 

19-Meal Plan 

• Any 19 meals/week 

• Three guest passes/week 

• $3.50 lunch exchange for the Commuter Cafe 
Monday-Friday till 4 pm 

• $75 in Falcon Dollars 

15-Meal Plan 

• Any 15 meals per week 

• $50 in Falcon Dollars 

• One guest pass/week 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



10-Meal Plan 

• Any 10 meals per week 

• $10 in Falcon Dollars 

5-Meal Plan 

• Any 5 meals per week for breakfast or lunch, Monday- 
Friday at Holmes Dining Hall 

• $15 Falcon Dollars 

Falcon Dollars can be used in the Commuter Cafe or in 
vending machines located in academic buildings and 
residence halls. 

Deposits 

The following advance deposits are nonrefundable: 

• Fee bill deposit $85 

(paid once at time of acceptance, 

credited toward first semester fee bill) 

• Housing Deposit $150 

The Housing Deposit is required of all students requesting 
on-campus accommodations. The Housing Deposit is paid 
one time and will remain current as long as an active 
housing contract is maintained consecutively. Upon 
successful completion of all housing contracts the deposit 
will be refunded less any outstanding charges. 

Payment Options 

Bills can be paid in the form of cash, cashier's checks, 
money orders, bank checks, traveler's checks, MasterCard, 
VISA, Discover, or personal checks. Fitchburg State College 
also has a tuition payment plan that is administered directly 
through the Tuition Management Services (TMS). 

Any payments that become past due immediately jeopardize 
the student's enrollment. Until debts are cleared, a student 
will not be permitted to register for a subsequent semester or 
summer session. Furthermore, the student may not be issued 
transcripts, or other official statements unless otherwise 
mandated by law. Any collection costs associated with the 
collection of this debt is the responsibility of the student. 
Additionally, the Treasurer's Office may refer an account to 
the State Attorney General or State Intercept program to 
recover any debt owed to Fitchburg State College. 

Please Note: A student will be charged $30 for any personal 
checks returned to the college by the bank. A late payment 
fee , not to exceed $50.00 will also be incurred. 

institutional Refund Poiicy 

The following Institutional Refund Policy is a reference for 
all students withdrawing from the College. The information 
below reflects the percentage of charges the student will be 
charged for dependant on the official effective week of 
withdrawal. If a student is using Financial Aid against your 
total charges, please refer to the Financial Aid return of Title 
IV refund policy. 

Enrollment Period 

The fall and spring terms are a 15-week schedule. The 50% 
point is up to the seventh week. The 60% point is up to the 
ninth week of school. 



Institutional Refund Poiicy 

Withdrawal prior to the start of classes 100% 

Before the beginning of the second week 100% 

From the second week but before the third week 50% 

From the third week but before the fourth week 50% 

From the fourth week but before the fifth week 25% 

From the fifth week but before the sixth week 25% 

From the sixth week but before the seventh week 25% 

From the seventh week but before the eighth week ... 25% 

From the eighth week but before the ninth week 0% 

From the ninth week but before the tenth week 0% 

Students who withdraw after the seventh week will have no 
adjustments to their charges. 

Dropping Courses Below Full-Time 

This is the refund policy proposed for all part-time students 
who drop state supported courses during the first three 
weeks of school. 

Dropping prior to the start of classes 100% 

Before the beginning of the second week 90% 

From the second week but before the third week 50% 

From the third week but before the fourth week 50% 

After the fourth week 0% 

Refund will only be generated if the total payments exceed 
total charges after adjustments have been generated. 

Health Insurance 

All matriculated students registering for nine or more 
semester hours must be enrolled in a student health 
insurance plan offered by the college or in a private health 
insurance program with comparable coverage. Students 
covered by insurance other than that offered by the college 
must sign a waiver card. If a waiver card is not signed, a 
student will be automatically billed the current health 
insurance rate a year for the college insurance plan. To 
obtain a brochure about the college sponsored insurance, 
please call 978-665-3130. 

Unpaid Charges 

If a student receives Title IV aid and has unpaid charges 
owed to the college, the college may automatically credit 
the refund to the student's account up to the amount owed 
by the student. 

* Based on policies in effect on May 8, 2004. All policies are subject to 
change. 




Undergraduate Evening and 
Graduate Tuition and Fees 

2004-2005 Tuition Rates 

The Graduate and Continuing Education tuition charges for 
all students are as follows: 

Undergraduate $1 10 per semester hour of credit 

Graduate $150 per semester hour of credit 

2004-2005 Standard Fees 

All students must pay the following fees: 

Application Fee (non-refundable), undergraduate $10 

Application Fee (non-refundable), graduate $25 

Application Fee for International Students $50 

(non-refundable) 

Educational Services Fee: 

Graduate $65 per credit 

Undergraduate $74.17 per credit 

Capital Projects Fee $7 per credit 

*Late registration fee $25 

Students auditing classes pay regular tuition and fees. 

*Nonrefundable unless a course is cancelled by the college. 

Payment Options 

Payment for tuition and fees must be made at time of 
registration in the form of cashier's check, money order, 
bank check, traveler's check, personal check, MasterCard, 
VISA, or Discover. 

Any payment that becomes past due immediately 
jeopardizes the student's enrollment. Until debts are cleared, 
a student is not permitted to register for a subsequent 
semester or be issued academic transcripts or other official 
statements unless otherwise mandated by law. 

Please note: All returned checks require a $30 returned 
check fee to cover charges by financial institutions. Students 
who do not respond to notification to rectify their account 
will have their account placed on hold and will be placed in 
the collection process. 

Tuition Waivers and Vouchers 

Some tuition waivers and/or vouchers may be used as partial 
payment for course(s) taken through Graduate and 
Continuing Education. When using waivers or vouchers, 
students need to register in-person or by mail. The 
appropriate original eligibility form with all required 
signatures must be presented at the time of registration. A 
tuition refund will not be issued if a waiver is presented 
after registration. It is important that students check with 
their own Human Resource Department to determine 
eligibility. Not all tuition waivers apply to non-state funded 
programs such as those offered through Graduate and 
Continuing Education. 

Tuition waivers, remissions, and vouchers do not apply to 
non-credit Life-long Learning courses, capstones, 
conferences, teleconferences, independent studies, directed 
studies, internship, practica, fieldwork, LECAP, selected 
distance learning courses, courses by arrangement or 
professional development seminars and lectures offered 
through the Office of Graduate and Continuing Education. 



Refund Policy 

The amount of a refund to a student depends on the official 
date of the student's withdrawal. The official date of 
withdrawal is the date when the Registrar's Office receives 
the completed withdrawal form. 

Refunds for courses designated "Special or 
Institute Scheduling": 

100% refund one week prior to the first class meeting 

50% refund less than one week prior to first class meeting 

No refund of tuition on the first day of class or thereafter 

If a course is canceled by the college, a student receives a 
full refund of tuition and fees. 

Class meeting is defined as 2.5 hours. 

Note: Independent and directed studies, internship, 
fieldwork, and practica are also considered to be special 
scheduling courses. 

Refunds 

Refunds are determined by the number of hours a class has 
met: 

Class hours 

Prior to the first class meeting 100% refunded 

Prior to second class meeting 90% refunded 

Prior to fourth class meeting 50% refunded 

No refunds issued after 4th class meeting 0% refunded 

Class meeting is defined as 2.5 hours. 

If a course is canceled by the college, a student receives a 
full refund of tuition and fees. 

Refunds for Federal Financial Aid 

Please refer to the Federal Title IV Policy section which 
appears in this catalog. 

Students Over Sixty Years of Age 

There is no tuition charge for students over 60 years of age 
enrolling in credit yielding graduate or undergraduate 
courses. They are welcome to enroll in any class, provided 
space is available after the registration of tuition paying 
students. Students over sixty years of age are responsible for 
paying fees. 

Health Insurance 

All matriculated undergraduate students registering for 9 or 
more semester hours, graduate students registering for 6.75 
credits or more, or graduate assistants registering for 6.0 
credits or more must be enrolled in a student health 
insurance plan offered by the college or in a private health 
insurance program with comparable coverage. Students 
covered by insurance other than that offered by the college 
must sign a waiver card. If a waiver card is not signed a 
student will be automatically billed for the college insurance 
plan. To obtain a brochure about the college sponsored 
insurance, please call 978-665-3130. 

Public Disclosure 

Fitchburg State College has copies of its most recent 
audited financial statement available in the Treasurer's 
Office. 

The schedule of fees, tuition, methods of payment and 
refund policies are those in effect at the time of publication. 
They are subject to change without notice. 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Financial Aid 




Application Process 



Financial aid funds are awarded on a first-come, first-served 
basis, according to demonstrated financial need. In order to 
receive priority consideration, students must file: 

• the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (*FAFSA) 
with the federal processor by March 1st 

• any additional information needed to complete an 
applicant's file as requested in writing by the Financial 
Aid Office 

Applications are accepted and processed after the priority 
date listed above. Late applications will be reviewed on a 
funds available basis. All applications must be made prior to 
the academic year in which the applicant will be attending 
college to ensure the availability of financial aid to put 
toward the fall semester's bill. 

*The FAFSA may be filed online at www.jajsa.ed.gov. On line 
processing increases accuracy and decreases processing 
time. Students without computer access may contact the 
Financial Aid Office for a paper FAFSA. Please allow 4-6 
weeks processing time for the paper application. 

Please remember that financial aid is not automatically 
renewed. It must be applied for each year. 



1 he 



he Financial Aid Office at Fitchburg State College 
is committed to providing an affordable education for 
every student admitted to the school. The college 
adheres to the basic premise that the student and family 
are primarily responsible for meeting college costs. 
Financial aid is available to assist with the educational 
expenses that remain after the family's resources have 
been taken into account. 



Financial Aid for 
Undergraduate Students 

Gift Aid 

Gift aid is usually in the form of grants or scholarships and 
does not need to be earned or repaid. The following gift aid 
programs are available to undergraduate students at 
Fitchburg State College: 

The Federal Pell Grant, is a federally funded entitlement 
program designed to assist undergraduate students who have 
exceptional need. Grants range from $400 to $4,050 per 
academic year. 

The Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity 
Grant (SEOG) is a federally funded program, which awards 
funds to undergraduate students with extreme financial need 
and who would otherwise be unable to attend a 
postsecondary institution. Average grants range from $500 
to $1,000 per academic year. 

MA State Grant is need-based grant aid administered by 
the Massachusetts Office of Student Financial Assistance 
(OSFA). Recipients must be enrolled full-time. Awards range 
from $300 to $1200 per academic year. 

MA Cash Grant is need based gift aid from Fitchburg State 
College funded by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
and awarded to undergraduate Massachusetts residents. 




Tuition Waiver is a state-funded program for Massachusetts 
residents. Applicants with demonstrated need can receive a 
reduction in tuition. Award amounts vary, but they cannot 
exceed the total tuition cost for which an undergraduate day 
student is billed. 

MA-Part-time Grant is awarded to part-time undergraduate 
students with demonstrated financial need. Awards average 
$500 per year. 

Special Fee Scholarship is awarded to full-time 
undergraduate day students who are not a resident of 
Massachusetts and who demonstrate financial need. Average 
award is $1,000 per year. 

FSC Fee Grant is awarded to Massachusetts residents with 
demonstrated financial need. 

Other State Grants 

Students from other states may be eligible to receive a grant 
or scholarship from their respective state. Each program has 
its own individual guidelines and deadlines. Students are 
urged to contact the appropriate agency in their state for 
further information. 

Financial Aid for Undergraduate 
and Graduate Students 

Student Loans 

Student loans are long-term, low-interest loans, which come 
due only after graduation, withdrawal from the college, or 
upon less than half-time enrollment. Student eligibility for 
these loans is based on financial need and availability of 
funds. To apply for the loans indicated below the FAFSA is 
required. Once students are awarded a loan or loans, 
additional paperwork is required. 

Federal Perkins Loan 

• Available for qualifying undergraduate and graduate 
students 

• Low-interest (5%) loan from the federal government and 
Fitchburg State College 

• Repayment begins nine months after the student either 
leaves school or drops below half-time status 

• Provisions for deferment, postponement, or cancellation 
are available for some specialized areas 

Nursing Student Loan 

• Assists students who are furthering their education in 
Nursing 

• Low-interest (5%) loan from the federal government and 
Fitchburg State College 

• Repayment begins nine months after a student leaves 
school or drops below half-time status 

For more information about repayment and deferment 
contact the Loan Collections Office, located in the 
Treasurer's Office. 

Massachusetts No-Interest Loan Program 

• Available to qualifying full-time undergraduate 
Massachusetts residents 

• Zero interest loan from the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts 



• Repayment begins six months after a student leaves 
school or drops below half-time status 

Federal Direct Student Loan Program 

Enables both undergraduate and graduate students with 
demonstrated financial need to apply for a loan through 
Fitchburg State College, instead of applying through a 
bank. If a student qualifies for a Subsidized Direct Loan: 

• The federal government pays the variable interest on the 
loan while the student is in school 

• Repayment begins six months after graduation, withdrawal 
from the school, or upon less than half-time enrollment 

An Unsubsidized Direct Loan is available to undergraduate 
and graduate students who do not demonstrate financial 
need or who are eligible to borrow additional funds beyond 
the subsidized loan: 

• Loan has the same low variable interest rate as the 
Subsidized Loan 

• Federal government does not make interest payments on 
behalf of the student 

• Interest on the loan accrues once the loan is made. The 
interest payments can be deferred or paid while the 
student is in school. 

For information on other educational loans, interest rates, 
eligibility standards, and requirements, applicants should 
contact the Financial Aid Office. 

Student Employment 

The college advocates 'earning while learning' as a 
supplement to the gift aid and loan components of a 
student's financial aid package. The current work programs 
include: 

Federal Work Study 

• Federally funded part-time employment on campus 

• Students are paid an hourly rate every two weeks for time 
worked 

• Work hours are available during the academic year, 
holidays, and the summer 

• Open positions are posted in the Financial Aid Office and 
on the Financial Aid website www.jsc.edu/jinaid. 

Fitchburg State College Employment 

• Part-time on-campus employment for a limited number of 
students 

• Students are paid an hourly rate every two weeks for time 
worked 

• Open positions are posted in the Financial Aid Office and 
on the Financial Aid website www.jsc.edu/jinaid 

Off-Campus Employment 

The Career Services Center, located on the third floor of 
the Hammond Building, provides listings of part-time 
positions from the local community. 

• Positions are posted on a bulletin board in the C-Lobby 
of the Hammond Building 

• Flexible hours are offered to accommodate academic 
commitments 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Eligibility for Financial Aid 

Determining Financial Need 

Although Fitchburg State College does not set the standards 
to measure financial need, the Financial Aid Office will help 
students and their families with the process of applying 
under Federal and State guidelines. No student should 
assume that he or she is ineligible for financial aid. All 
students, regardless of family income, are encouraged to 
apply. 

A student's financial need and financial aid eligibility is 
based on careful review of the information provided on the 
Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Financial 
need is based on the difference between expected 
educational costs and the family or student contribution 
toward those costs. 

Educational costs vary according to the individual 
circumstances of the student, and include such items as 
tuition, fees, room and board, books, supplies, 
transportation, and personal expenses. 

Family or student contribution is determined by the 
Federal formula known as Federal Methodology (FM), 
which factors in such items as income, assets, number in 
household, and number in college. As a result, the amount 
of family contribution may vary, even between households 
having approximately the same income. 

Student Financial Aid Budgets 

A student's financial aid budget is based on his or her cost of 
education, which includes both direct and indirect expenses. 

Direct expenses are paid by the student to the college, 
including tuition, fees, and room and board (for on-campus 
students). These expenses are set by the college and the 
Commonwealth. 

Indirect expenses are those over which the student has some 
control, including books, supplies, transportation, personal/ 
miscellaneous, and room and board (for off-campus 
students). These expenses are based on estimated costs for 
students at Fitchburg State College. 

A typical budget for a full-time 
undergraduate student living in a residence 
hall for the 2004-2005 school year is: 

Tuition $970 

Fees $3,618 

Room $3,482 

Board $2,280 

Books/Supplies $600 

Transportation $350 

Personal/Misc $1,500 

Total $12,800 

A typical budget for a half-time continuing 
education student for the 2004-2005 school 
year is below: 

Tuition $1,320 

Fees $974 

Room (off-campus) $2,700 

Board (off-campus) $2,280 

Books/Supplies $300 

Transportation $500 



Personal/Misc $1,500 

Total $9,574 

A typical budget for a graduate student 
carrying six credits each semester for the 
2004-2005 school year is: 

Tuition $1,800 

Fees $864 

Room (off-campus) $2,700 

Board (off-campus) $2,280 

Books/Supplies $300 

Transportation $500 

Personal/Misc $1,500 

Total $9,944 

Not all students will spend exactly these amounts. Budgets 
will vary depending on enrollment and housing status. 

Students are awarded financial aid based on their total 
budget. When the money for a student's financial aid is 
actually received at the college, it is first used to satisfy the 
student's direct expenses. Once a student's bill with the 
college is satisfied, the balance of his or her aid is available 
and may be used to satisfy any indirect expenses the student 
may have. 

Students should plan to start the semester with enough 
money for books and at least the first two month's rent (if 
living off campus). Financial aid refunds will not be available 
to cover these expenses. The Treasurer's Office will notify 
the student about which aid has been received, which aid 
has been used to satisfy their bill, and which aid (if any) is 
available for their use. 

Satisfactory Academic Progress 

Eligibility for continued financial aid for a returning student 
is based on need (as detailed above) and Satisfactory 
Academic Progress (SAP). SAP is the qualitative and 
quantitative measurement of progress toward the 
completion of a course of study according to the standards 
of the college. Students are solely responsible for 
maintaining their academic progress. Those who have not 
done so will be notified of their ineligibility for financial aid 
during the award letter process. 

SAP standards apply to all matriculated students. 

Qualitative measure: students must maintain an appropriate 
cumulative Grade Point Average according to the 
regulations listed below. 

To be in good academic standing, full-time undergraduate 
students must meet the following standards: 

• Freshmen (0-29 credits) must maintain an overall 
cumulative gpa of 1 .6 or higher at the end of two 
semesters. 

• Sophomores (30-59 credits) must maintain an overall 
cumulative gpa of 1.8 or higher. 

• Students with 60 credits or more must maintain a 2.0 cum 
to remain in good standing 

Quantitative measure: based on credits successfully 
completed during the academic year, which runs from fall 
through the following summer. 

• Full-time undergraduate students must successfully 
complete 20 credits during each academic year 




• Part-time undergraduate and all graduate students must 
successfully complete 67% of the number of attempted 
credits for each semester 

Students who have been denied financial aid because they 
were not making satisfactory academic progress may again 
receive aid the semester after attaining satisfactory academic 
progress. 

It is the responsibility of the student to officially notify the 
Financial Aid Office of any changes to their academic 
standing. Aid cannot be awarded until this official 
notification is received. 

Appeal Process 

Students have the right to appeal to have their financial aid 
reinstated under the following circumstances: 

• If extreme circumstances during the course of the 
academic year have impacted a student's academic 
progress, then a letter of appeal may be submitted to the 
Dean of Curriculum and Instruction. 

• If a student has not met the requirements but has 
demonstrated academic progress, a letter of appeal may 
be submitted to the Director of Financial Aid 

These appeals will be reviewed by the Dean of Curriculum 
and Instruction. If the Dean determines that the student is 
making significant academic progress, he or she may be 
granted a one-semester probationary period to make up 
course work. Winter and/or summer sessions may be used to 
make up credits or improve cumulative gpa's. 

Return of Title IV Funds 

Refund Policy for Students Who Receive Federal Financial 
Aid 

Applicability 

This refund policy applies to all full-time and part-time 
students enrolled at Fitchburg State College who are 
receiving Federal Title IV Financial Aid and withdraw from 
all classes. 

This policy is mandated by federal regulation. 

This policy deals only with the percentage of aid that is 
earned by a student. Charges incurred by a student who 
withdraws from the College are determined in accordance 
with the Institutional Refund Policy. 

Withdrawal Requirements 

All financial aid recipients that wish to withdraw from the 
College must do so by contacting the Financial Aid Office. 
The official date of withdrawal for this policy is the date 
that the student begins the official withdrawal process or 
the date that the student officially notifies the College of 
his or her intent to withdraw. 

Refund Policy 

Refund of Federal Title IV Financial Aid will be based on the 
date a student completely withdraws from the College as 
described above. During the first 60% of the semester a 
student earns Title IV funds in direct proportion to the 
length of time that he or she remained enrolled. A student 
who remains enrolled beyond the 60% point earns all aid 
for the semester. 



The percentage of the semester that a student remains 
enrolled is derived by dividing the number of days that a 
student remains in attendance by the number of days in a 
semester. Calendar days are used, but breaks of at least 5 
consecutive days are excluded from both the numerator and 
denominator. 

Unearned Federal Title IV Aid other than Federal Work 
Study must be repaid by the student in the following order: 

Federal Unsubsidized Direct Loan 

Federal Subsidized Direct Loan 

Federal Perkins Loan 

Federal Parent (PLUS) Loan 

Federal Pell Grant 

Federal SEOG 

Other Title IV Financial Aid 

Students must repay 100% of unearned loans according to 
the terms of their Promissory Note. 50% of unearned grants 
must be repaid within 30 days of withdrawal from the 
College. 

An example of the Return of Title IV Funds Policy is 
available in the Financial Aid Office. 

It is very possible that a student who receives federal 
financial aid and withdraws from the College will owe a 
balance to the Fitchburg State College Student Accounts 
Office and may be required to repay funds to the U.S. 
Department of Education. Students considering withdrawal 
from Fitchburg State College are advised to contact the 
Financial Aid Office. 

Correspondence 

The Financial Aid Office corresponds with Fitchburg State 
College students via mail and email. Mail will be sent to a 
student's permanent address during the summer and to their 
campus mailbox, if applicable, during the school year. Email 
will be sent to a student's jsc.edu email address throughout 
the year. It is the student's responsibility to monitor their 
email and mailbox accounts. 

Aid for Veterans 

U.S. Veterans are entitled to certain financial aid benefits at 
Fitchburg State College for undergraduate degree programs. 
While all veterans are urged to keep informed about benefits 
available to them through the Veterans' Administration, 
they should contact the Registrar's Office to establish 
eligibility for such benefits. The Registrar's Office will 
provide the veteran with an Application for Benefits or the 
Change of Place of Training Form, whichever is applicable. 
Along with an application, the veteran needs to provide the 
following documents for the Registrar's Office: 

• a DD214 Form notarized by a Veteran Notary 

• his or her marriage certificate 

• birth certificates for each dependent child 

All veterans, whether or not exempt from paying tuition, 
must pay all fees. 

For more information on Veterans' Education benefits write 

tO: 

Regional Office 

Department of Veteran Affairs 

JFK Federal Building, Government Center 

Boston, Massachusetts 02203 



COLLEGE CATALOG 






Some Vietnam and Desert Storm veterans from 
Massachusetts are entitled to attend Fitchburg State College 
on a no-tuition basis. 

Additional information may be obtained from: 

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Department of Education 
1385 Hancock Street 
Quincy, Massachusetts 02169 

Or, call the hot line at 1-800-827-1000. 

Scholarships for 
Underg raduate Students 

In addition to the gift aid programs already listed, Fitchburg 
State College has numerous scholarships of its own. These 
scholarships are administered by the College Scholarship 
Committee or by the appropriate area representative. To 
assist in the evaluation of need, a Scholarship Application or 
a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) may be 
required. Scholarship applications are available in the 
Financial Aid Office after January 1st. Completed 
applications must be received in the Financial Aid Office no 
later than March 1st. 

Alumni Legacy Scholarships are available to full-time 
students who have a parent, grandparent, spouse, sibling or 
dependent who is a Fitchburg State College alumnus/a. 
Priority is based on academic excellence and/or financial 
need. 

Vincent J. Mara Scholarship is available to full-time 
students currently enrolled at Fitchburg State College, who 
are demonstrating academic excellence with a gpa of 3.5 or 
above. Community service or extracurricular activities are 
considered, but not required for application. A letter of 
recommendation from a member of the faculty is preferred. 

City Year Scholarship is awarded every four years to a 
graduate of the Boston City Year Program. For information 
contact the Financial Aid Office. 

Dean's Undergraduate Scholarship is awarded annually to 
an undergraduate matriculated honor student(s) who is 
pursuing a bachelor's degree by attending evenings. 

Departmental Scholarships offer a unique opportunity for 
upperclass students to work closely with the departmental 
chair in their discipline. High consideration is given to 
those students with a record of academic excellence and 
previous departmental service. Financial need is not a 
requirement for consideration and award decisions are made 
through each specific department. 

The President's Scholars Awards are available to 
undergraduate students who have completed a minimum of 
15 semester hours at the college and have achieved a grade 
point average of at least 3.75. 

Sterilite Corporation Scholarship is awarded to a student 
who demonstrates financial need. 

Student Government Association Scholarship are available 
to sophomores, juniors, and seniors with a grade point 
average of 2.2 or higher and a record of student leadership. 



Senator Paul E. Tsongas Scholarship Program is awarded 

to entering students who are high achievers and 

Massachusetts' residents. The scholarship is in the amount 

of tuition and fees and is renewable with a 3.3 grade point 

average. 

VNA (Visiting Nurses Association) Trust Scholarship is 

awarded to a Nursing major by the Nursing Department. 

Class of 1942 Scholarship is awarded to a full-time, upper- 
class student who has maintained a 3.0 gpa and has a record 
of demonstrated leadership in college activities. 

Class of 1 953 Scholarship is awarded to a full-time, junior 
year students who possesses a 3.0 gpa, and demonstrates 
financial need. The recipient should participate in class 
activities, support the college and be working toward a 
career in education. 

Class of 1955 Scholarship is available annually to a full- 
time student of Fitchburg State College. 

Class of 1967 Scholarship is available annually to an 
Fitchburg State College student chosen on the basis of 
academic merit and financial need. 

Freshman Merit Programs 

Fitchburg State College offers several scholarships for 
incoming freshmen who have demonstrated a high level of 
achievement in high school and the potential to contribute 
to the academic and cultural community of Fitchburg State. 
Award amounts range from $500 to full tuition. For further 
information, please contact the Admissions Office. 

Transfer Merit Programs 

Fitchburg State College offers several scholarships for 
incoming transfer students who have demonstrated a high 
level of achievement in college-level work and the potential 
to contribute to the academic and cultural community of 
Fitchburg State. Award amounts range from $500 to full 
tuition. For further information, please contact the 
Admissions Office. 

Fitchburg State College Scholarships and 
Awards Named in Grateful Recognition of 
their Benefactors 

Ken and Cherie Ansin '96 Scholarship is awarded to a non- 
traditional Human Services undergraduate student. 

Matti N. Antila Poetry Award is awarded annually to a 
junior for a poetry composition. The award is made possible 
by Lauri and Signe Sipila in memory of Signe Sipila's parents, 
Matti N. and Fanny P. Antila. 

W.E. Aubuchon, Jr. Scholarship, is awarded to a Fitchburg 
State College student selected by the Financial Aid 
Department 

Leo J. Bourque Memorial Scholarship is awarded to a full- 
time undergraduate, who is at least a three-year resident of 
Leominster and who demonstrates financial need. 

Charlotte B. Bonjukian Memorial Fund Scholarship is 

awarded to a non-traditional upper-class nursing student. 

Mary F. Burnham and Mary Frances Burnham Scholarship 
Fund is available to full-time undergraduate students who 
have completed at least one semester at Fitchburg State. 
Students must be currently working to support their 
education. Those who demonstrate financial need preferred. 




Stephen W. Clair Memorial Scholarship is awarded to a 
student with financial need who is a Geography/Earth 
Science major, has earned at least 30 credits, has at least a 
3.0 gpa, and is an active member of the Geo Club. 

William E. Clark III Memorial Scholarship is awarded to a 
student who evinces academic achievement, financial need, 
and the potential to succeed. 

Roberta A. Fitzmaurice Connors '63 Scholarship is 

awarded to a full-time student in the early childhood 
education program who demonstrates the ability to be an 
outstanding early childhood educator. 

Garrett Conrad Scholarship is awarded annually to a 
student with a disability. Applicants must be registered with 
Disability Services, qualify under ADA, enrolled for at least 
six credits each semester, and have completed at least one 
semester at Fitchburg State College. Preference is given to 
students with an outstanding record of service and 
commitment to the college and community. 

The Elaine T. Coyne Women in Film Scholarship is 

available to a female student under criteria established by 
the Communications/ Media department. 

A. Wallace Cunningham '43 Memorial Scholarship is 
awarded to a student with a demonstrated financial need 
and whose academic record proves high achievement. 

Carol Mulloy Cuttle Scholarship is awarded to a Fitchburg 
area sophomore, junior, or senior in the special education 
department who demonstrates financial need. 

Dean's Undergraduate Award is awarded to an evening 
undergraduate degree student who has completed at least 80 
credits with a gpa of 3.5 or better. 

Dr. Edward T. Donnelly Scholarship is available annually 
to a full-time undergraduate student with a teacher 
education major or minor and a demonstrated financial 
need. 

Ethel P. Mandrus Donohue '4 1 Endowed Scholarship is 

awarded to a first-year student from Hampden County who 
will major in special education. Additional selection criteria 
include a minimum grade point average minimum of 3.0 and 
demonstrate school and community participation. 

Henry Frank Scholarship is awarded to full-time entering 
freshmen and transfer students from Norwalk, Connecticut, 
or from within a fifteen-mile radius of Orange, 
Massachusetts. Preference is given to the former and 
selection is based on academic achievement. 

Fitchburg Mutual Insurance Company W Bruce Adams 
Scholarship is available annually to a graduate of a public 
high school in one of the following towns: Ashburnham, 
Ashby, Fitchburg, Leominster, Lunenburg, or Westminster, 
who meets income (adjusted gross income $40,000- 
$60,000) and academic (3 pt. average or better on a four pt. 
scale) criteria. 

Amelia V. Gallucci-Cirio '38 Scholarship is awarded to 
students, teachers and faculty who demonstrate exceptional 
academic credentials and have an interest in learning more 
about Italian language, Italian culture and Western 
Civilization. This is a travel/study grant for use as course 
payment at an accredited school or college, book purchases 
and cultural event admissions in pursuit of the above. 
Awarded by the Fitchburg State College Center for Italian 
Culture. 



Grace Gummo Nursing Scholarship is awarded to 
deserving students in the Nursing Program. 

Patrick and Mary Hammond Band Scholarship is awarded 
to a full-time undergraduate student chosen as the 
outstanding member of the Fitchburg State College Band. 

The Patricia A. Hess '94 Memorial Scholarship is awarded 
annually to a female, non-traditional student who has been 
out of high school for at least ten years. The recipient must 
be an undergraduate English and/or History major with a 
minimum of 3.0 gpa and 30 credit hours and demonstrates a 
love of learning and will be based upon merit. Awarded by 
the Financial Aid Committee with the recommendation of 
the Social Science Department faculty. 

The Walter F. Harrod '40 Scholarship is awarded as a one- 
year renewable scholarship when supported by sustained 
academic performance and evidence of good character. The 
recipient must be a junior industrial technology major with 
a minimum 2.8 gpa and who has earned at least 90 credit 
hours and demonstrates the desire and capacity to enter the 
professional field within industrial technology. Financial 
need may be used in awarding the scholarship and will be 
awarded by the Financial Aid Committee with the 
recommendation of the Industrial Technology Department. 

Walter Harrod Community Service Scholarship is awarded 
to an Industrial Technology major who demonstrates 
community service commitment. 

Leo J. Hines Memorial Scholarship is awarded to a 
qualified English major demonstrating academic excellence. 

Jeanne M. Joyal '53 Endowed Scholarship provides 
scholarship assistance to a resident of Western 
Massachusetts who will be a first-year student and major in 
elementary education. The recipient must possess a 
minimum of 3.0 gpa in high school and demonstrate school 
and community participation. 

Kirkpatrick-Percival Scholarship is awarded to an 
outstanding senior Psychology major. 

Jacqueline LaCoy Scholarship offers the opportunity for 
returning communications/media students to work closely 
with television production faculty. Priority is given to 
students with a record of television production excellence, 
previous departmental service, and an interest in teaching 
television production. 

LeBlond-O'Sullivan Memorial Scholarship is awarded to 
full-time juniors or seniors with financial need and a record 
of service to the college. 

Ruth Lee Scholarship is available annually to a student 
from the North Central Massachusetts Region, (one of the 
cities and towns included in the North Central Mass. 
Chamber of Commerce membership), on the basis of 
academic merit. 

Francis Marcille '60 Memorial Award is awarded to a 
graduating senior Industrial Technology major who intends 
to teach in a Massachusetts school. 

Eunice J. Mattson Scholarship is awarded by the Special 
Education Department to a full-time junior or senior student 
who is majoring in Special Education and demonstrates an 
enthusiasm for working with the handicapped. It is awarded 
on the basis of community involvement, leadership, 
scholarship financial need and a narrative statement. 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Anna G. Mazzaferro '77 Opportunity Fund is awarded 
to an Fitchburg State College student or faculty member 
who demonstrates a need for financial support to advance 
their academic or scholarly work, such as presentation of a 
paper, assistance with publishing a body of work, 
completing a major thesis or honors work. The Fitchburg 
State College Foundation, in conjunction with the VP for 
Academic Affairs, selects the recipient. 

Dr. Robert F. McGuire Memorial Award is awarded to an 
undergraduate and a graduate student annually from the 
computer science department. 

Myra McGuirk-Bonitz '14, G'52 Scholarship is available 
annually to an undergraduate student graduating from a 
high school within the Fitchburg city limits who has chosen 
education as a major field of study. 

Buddy McMurray Good Fellowship Award is given to a 
student whose contribution to the college is positive, 
salutary, and inspirational, as well as indicative of the goals 
he or she set by entering Fitchburg State. 

John McNaney Memorial Scholarship is available to an 
outstanding Chemistry major. 

Dorothy Meilinger Memorial Scholarship is awarded to 
seniors majoring in Special Education, who have a grade 
point average of 3.5 or above and a demonstrated financial 
need. 

Annette Rose Mitchell Scholarship Fund is awarded to a 
senior Nursing student who has maintained a 3.0 gpa for 
three years. 

Flora D. Mulholland Memorial Scholarship is awarded to a 
Nursing major evincing high scholastic achievement and a 
demonstrated financial need. 

Kevin L. Mumper Memorial Scholarship is awarded to a 
student who is a member of the Student Government 
Association. 

Murnane-Rheault-Crowley Scholarship is awarded to a full- 
time junior or senior year student who is majoring in 
Mathematics or Industrial Technology and who 
demonstrates financial need. 

Dr. Helen O'Flaherty Scholarship, in honor of a former 
professor, is awarded annually to a student majoring in Early 
Childhood Education who demonstrates financial need. 
Membership in a minority group will confer preference. The 
prior year recipient will automatically receive the award if 
he or she maintains satisfactory academic progress under 
college policies. 

Kathleen Mary O'Neil Scholarship is awarded to a full-time 
female undergraduate student who is a citizen of the United 
States and has a class rank in the upper 50th percentile. 

The Owens-Mara Award is available to an elementary 
education major completing junior level work during the 
spring semester and selected by the education department 
based upon promise as a future elementary leader. 

Dr. Frank Patterson Memorial Music Award is awarded to a 
member of the Fitchburg State College instrumental 
ensembles for private lesson instruction at the Indian Hill 
Music Center. 



Dr. A.J. Polito '48 '49 and Family Memorial Trust is in 
honor of Fitchburg State College veterans and Fitchburg 
State College faculty members who have served the 
institution. It is awarded to a relative or friend of a Fitchburg 
State College veteran,- to a relative or friend of a faculty 
member, and to a relative or friend in the Center for Italian 
Culture Program. 

John L. Powers Memorial Scholarship is awarded to an 
Industrial Technology major who has maintained at least a 
2.0 gpa and demonstrates financial need. 

Clifford Querolo Scholarship is awarded to a student in the 
Industrial Technology Program or to a student who intends 
to teach industrial, vocational, or occupational education. 

Dean Rachupka '93 Memorial Scholarship is awarded to a 
Senior majoring in education from North Central 
Massachusetts who is active in his/her community and has a 
gpa of 3.0 or higher. 

Michael P. and Barbara Riccards Scholarship is available 
annually to an undergraduate student on the basis of 
financial need and academic record. 

Louis P. Shepherd Award in Creative Writing is given 
annually for the year's best student portfolio of creative 
writing. The award is named in honor of the late Louis P. 
Shepherd, a longtime English professor at Fitchburg State 
College, and made possible through a gift from Professor 
Shepherd's wife, Ruth, and his daughter, Rae Shepherd- 
Shlechter. 

M. Lillian Smith Scholarship is awarded to a student in the 
Education Program. 

Special Education Scholarship is available annually for a 
Special Education major student with a 2.7 average in the 
major who has a financial need and is active in the Special 
Education Club. 

Daniel J. Sullivan Scholarship is available to students 
demonstrating financial need. 

Philip J. Tardanico Scholarship is awarded to a junior 
enrolled as an Industrial Technology major. The scholarship 
is based on academic excellence, enthusiasm for and 
commitment to a career in teaching,- strong moral character, 
and financial need. A letter of reference must be submitted 
from a faculty member in the Industrial Technology 
Department. 

Michael Vignale Memorial Scholarship/Trust Fund 

is available to a Chemistry major. 

Dr. Burnham Walker Memorial Scholarship is awarded to a 
full-time student majoring in Biology, Chemistry, Nursing, 
or Clinical Lab Sciences. Awards are based on financial need 
and academic achievement. 

Lara A. Willard Memorial Scholarship is available annually 
to a female undergraduate nursing student based upon 
achievement, a demonstrated financial need, and the 
potential to succeed. 

Carl T. Witherell Scholarship is awarded to a full-time 
undergraduate enrolled as an Industrial Technology major. 

Xarras Scholarship is awarded to a full-time undergraduate 
student. Preference is given to graduates of Fitchburg High 
School. 




Ying Jean and Sui King Yee Endowed Scholarship is 

awarded to a first-year Asian -American student and based 
upon an excellent scholastic record and demonstrated 
participation and achievement in school and community 
activities. 

Scholarships for Graduate 
Students 

Craduate students are advised to review the complete 
financial aid section of this catalog beginning on page 31. 
Consult the Financial Aid Office for eligibility requirements. 

Graduate Scholarship Program 

Graduate scholarships are available in varying amounts. 
Scholarships are awarded in the form of tuition and fee 
waivers. For application deadlines, processes and procedures 
the student should contact the Dean of Curriculum and 
Instruction. 

Dean's Graduate Scholarship 

This award recognizes and honors graduate students who 
have achieved academic excellence in the course of their 
graduate studies. Scholarships in varying amounts are 
awarded annually in the form of tuition and fee waivers. 

Eligibility 

• Students who have applied to a graduate program at 
Fitchburg State College and have an undergraduate gpa of 
3.5 or better 

• Graduate students enrolled in a graduate program, have a 
gpa of 4.0, and are recommended by their Graduate 
Advisor or the Program Chair 

Application and Selection Process 

To apply for the Dean's Graduate Scholarship Awards, 
students must submit: 

• Completed Scholarship Application 

• Current Dated Resume 

• Recommendation of Graduate Program Chair through 
signature on the application 

• Academic record/transcripts 

The application and supporting materials should be mailed 
by February 1 5th to the Dean of Curriculum and 
Instruction. 

The Carla Borg Scholarship 

Available annually for a graduate student in special 
education who has demonstrated exemplary skills in 
including students with special needs as part of their school/ 
community. 

Dorothy Holmes Toporeck '28 Graduate 
Scholarship Program 

This award recognizes and honors students who have 
demonstrated scholastic excellence in their undergraduate 
studies and who are pursuing a Master's Degree at Fitchburg 
State College. The scholarship is only available to graduates 
of the Fitchburg State College undergraduate program. 

The amount of the award is determined annually. 
Scholarships are awarded in the form of tuition and fee 
waivers and may be used over a period of two years. 



Eligibility 

Candidates must have completed their undergraduate 
degree at Fitchburg State with a 3.25 gpa or better, and 
have been accepted into a graduate program at the College. 

Students currently enrolled in a graduate program must have 
a gpa of 3.75, an undergraduate gpa of 3.25 or better, and be 
recommended by their Graduate Advisor or the Program 
Chair. 

Application and Selection Process 

To apply for the Dorothy Holmes Toporeck Graduate 
Scholarship, students must submit: 

• Completed Scholarship Application 

• Current dated resume 

• Recommendation of Graduate Program Chair through 
signature on the application 

• Academic record/transcripts 

The application and supporting materials should be mailed 
by February 1 5th to the Dean of Curriculum and 
Instruction. 

All scholarship applications are reviewed by the Craduate 
Council and recommendations are made to the Dean of 
Graduate Studies. Once award recipients are chosen, they 
are notified by the Dean and an announcement is made at 
the Honors Convocation. 

For further information or applications, contact the 
Graduate and Continuing Education Office. 

Graduate Assistant Program 

Newly admitted and current graduate students are eligible 
to apply for Graduate Assistantships. The maximum amount 
of the award is $5500 for the academic year. The 
appointment and award includes a tuition waiver for 1 8 
semester hours of graduate course work for the academic 
year of the award (excluding independent studies, life-long 
learning courses, capstones, conferences, teleconferences, 
directed studies, internship, practica, fieldwork, LECAP, 
courses by arrangement or professional development 
seminars and lectures sponsored by Graduate and 
Continuing Education). Graduate Assistants must pay all 
fees. 

Qualifications 

Newly accepted graduate students seeking appointments to 
Graduate Assistant positions must have an undergraduate 
gpa of 3.0. 

Continuing Graduate students must have a graduate gpa of 
3.5. 

Application 

A completed application form, resume, and an unofficial 
transcript must be submitted by the applicant to the 
secretary for the Dean of Curriculum and Instruction, Office 
of Graduate Studies, no later than the second week of May. 

Load and Academic Requirements to Maintain 
Assistantship 

• Graduate Assistants must carry a load of six semester 
hours of graduate work per semester (fall and spring) in 
their program, which is considered full time. Overloads/ 
underloads may be petitioned to the Dean 

• Graduate Assistants are required to work 20 hours per 
week, which is considered a full-time work schedule 

• Graduate Assistants are not allowed to secure a second 
paid position on campus 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Undergraduate Academic Policies 
and Procedures 



A 




.11 students at Fitchburg State College are expected 
to be familiar with and act in accordance with 
academic policies and procedures. The policies are 
interpreted and administered by the Dean oj 
Curriculum and Instruction. Students acting outside oj 
these policies may be subject to administrative action. 
Special consideration may be given to students admitted 
or later identijied as physically handicapped, learning 
disabled, or economically or educationally 
disadvantaged. 



General Course Requirements 

To fulfill requirements for a Bachelor's Degree, students 
must complete either the requirements of the Liberal Arts 
and Sciences Program (explained in the Curriculum section 
of catalog) or the requirements of the Leadership Academy 
program, as well as the requirements for their major. 



The Major 



Undergraduate degree candidates must declare and 
complete a major in one program of study offered by the 
college. Requirements for undergraduate majors are 
described in the Undergraduate Day Programs and 
Undergraduate Evening Programs sections. 

Declaring a major 

Students may declare a major when they are admitted to the 
college. If a change of major is desired, students must 
complete a change of major card available in the Registrar's 
Office. For application and policies related to Educator 
Licensure programs, see p. 98. 

Pre-Majors (undeclared) 

Students with 60 semester hours of college course work 
must apply for and be admitted to a major prior to 
registering for additional courses. 



Transfer students with 60 or more credits when admitted as 
"Pre-Majors" have until either October 1 or March 1 of their 
first semester at Fitchburg State College to declare their 
major. 

Requirements for a Major 

A 2.0 cumulative gpa and 2.0 gpa in courses in the major are 
the minimum requirements for both admission to and 
completion of all major programs. Some majors, however, 
may have requirements higher than a 2.0 gpa in major 
courses for either entrance or completion. 

Dismissal from a major 

Students not making satisfactory progress in completing the 
academic requirements of the major may be asked to select 
another major. 

Professional programs of study may require a departmental 
review of students to determine if they are qualified to 
continue in the major. If in the review process the student is 
judged as unsuitable for the profession, regardless of 
academic standing, the student may be asked to select 
another major. 

Successful completion of an academic program in any major 
field or professional program does not obligate the faculty 
to recommend licensure or certification, even if the 
candidate is awarded the academic degree. 



Grading Policy 



Crades are awarded on a numerical scale as follows: 



4.0 


A 


Excellent 


3.5 


B+ 


Very Good 


3.0 


B 


Good 


2.5 


C+ 


Above Average 


2.0 


C 


Average 


1.5 


D+ 


Below Average but Passing 


1.0 


D 


Well Below Average but Passing 


0.0 


F 


Failing 




IN 


Incomplete 




IP 


In Progress 




W 


Withdrawn 




All 


Audit 




S 


Satisfactory 




U 


Unsatisfactory 



All grades except 0.0, U, IN, W, and AU are passing grades 
and earn credit toward the degree. 

Grade Guidelines 

All requirements and grading standards identified in 
individual class syllabi must be met. 

The Grade of 4.0 

The grade of 4.0 implies excellence in thinking and 
distinguished performance within the domain of a subject 
and course, along with extensive development of a range of 
knowledge acquired through the exercise of critical thinking 
skills and abilities. This level work is consistently clear, 
precise, well reasoned and displays depth of insight. 

The Grade of 3.0 

The grade of 3.0 implies sound thinking and performance 
within the domain of a subject and course, along with the 
development of a range of knowledge acquired through the 
exercise of critical thinking skills and abilities. This level 
work is generally clear, precise, well-reasoned and displays 
some depth of insight. 

The Grade of 2.0 

The grade of 2.0 implies mixed thinking and performance 
within the domain of a subject and course, along with some 
development of a range of knowledge acquired through the 
exercise of critical thinking skills and abilities. This level 
work is inconsistently clear, precise, well-reasoned and dos 
not typically display depth of insight. 

The Grade of 1.0 

The grade of 1.0 implies limited thinking and performance 
within the domain of a subject and course, and the student 
displays limited critical thinking skills and abilities requisite 
to understanding course content. The student attempts to 
acquire knowledge by memorization rather than through 
comprehension and understanding. This level work 
represents thinking that is typically unclear, imprecise, and 
poorly reasoned and does not display depth of insight. 



The Grade of 0.0 

The grade of 0.0 implies poor thinking and performance 
within the domain of a subject and course, and the student 
does not display critical thinking skills and abilities requisite 
to understanding course content. The student relies on 
acquiring knowledge by memorization rather than through 
comprehension and understanding. This level work 
represents thinking that is regularly unclear, imprecise, ad 
poorly reasoned and is lacking depth of insight. 

Computing quality points and cumulative 
GPA 

• Quality Points = semester hours (s.h.) carried by the 
course multiplied by numerical grade. (For example, a three- 
credit course with a grade of 3.0 would earn nine Quality points.) 

• Cumulative grade point average = total quality points 
earned in all courses divided by total credit hours 
completed 

Repeating Courses and Grade Substitution 

Repeating Courses after a Failing Grade 

A student may repeat a course in which the assigned grade 
is a 0.0 or U (Unsatisfactory). In these cases, the new grade 
will be substituted for the original grade in calculating the 
student's cumulative GPA. The original grade, however, will 
continue to appear on the transcript. A transfer grade of 2.0 
or better eliminates the original failing grade in calculating 
the cumulative gpa. Because grades from transfer courses are 
not transferable, the new grade itself is not calculated into 
the cumulative average. 

Repeating Courses after a Passing Grade or 
Audit 

A student may repeat once any Fitchburg State College 
course for which a 1 .0, 1.5, or AU is earned. Courses must 
be taken at Fitchburg State College and, if at all possible, 
should be taken within the following year. 

The repeated course will be indicated as such on the 
student's transcript. 

Satisfactory and Unsatisfactory Grades 

Any course can be taken for an S/U grade with the 
following exceptions: 

• Courses required for a major unless the department has 
designated them as acceptable. 

• Courses taken to fulfill the LA&S writing requirement. 

• Courses taken to fulfill the LA&S mathematics proficiency 
requirement. 

and with the following limitations: 

• A maximum of 12 credits of S/U can be applied toward 
the minimum credits required for a degree. 

• Only one course in each LA&S cluster may be taken S/U. 

• No more than two courses in any discipline (as identified 
by course-number prefix) may be taken S/U. 

• Only one course per semester may be taken S/U. 

• No quality points are awarded with the S/U grade. 

Students must request the S/U option by the Add/Drop 
deadline. Once recorded, the designation cannot be 
changed. 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Incomplete 

• An Incomplete (IN) is given in lieu of a grade if a student 
has successfully completed at least 80% of the required 
course work but cannot complete the rest due to 
certifiable illness or the death of an immediate family 
member. 

• Students must complete the required course work by the 
end of the fourth week of classes of the following 
semester in order to receive a grade, otherwise the IN is 
automatically changed to a grade of 0.0. 

• While an IN is not counted in determining academic 
status, it may have an impact on eligibility for financial 
aid and athletic participation. 

• Grades that result from the fulfillment of an IN will not 
remove a Probationary, Suspension, or Dismissal status, 
nor will they count toward Dean's List or President's List 
eligibility. 

Audit 

• An Audit (AU) is entered into the transcript to indicate 
that a student has been officially enrolled in a course for 
neither grade nor credit. 

• Students who wish to audit a course during the day must 
record the audit designation with the Registrar's Office by 
the end of the Add/Drop period. 

• Students who wish to audit a course during the evening 
must register the audit designation with the Registrar's 
Office before the third class meeting. 

Withdrawal from a Course 

• If a student officially withdraws from a course by the end 
of the eleventh week of classes, or prior to the twenty- 
sixth class hour for special scheduling classes in 
Continuing Education, a W (Withdrawn) is entered on 
the transcript. No credit is awarded for the course, and it 
does not affect the cumulative CPA. 

• If the student officially withdraws after the end of the 
eleventh week of classes or after the twenty-sixth class 
hour for scheduling classes in Continuing Education, a 
grade of 0.0 is entered on the transcript. A waiver is 
sometimes granted for documented, critical extenuating 
circumstances. 

Final Grades 

Final grades for courses are available to students on-line as 
soon as grades are posted. Contact professors for 
information about the grades you receive. For more 
information, see www.jsc.edu/registrarl '. 

Mid-Semester Grades 

Faculty will be encouraged to submit a mid-semester grade 
for all students that are achieving at the 1.5 grade level or 
lower, and/or are not attending their classes. The grades 
should reflect student achievement to date on graded 
assignments by the 8th week of the semester. 



Transcripts 



Unofficial transcripts are available to students on-line. 
Official transcripts may also be requested on-line. Each 
student receives one official transcript free of charge. For 
each additional transcript, there's a $5.00 fee. For more 
information, see www.jsc.edu/registrar. 



Attendance 



Each instructor has the prerogative to place a value upon 
class attendance and must inform the class of that value 
early in the semester. The instructor's class-attendance 
standard should be stated in the course syllabus. If a student 
is absent from a class meeting, the student is required to 
produce appropriate documentation for the instructor's 
review. 

Section 2B of Chapter 151c of the General Laws of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts reads as follows: 

Any student in an educational or vocational institution, other than a 
religious or denominational educational or vocational training 
institution, who is unable, because of religious beliefs, to attend classes or 
to participate in any examination, study, or work requirement on a 
particular day shall be excused from any such examination or study or 
work requirement, and shall be provided with an opportunity to make up 
such examination, study, or work requirement which may have been 
missed because of such absence on any particular day, provided, 
however, that such makeup examination or work shall not create an 
unreasonable burden upon the school. No fees of any kind shall be 
charged by the institution for making available to the said student such 
opportunity. No adverse or prejudicial effects shall result to students who 
avail themselves of the provisions of this section. 

Academic Standing 

All courses completed at Fitchburg State College, including 
those taken during winter or summer sessions, determine 
current academic standing. The grades and credit for 
wintersession and summer courses are included in the 
student's gpa. 

Credits transferred from another institution are applied to a 
student's total number of credits earned, but grades earned 
from transferred credits are not calculated into the 
cumulative gpa. 

Good Academic Standing 

To achieve good academic standing, students must: 

• Maintain an overall cumulative gpa of 2.0 or higher 

• Maintain a cumulative gpa of 2.0 or higher in the major 

• Meet any additional requirements of the major which 
have been approved by the All-College Committee and 
are consistent with college policy 

Honors 

Fitchburg State College honors students who have high 
academic achievement throughout their college career as 
well as at graduation. The honors are: 



President's List 

Honors students for consistently high academic 
achievement. Students are named to the President's List 
when they have attained a semester average of 3.75 or 
higher for three successive semesters while maintaining full- 
time status. Incompletes do not count toward the President's 
List. 

Dean's List 

Honors students who have attained an average of 3.2 or 
better for the semester while maintaining full-time status. 
Incompletes do not count toward the Dean's List. 

Summer Dean's List 

Students taking 12 semester hours or more through 
Continuing Education during the summer sessions who 
maintain an average of 3.2. These students can be named to 
the President's List if they meet the specified cumulative 
average. 

Graduation Honors 

Graduation honors recognize outstanding academic careers 
as signified by a high cumulative average. To graduate with 
honors, a student must have completed at least 60 credits 
with a numerical grade at the College. 

Summa Cum Laude honors students who graduate with a 
cumulative gpa of 3.8 or higher. 

Magna Cum Laude honors students who graduate with a 
cumulative gpa of 3.5 to 3.79. 

Cum Laude honors students who graduate with a cumulative 
gpa of 3.2 to 3.49. 

A Commonwealth Scholar Special Distinction is given to students 
who have completed the Leadership Academy (Honors 
Program) and a senior thesis. 

Probation 

If a student's cumulative gpa falls below 2.0 at the end of 
any semester, that student will be placed on probation. To 
avoid suspension the student must meet the following 
criteria: 

• A student on probation who has attempted fewer than 33 
semester hours and who has maintained a cumulative gpa 
of 1 .6 or higher for two semesters may enroll for a third 
semester to improve academic standing. 

• A student on probation who has attempted 33 to 59 
semester hours and who has maintained a cumulative gpa 
of 1 .8 or higher for four semesters may enroll for a fifth 
semester to improve academic standing. 

Students on probation must: 

• Meet with their academic advisors before the start of the 
second week of each semester to review current course 
load and arrange periodic meetings throughout the 
semester. 

• Contact the Academic Advising Center during the first 
two weeks of the semester. 

• Utilize the many resources the college offers, including 
faculty, Counseling Services, Academic Success Centers, 
Expanding Horizons, Career Services, and other support 
systems, as needed. 



Students placed on probation for the first 
time will remain eligible to: 

• Hold elected or appointed office 

• Serve on campus committees 

• Participate on athletic teams (provided academic progress 
meets the criteria in Section 1) 

Any additional probations will disqualify a student from 
eligibility for these activities. 

Students who voluntarily withdraw from the college while 
on probation will remain on probation if they are 
readmitted. 

Students who maintain the college's academic standards for 
probation must also meet the financial aid and athletic 
eligibility requirements for satisfactory academic progress. 
(Financial aid and athletics have additional academic 
requirements for probationary students. Students should 
consult the appropriate office to determine their eligibility.) 

Suspension 

Any student who earns a grade point average of 1 .0 or 
lower in his/her first semester of full-time study at 
Fitchburg State College will be suspended from the 
college. In all other cases, students will be suspended if they 
have spent at least one semester on probation and do not 
meet the following gpa and credit criteria: 

• A student who has attempted fewer than 33 semester 
hours and has a cumulative gpa below 1 .6 after two 
semesters 

• A student who has attempted 33-59 semester hours and 
has a cumulative gpa below 1 .8 after four semesters 

• A student who has attempted 60 credits and has less than 
a 2.0 cumulative gpa 

Suspended students are not eligible to enroll in any credit 
course in any division of Fitchburg State College for at least 
one semester. 

Following suspension, students must submit a letter 
requesting re-admission before the deadline established by 
the Registrar. Students who are readmitted after a 
suspension do so under contract with the Dean of 
Undergraduate Studies. 

Suspension status is not changed by a voluntary withdrawal. 

Dismissal 

Once students have been readmitted after a suspension, they 
must meet probationary standards and do so under contract 
with the Dean of Undergraduate Studies for enrollment to 
avoid dismissal. 

Dismissal status results in permanent dismissal from all 
divisions of Fitchburg State College. A dismissed student 
may not enroll in any credit courses in any division of the 
college for a period of 5 years. 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Credit Elimination Policy 

The Credit Elimination Policy applies to students who 
leave the College and desire to return after five or more 
calendar years. Such students may eliminate all or part of 
previously earned credits from their transcripts, in units of 
one semester or more. When a particular semester of 
credit is designated to be eliminated, all credits from this 
semester must be eliminated. 

This policy requires that: 

• Credit elimination may only occur once 

• A request for credit elimination must be in writing 

• The Dean of Curriculum and Instruction must approve 
the request 

Transfer Credit 

Credit received for courses completed at other regionally 
accredited institutions of higher education may be 
transferred to Fitchburg State College and applied toward 
degree programs if: 

• The courses are equivalent to courses offered by Fitchburg 
State College or appropriate to programs at Fitchburg 
State College 

• The grade received was at least a 2.0 (C) or higher 

Credit for courses transferred with passing grades below 2.0 
may be approved in exceptional circumstances or if the 
credits are included as part of an Articulation Agreement/ 
Associate's Degree program covered by the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts Transfer Compact or the Joint Admissions 
Program. 

• A maximum of 60 SH credit from 2 year institutions, 
college level examinations, military will be considered for 
transfer 

• A maximum of 75 SH of credit will be considered from 4 
year baccalaureate institutions 

Value of transferred credit 

• Transferred credits count only as credit hours earned 

• No quality points or grades are transferred or calculated 
in the student's cumulative gpa 

• A minimum of 45 semester hours toward a baccalaureate 
degree must be completed at Fitchburg State College 

• For students with one major degree program and one or 
more minors, no more than 50% of major credits and 50% 
of minor credits can be completed as transfer credits. For 
students with two major programs (double majors), up to 
two/thirds of the credits (67%) in one of the two majors 
may be accepted as transfer credit, upon the advice of 
both major advisors and with the approval of the 
Department Chairs and the Dean of Curriculum and 
Instruction. At least 50% of the two majors combined 
must be Fitchburg State College coursework (that is, any 
additional courses accepted as transfer credit for one 
major must be balanced by additional Fitchburg State 
College coursework in the second major). 

• Major departments may have additional requirements 

Approval of transfer credit may be authorized by the 
Registrar, the Dean of Curriculum and Instruction, or the 
Dean of Education. 



Academic Dishonesty Policy 

Academic dishonesty in all its forms, including cheating, 
fabrication, plagiarism, and the facilitating of academic 
dishonesty by aiding and abetting any of the 
aforementioned, is not tolerated at Fitchburg State College. 
Violators will be subject to the following process. 

Step One 

• Within ten days of the discovery of the alleged offense, 
the faculty member involved will contact the student, 
inform him/her of the circumstance in question, and 
arrange a meeting to discuss it. 

• If the faculty member finds the student responsible for the 
alleged behavior, he/she will write a statement, either 
during the meeting with the student or within seven days 
of it, indicating the alleged dishonesty, his/her judgment 
regarding it, and the sanctions, if any, to be imposed. 

• If the student is found not responsible, he/she will be 
notified in a statement written by the faculty member as 
described above. 

• In either case, the student will sign the statement, 
indicating either that he/she accepts the outcome or that 
he/she has seen the statement but does not accept the 
outcome. The student gets a copy of this statement, and 
the faculty member retains the original as part of his/her 
records for the class. 

Students found responsible for the alleged behavior based 
upon the evidence presented may be subject to one or more 
of the following sanctions by the faculty member: 

• Be required to complete additional course requirements,- 
this may include repeating part or all of the work in 
question. 

• Receive a grade of 0.0 for the work in question. 

• Receive a grade of 0.0 for the course 

• Be referred to the department chairperson for transmittal 
of the case to the Committee on Academic Dishonesty. If 
the referral is made at a time when a grade is due to the 
Registrar, the faculty member will submit an Incomplete 
for the student. 

Step Two 

When the faculty member has taken the action described 
under #4 above, the faculty member agrees that the 
disposition of the case, including the imposition of any 
actions, will be determined by the Committee. Once a case 
is referred to the Committee on Academic Dishonesty, the 
procedures and timelines of the Student Judicial 
Code apply. 

The Academic Dishonesty Committee is composed of two 
faculty members appointed for a one-year term by the 
MSCA faculty union, two student members of the Student 
Conduct Board, and an administrator from the Office of 
Academic Affairs, who will chair the committee. 




Step Three 

When the student believes that the accusation made and/ 
or the sanctions imposed by the faculty member are unfair, 
he/she may take the case to the department chairperson. 
The chairperson will arrange a meeting with the student 
and the faculty member. Within ten days of this meeting, 
the chairperson will notify the student and the faculty 
member in writing of his/her opinion on the case. 

If the student is dissatisfied with the outcome of an appeal 
to the chairperson, he/she may appeal the case to the 
Committee on Academic Dishonesty. This process is 
initiated by contacting the Dean of Student and Academic 
Life or another administrator in the Office of Academic 
Affairs. 

Cases may be referred directly to the Committee when the 
student(s) accused of academic dishonesty is not in the class 
of the discovering faculty member or when a student(s) 
wants to bring a case against another student(s). 

Students found responsible* for the alleged behavior by the 
Committee may be subject to the following actions: 

• Have the sanction(s) imposed by the faculty member 
lessened 

• Have the sanction(s) imposed by the faculty member 
upheld 

• Receive a grade of 0.0 for the work in question 

• Receive a grade of 0.0 for the course 

• Be required to perform some kind of service to the college 
community 

• Be referred to the President of the college with a 
recommendation 

of Suspension 

• Be referred to the President of the college with a 
recommendation 

of Expulsion 

Students found not responsible* for the alleged behavior by 
the Committee will be recompensed in one or more or all of 
the following ways: 

• All work which had been in question will be accepted 

• The sanction(s) imposed by the faculty member will be 
removed 

An opportunity to redo part or all of the assignment or exam 
in question will be granted when the Committee finds that a 
seeming act of academic dishonesty was unintentional and 
the result of a lack of understanding of proper procedure. 

• Rules of Evidence do not apply in college hearings. 
Evidence "beyond a reasonable doubt" is not necessary for 
a student to be found responsible. The Committee will be 
asked to determine, from the case presented by both 
sides, which side has more evidence to support its 
position. 



Undergraduate Day 

Policies and Procedures 

Course Registration 

Approval of Course Schedule 

Prior to course registration each semester, students must 
meet with their advisor to review their academic progress 
and to develop a course schedule for the upcoming semester. 
Advisors must approve course selections before the student 
is permitted to register. 

Identification of Class Standing 

For the purpose of registration and financial aid, the 
following classifications are identified: 

Freshmen students with between 0-24 earned credits 

Sophomores .. students with between 25-48 earned credits 

Juniors students with between 49-72 earned credits 

Seniors students with 73 or more earned credits 

Add/Drop 

During the first six class days of the semester, students may 
either add or drop a course. Although students may make 
changes to their schedule during the Add/Drop period 
without the approval of their advisor, they should confer 
with their advisor when making changes that affect their 
progress towards graduation or fulfillment of their major 
requirements. 

Course Withdrawal 

Through the eleventh week of the semester, students may 
withdraw from courses and receive a W (Withdrawn). 
Appropriate forms are available at the Registrar's Office and 
must be signed by the course instructor, the faculty advisor, 
and, if the student is dropping below 12 semester hours, the 
Dean of Curriculum and Instruction. Withdrawal after the 
eleventh week results in a grade of 0.0. 

Course Load 

Graduation requirement: a minimum of 120 semester hours 
in all majors (See Undergraduate Day Programs) 

Full-time status: a minimum of 12 semester hours each 
semester 

Students must maintain full-time status to remain eligible for 
financial aid, varsity athletics, academic honors, including 
Dean's List, participation in student governance, VA 
benefits, scholarships, and health insurance coverage. Both 
day and continuing education courses are included in 
calculating total semester hours. 

Maximum allowable course load: 18 semester hours 
Students registering for more than 1 8 semester hours 
(whether solely at Fitchburg State College or in conjunction 
with courses taken at another college) must have the 
permission of the Dean of Curriculum and Instruction along 
with their major advisor. A student with a cumulative gpa 
below 3.0 will normally not be granted permission to 
register for more than 18 semester hours. Students taking 
overloads without permission may be denied credit for 
overload courses, regardless of grades earned. 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Four-year undergraduate degree: at least 15 semester 
hours per semester are recommended for graduation in 
four years. Certain majors may require enrollment in 
specific courses or with specific course loads in certain 
semesters,- students are responsible for understanding 
requirements for their major. 

Program enrollment: Under certain circumstances, day 
program students may be permitted to enroll full time for a 
semester through the Continuing Education programs, and 
vice-versa. Approval for such enrollments must be granted 
by the Dean of Undergraduate Studies. 

Withdrawal from the College 

Students who withdraw from the college, either during or 
between semesters, must complete a withdrawal form with 
the Dean of Student and Academic Life. Students who 
withdraw within the first eleven weeks of the semester will 
receive a "W" in each course. 

Students who leave the college after eleven weeks of the 
semester will receive a grade of 0.0 or "U" in all their courses 
unless granted a waiver by the Dean of Student and 
Academic Life for documented extenuating circumstances. 

Students withdrawing in good standing may apply for 
readmission to the Registrar before May 1 for fall semester 
or November 1 for spring semester. Readmission is not 
guaranteed. The Registrar will consider academic, financial, 
and college discipline records, in addition to space available, 
when granting readmission. 

Students must complete the registration process prior to the 
start of classes of the semester they wish to be readmitted. 

Student Grievance 

A student who is dissatisfied with a grade received or with 
any other aspect of instruction in a particular course is to 
confer with the Instructor, who will explain the reasons for 
awarding the grade. If such a conference fails to achieve a 
satisfactory resolution, the student should confer with the 
Department Chair. If still unsatisfied, the student may then 
appeal in writing to the Dean of Student and Academic Life 
to adjudicate the situation. 



Undergraduate Evening 
Policies and Procedures 

Course Registration 

Students must register for courses within the curriculum 
requirements as set in the College Catalog of the year of 
matriculation. However, it is the right of the college to alter 
the requirements to meet statutory, educational, or 
professional standards. 

For regularly scheduled courses, students must register 
before the second class meeting. Early registration is 
recommended for all matriculated students and applicants in 
order to secure seats in the courses needed to proceed in 
degree programs. The regular registration period ends two 
weeks prior to the start of the semester, with "late 
registration" and late charges commencing thereafter. Please 
refer to the semester course bulletin for specific registration 
dates. 

Senior Level-Graduate Credit Policy 

A senior level student (90 semester hours or more) with a 
3.5 gpa or better may register for Graduate credit courses at 
the 6000 level and above with the following restrictions: 

• Approval must be obtained from the Dean of Graduate 
Studies or designee 

• Combined Graduate and Undergraduate credit load in a 
semester is not more than 1 5 hours 

• No more than three Graduate credits may be taken in a 
semester 

• Recommendation of the appropriate Undergraduate 
Advisor and Registrar must be submitted to the Dean of 
Graduate Studies for approval 

• No more than nine semester hours of Graduate credit may 
be accumulated by a senior. Graduate credits are 
applicable to maintain full-time status to receive financial 
aid 

• Graduate courses taken toward undergraduate degree 
requirements cannot be transferred into a graduate 
program at Fitchburg State College 

Scheduling of Courses 

The Office of Graduate and Continuing Education 
schedules courses at times that are convenient for working 
adults. Schedules are created in the academic departments in 
consultation with the Office of Graduate and Continuing 
Education. Most courses are offered in the late afternoon or 
evening, some courses are scheduled on weekends. Winter 
session and summer session courses are scheduled during 
mornings, afternoons, or evenings. 

Course Load 

Fall and spring semesters: Maximum academic load is nine 
credit hours. 

Winter session: Maximum academic load is six credit hours. 

Summer session: The maximum academic load during the 
combined summer sessions is 12 credit hours. 

Any student registering for credit beyond the normal load 
must submit a written request seeking approval from their 
advisor prior to registering by submitting an academic 
petition waiver form. 



Full-time status: Minimum of 12 semester hours each 
semester. Students must maintain full-time status to remain 
eligible for financial aid, varsity athletics, academic honors, 
including Dean's List, participation in student governance, 
VA benefits, scholarships, and health insurance coverage. 
Both day and continuing education courses are included in 
calculating total semester hours. 

Course Changes 

Changes to courses must be made before the second 
meeting. No change in credit is permitted after the second 
meeting. After the start of the second class meeting, the 
dropping of a class is considered a withdrawal. A change of 
credit to audit status must be made before the third class 
meeting of a course. (Class meeting is defined as 2.5 hours.) 

Course Withdrawals 

Withdrawals without academic penalty may be made 
through the end of the eleventh week of classes for regularly 
scheduled courses and up to the twenty-sixth class hour for 
special scheduling courses or institute courses. Course 
withdrawal is initiated by calling the Registrar's Office, or 
by visiting that office in the Sanders Administration 
Building. In either case, the student must receive a 
confirming copy of the completed Course Withdrawal 
Form. Any student who withdraws by simply not attending 
classes automatically receives a failing grade for the course. 

Cancellation of Courses 

The College may cancel courses for insufficient enrollment 
or for other reasons deemed to be in the best interest of the 
college. Students who sign up for a course which is canceled 
may transfer to another course or receive a full refund of 
tuition and fees. 

Withdrawal from the College 

A degree-seeking undergraduate student may initiate 
withdrawal from the college by contacting the Dean of 
Student and Academic Life. A student who does not register 
for a course for two years is automatically withdrawn. A 
degree-seeking student who decides to return to Fitchburg 
State College must initiate reinstatement through the 
Registrar's Office. 

Student Grievance 

A student who is dissatisfied with a grade received or with 
any other aspect of instruction in a particular course is to 
confer with the Instructor, who will explain the reasons for 
awarding the grade. If such a conference fails to achieve a 
satisfactory resolution, the student should confer with the 
Department Chair. If still unsatisfied, the student may then 
appeal in writing to the Dean of Student and Academic Life 
to adjudicate the situation. 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Student Support Services 




Fitchburg State College is committed to the academic 
success oj its students. Several programs are available 
to advise, assist, and guide students, including 
individual advisors, the Academic Advising Center, and 
the Academic Success Centers. Students are encouraged 
to consult with any or all oj these programs throughout 
the academic year. 



Academic Advising 



The Advisor is a critical resource for all students during 
their academic career. Every student is assigned a faculty 
advisor. The advisor fulfills many important functions for a 
student, including: 

• Being the primary resource in the planning of a course 
schedule each semester 

• Advising students regarding any problem or concern 
involving their academic program 

Advisor Availability 

Undergraduates 

All faculty have at least three office hours during the week 
set aside for meetings with their students. Hours are posted 
on doors of faculty offices, in the office of the secretary of 
the major department, and are also available through the 
Office of Academic Affairs. Advisors are available for 
extended hours the month prior to registration each 
semester. 

Graduate and Continuing Education Students 

For general advising purposes faculty advisors are available 
each night, Monday through Thursday, during the semester. 
Appointments with advisors for general advising are made 
through the Office of the Registrar. 



Academic Advising Center 

The Academic Advising Center specializes in assisting 
undergraduate day students who: 

• Have not declared a major 

• Challenge courses via Life Experience Credit Award 
Program (LECAP) 

• Are experiencing academic difficulty 

• Are needing help in interpreting specific academic 
regulations 

The Center is staffed by two full-time administrators chosen 
for their specific expertise in assisting students to make the 
best possible use of their academic experience. 

The Advising Center, located on the third floor of the 
Campus Center/Library. Please refer to our web site at 
www.fsc.edu/advisingctr 978-665-3319 or 3 321. 

Academic Success Centers 

The Academic Success Centers are a group of programs and 
services that work collaboratively to support students 
toward their academic success and assist students to achieve 
their Fitchburg State College degree. The collective 
approach is pro-active and student centered. 

Students are encouraged to investigate the programs and 
services and consider how the Centers' staff can assist them 
to address their concerns and realize their goals. 



The following programs and services comprise the 
Academic Success Centers: Academic Advising Center, 
ACCESS Program and Office of Minority Affairs, 
Counseling Services, Career Services, Disability Services, 
Expanding Horizons, International Education Office, 
Mathematics Center, Placement Test Center, Tutor Center, 
and the Writing Center. 

For further information, visit the Academic Success 
Centers web site at http://www.jsc.edu/success. 

Mathematics Center 

The Mathematics Center offers peer tutors who specialize 
in one-on-one tutoring on a walk-in basis. Tutoring is 
available for fundamentals of arithmetic and algebra 
through upper-level mathematics courses. Tutors will 
guide you and provide an explanation of the concepts and 
steps to solving your specific mathematics questions. 

The Mathematics Center is open Sunday through 
Thursday evenings from 6:00 - 9:00 PM and Monday 
through Thursday from 10:30 AM - 4:30 PM. Students 
affiliated with the ACCESS Program, Disability Services 
and the Expanding can request individual Math tutoring 
by contacting the Tutor Center. All other students must 
use the Math Center walk-in service. A listing of specific 
subject specialties and tutors' hours are posted at the Math 
Center and on the web site at http://www.jsc.edu/tutoring/ 
math. 

Writing Center 

The Writing Center offers professional tutors and peer 
tutors who specialize in one-on-one tutoring. The Writing 
Center is open on a walk-in basis Monday through 
Thursday from 10:30—4:30. Individual tutoring can be 
requested for evening hours by contacting the Tutor Center. 

All Writing Center tutoring begins in the same manner, with 
a discussion of the assignment or writing project. What 
happens next depends on where you are in the writing 
process and what your needs are. Tutors strive to help you 
develop your writing at each stage of the writing process. 
Tutors do not write on your paper! Tutors will guide you and 
provide an explanation of the specific aspects of your 
writing that you will want to improve. You are the author, 
together we notice problems, but you make the final 
decision on any changes you want to make. 

The Writing Center is located on the third floor of the 
Library/Campus Center. For further information contact the 
Tutor Center at 978-665-3499 and visit our web site at 

www.jsc.edu/writingctr. 

Placement Test Center 

The Placement Test Center administers the required 
placement tests in Algebra, Reading, Writing and Foreign 
Languages for all new freshman and transfer students. 
Students also receive advisement on the required beginning 
sequence of courses appropriate for them at Fitchburg State 
College. 

Please visit our web site at http://www.jsc.edu/tutoring and select 
the "Assessment Center: for further information regarding 
waivers, test dates, test registration and practice tests. 



Tutor Center 

The Tutor Center offers free individual peer tutoring, in a 
variety of subjects, designed to assist students to increase 
their academic performance. Tutoring sessions focus on 
reviewing and explaining content and concepts. Tutors also 
integrate note taking and test preparation strategies. 

Individual Study and Learning Strategy Sessions are 
available. Students are assisted to craft a study plan that 
builds effective learning habits, long-term memory and 
improved note taking and test taking skills. 

Test preparation workshops and individual tutoring assists 
students to prepare for the Massachusetts Tests for Educator 
Licensure Communication and Literacy Skills test. 

The Tutor Center has earned the prestigious College 
Reading and Learning Association (CRLA) "National Peer 
Tutor Certification" status. This provides the Tutor Center 
the authorization to award National Peer Tutor Certification 
to peer tutors who meet the four standards of quality, (tutor 
training, selection, experience and evaluation) required by 
the CRLA. 

Peer Tutors are qualified! They have earned a 3.5 or 4.0 in 
the subjects that they tutor. Tutors are interviewed and 
demonstrate excellent communication skills. Tutors receive a 
written reference from their professor and complete a ten- 
hour Tutor Training Seminar. Tutors have learned the 
process of effective tutoring and they integrate learning 
strategies within each tutoring session. 

The Tutor Center is located in room 324 in the Library/ 
Campus Center. To make an appointment to request an 
individual peer tutor call 978-665-3499, walk-in the Tutor 
Center office, or visit the Tutor Center web site at 

www.jsc.edu/tutoring . 

The ACCESS Program and 
Minority Affairs Programs 

The ACCESS Program is a highly successful state funded 
academic support program. This educational opportunity 
program, for 30 years, has provided assistance to talented, 
low-income and educationally disadvantaged students who 
possess the motivation and potential to be successful in a 
college environment. The students are chosen to participate 
in the program for their academic potential and desire to 
improve their academic skills. 

• One-to-one tutoring (Tutor Center) 

• One-to-one academic advising 

• Assistance with study skills 

• Financial Aid Awareness 

• Assistance with reading, writing, and mathematics 

• Individual/Group Counseling 

• The Heritage Awards Banquet and Ball 

Recruitment, retention and graduation of first generation, 
low-income, urban students comprise the focus of the 
ACCESS Program. 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



The Minority Affairs Program 

The ACCESS Office also administers the Minority Affairs 
Program. Minority Affairs is responsible for the planning, 
development and implementation of programs and services 
to improve the possibilities of success for minority students. 
Programs such as the Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration, 
Black History Month, and Latino Awareness Month are 
encouraged, supported and coordinated. Special events such 
as informational speakers, workshops and social events are 
conducted to enhance the awareness of different cultures 
and foster diversity. It is our responsibility to assist the 
Admission Office with the recruitment and outreach 
activities for all undergraduate underrepresented students 
across the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

ACCESS and Minority Affairs Office support the following 
student organizations: 

The Black Student Union (BSU) 

The Latin American Student Organization (LASO) 

The Haitian American Culture Club (HACC) 

The ACCESS Programs serves Massachusetts residents who 
meet one of the following criteria: 

• The first person in the family to attend college 

• Meet the low-income criteria 

• Attended high school located in or near Boston, 
Cambridge, Fall, River, Fitchburg, Lawrence, Lowell, New 
Bedford, Springfield, or Worcester 

• Participated in academic programs such as Upward Bound 
or Talent Search Educational Opportunity Center (TRIO 
Programs), METCO, or Urban Scholars 

• Receive public assistance 

When applying to the college, students interested in the 
ACCESS Programs should place a check mark in the box 
next to 'ACCESS Program' on the Student Profile of the 
application. The college encourages students and parents to 
visit the campus and meet the staff. 

The ACCESS Office is located in the Gallucci-Cirio 
Library, room 320 in the Hammond Building The office 
telephone number is 978-665-3399. 

ACCESS Office hours: 

Mondays 8:00am to 6:00pm 

Tuesdays 8:00am to 9:00pm 

Wednesdays 8:00am to 7:00pm 

Thursdays 8:00am to 9:00pm 

Fridays 8:00am to 5:00pm 



Expanding Horizons 

Expanding Horizons is a student support services program 
designed to promote the academic success of Fitchburg 
State College students who are from low-income 
backgrounds, families where neither parent has attained a 
baccalaureate degree, and/or students with disabilities. 
Funded by the federal government, Expanding Horizons is 
part of the nationwide network of TRIO Programs, 
established over thirty years ago, that have helped an 
estimated 2 million students to enter and graduate from 
college despite barriers due to race, ethnic background, 
socio-economic circumstances, or disability. 



The Expanding Horizons Program at Fitchburg State 
College endeavors to create a smaller learning community 
within the larger campus community. EHP staff work with 
students to facilitate the adjustment to college and enhance 
their ability to attain their fullest academic potential. 
Towards these ends EHP offers the following programs and 
services: 

For freshman and transfer students: 

• Extended Pre-semester Orientation Program 

• Peer Mentors 

• Explorations I and II (a freshman orientation course — one 
credit) 

• Individualized Academic Assessment 
For all Expanding Horizons students: 

• Learning Specialist Support 

• Career and Academic Counseling 

• Personal Problem Solving 

• Professional Developmental Writing Tutor 

• Study Skills Support 

• Peer and Professional Tutors 

• Junior/Senior Seminar — preparation for graduate school 
and/or the transition to employment 

• State of the Art Computer Work Stations for student use 

• Social and cultural activities 

• EHP works in collaboration with all the Academic 
Success Centers to promote student success 

To be eligible for Expanding Horizons, a student must be a 
citizen or national of the United States or meet the 
residency requirement for federal financial assistance,- be 
enrolled or accepted for enrollment at Fitchburg State 
College and: 

• Meet federal low income guidelines 

• Be first generation to college (neither parent has achieved 
a baccalaureate degree) 

And/Or 

• Be a person with a disability 

For further information or to be a participant in the 
Expanding Horizons Program come to our office on the 
third floor of the Hammond Building or call 978-665-3064. 

International Education Office 

Fitchburg State College encourages a global perspective on 
campus by promoting programs for international students as 
well as for students who want to study in another country. 
Both types of students enrich the cultural and ethnic 
diversity of the college community. The International 
Education Office benefits international students, those who 
wish to study in another country, and those who are 
interested in an on-campus international experience. 

Services offered to international students include assistance 
with their transition to college, cultural awareness programs, 
and guidance when completing the necessary paperwork 
and communications with the United States Immigration 
Service. 



Fitchburg State College encourages students to consider a 
semester or a year of study in another country as part of 
their educational experience. The college has established a 
number of study abroad programs with colleges and 
universities throughout the world. For specific information 
about international study possibilities, contact the Office of 
International Education, 349 Highland Ave. (Highland 
House), 978-665-3089. 



Career Services 



Disability Services 



Disability Services is the primary support system for 
students with disabilities taking classes in the day and 
evening division. A number of services are available 
including an adaptive computer lab, tutors, peer mentoring, 
tape recorders, testing accommodations, note takers, 
readers, interpreters, support groups, coaching, and 
consultation with faculty. The adaptive computer lab houses 
a voice activated computer system, Braille printer, scanner 
with print recognition, screen enlargement programs, a 
closed circuit television for the visually impaired, speech 
synthesizers, and screen reading programs and Kurzweil 
3000. Disability Services and the Adaptive Computer Lab 
are located on the third floor of the Hammond Building. 
Contact 978-665-4020 or 978-665-3575 TTY for more 
information or our website at www.jsc.edu/disability. 

Academic Accommodations 

All accommodations are provided based upon assessment of 
individual need. Students desiring an accommodation that 
will enable them to fully participate in academic or campus 
activities should follow these procedures: 

• Submit the appropriate documentation to the Office of 
Disability Services from a certified diagnostician 

• Meet with the Staff of Disability Services 

• Complete an accommodation sheet 

• Submit the completed accommodation sheet to the 
appropriate department 

Testing Accommodations 

Students with disabilities needing testing accommodations 
for placement exams or other standardized tests must submit 
requests for accommodations to the Office of Disability 
Services at least one week prior to the test date. Extended- 
time, out-of-classroom testing, oral exams, and other 
alternative testing are options offered to students with 
disabilities. 

Reduced Course Load 

Waivers may be available to students with disabilities who 
need the accommodation of a reduced course load. Waivers 
are granted by the Dean of Undergraduate Studies. Students 
with disabilities needing the accommodation of a reduced 
course load will not be penalized by Financial Aid or 
Housing. 



The Career Services Center provides a variety of programs 
and activities to assist students and alumni in planning for 
career decisions during and after Fitchburg State College. 
The Center provides all aspects of career guidance and 
counseling, as well as assists students in the school to work, 
undergraduate to graduate transition. 

All services are accessible through the Career Services 
Center's web site at www.jsc.edu/careersvs . 

The Center is located on the third floor of the Hammond 
Building. We can be contacted at 978-665-3151 or 
careersvs@jsc.edu. 

Counseling Services 

The Counseling Services Office provides confidential short- 
term counseling to all students at no charge. Clinicians are 
available for individual, group and couples counseling, crisis 
intervention, educational programming, outreach 
workshops, community referrals, and inservice training. 

Counseling Services offers a variety of outreach programs to 
educate students in the areas of sexual assault and violence 
prevention, body image, stress and anger management, 
eating disorders, and depression. 

The Counseling Services Center is located on the third floor 
of the Hammond Building. The hours are 8:30 am to 5:00 
pm, Monday through Friday. Appointments can be made in 
person or over the telephone (978-665-3152). Students can 
see a clinician without an appointment during the daily 
"walk-in" time, which is from 2:00 pm-3:00 pm daily, 
however it is strongly encouraged that students schedule 
appointments if at all possible. 

Counseling Services provides 24 hour emergency response 
to the college during the regular academic year. The 
counselor-on-call can be reached through the Campus 
Police Department at (978-665-3 1 1 1 ), or by contacting 
Campus Living staff. 

Student Health Services 

Student Health Services provides ambulatory care and 
health education/promotion, and maintains health records 
for all full-time undergraduate students at the college. 
Services include: 

• Emergency care of acute illness and injury 

• Evaluation, treatment &/or referrals as needed 

• Immunizations routinely available include: tetanus- 
diphtheria (Td), mumps-measles-rubella (MMR), 
Hepatitis B, Influenza, and Meningitis Vaccine 

• Tuberculin skin testing (PPD) 

• Health education and health promotion 

• Allergy injections ordered by student's physician (student 
supplies own allergy medication). Injections are 
administered exclusively during physician office hours. 

• Women's health care, such as, breast exams, gynecologic 
exams, and contraception 

• Men's health care 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Nurse practitioners and a consulting physician provide 
health care. 

Student Health Services is located in the Anthony Building 
across the parking lot from Sanders Administration Building. 

Health Requirement Policy 

In compliance with Massachusetts Public Law 105 CMR 
220.600, the following are the immunization requirements 
for Fitchburg State College. 

Full-time Matriculated Undergraduate, Graduate, or other 
category of Residential Student and International Students* 
studying on campus. 

• Completed Fitchburg State College Health Form 
including a Physical Exam that has been completed 
within the past year, 

• One dose of mumps and rubella vaccine(s) given at or 
after 12 months of age or serologic proof of immunity ,- 

• Two doses of live measles containing vaccine(s) given at 
least one month apart beginning at or after 12 months or 
serologic proof of immunity, 

• Or two doses of MMR vaccine given at least one month 
apart beginning at or after 1 2 months of age, 

• A booster dose of TD within the past 1 years, and 

• In September 2001, 3 doses of hepatitis B vaccine will be 
required for all full-time freshmen. This requirement will 
continue to be phased-in and apply to all full-time 
students (Freshman through Graduate) by 2005. 

international students must present proof of freedom from 
tuberculosis. 

Part-time Matriculated Undergraduate 
Students in Health Sciences. 

• Need the state required immunizations as stated above in 

# 2-5. A complete physical is not required for part-time 
students. 

Part-time and Full-time Matriculated 
Undergraduate and Graduate Nursing 
Students 

• Annual physical 

• Annual PPD (TB test) and proof of a negative chest x-ray 
if the PPD test was positive, 

• Need the state required immunizations as stated above 

# 2-4 plus 

• 3 doses of hepatitis B vaccine and a copy of dated immune 
titer. 

Failure to comply with these requirements will prohibit you 
from registering for classes. 

Student Health Insurance 

Every student registered for 9 or more credits is required by 
law to purchase health insurance. Students must purchase 
the school sponsored health plan or show proof of 
comparable coverage in an alternate health plan in order 
to enroll. 

After a student registers they will receive an Enrollment/ 
Waiver Form. All students must complete this card by either 
choosing to be enrolled in the Student Health Insurance 
Program or waiving participation by providing the policy 
number of an alternate insurance plan. 



If you do not complete the Enrollment/Waiver Form, the 
college will automatically enroll you in the health plan and 
include the cost of the insurance in your tuition bill. You 
will be enrolled in the plan unless you inform the school 
that you do not wish to participate in the school insurance 
program by showing proof of comparable coverage. 

If you would like more information regarding the Student 
Health Insurance Program you can call the Student and 
Academic Life Office at 978-665-3 1 30 or visit the following 
web sites: 

• Qualifying Student Health Insurance Program (QSHIP) 
at www.state.ma. us. /dhcfp/ , which offers information about 
the Student Health Insurance Program as mandated by 
the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Once entering the 
site click on "Student Insurance". 

• 2003-2004 Student Health Insurance Plan of the 
Massachusetts State College System offered by The 
Chickering group at www.cbickering.com. Click on 
"Customer Service" then enter the Fitchburg State College 
Policy Number 71 1 1 12 to access the college's specific 
policy. 

Substance Awareness/ 
Smart Choices Program 

The Office of Judicial Affairs manages the campuswide 
alcohol and drug prevention efforts. A range of supportive 
and educational services are provided to inform students of 
current facts and trends in alcohol and other drugs and 
promote alternative (alcohol-free) activities. We focus on 
reducing high risk drinking and increasing the awareness of 
the relationship between alcohol and violence. 

The office provides leadership opportunities for students, 
and offers a comprehensive training to volunteer Peer 
Educators. With the assistance of the Peer Educators, the 
Office achieves the following goals: 

• Facilitating educational workshops and training 

• Conducting yearly campus research 

• Alternative (nonalcoholic) activity programs 

• Co-sponsorship of campuswide awareness events such 
as Alcohol Awareness Wee, Major Speakers, and the 
Health fair 

• Coordinating events such as Alcohol Awareness Week, 
Aids/HIV Awareness Day, and the Great Smoke-out Day 

McKay Curriculum Resource 
Center 

The McKay Curriculum Resource Center provides faculty and 
students in Education Programs assistance in the research and 
development of curriculum materials, motivational tools, and 
evaluation and assessment devices. The Center houses 
textbooks, instructional aids, media materials, and computer 
software, which may be used in the classrooms at the 
elementary and secondary levels. 



Child Development Center 

The Fitchburg State College Child Development Center is 
an Early Childhood Program designed to meet the child 
care needs of the college community. The center-based 
program provides warm, loving care that meets the 
Standards and Areas of the National Academy of Early 
Childhood Programs. The Child Development Center is 
currently licensed to provide services to children between 
the ages of 2.9 years through six years. The enrollment 
priorities are as follows: students, faculty/staff, and 
community. The program is also a training site for students 
of the college in Early Childhood Education Teacher 
Training. 

The program is licensed by the Massachusetts Office for 
Children, and is located in the McKay Campus School 
Teacher Education Center. The center is open from 7:30 am 
to 5:30 pm Monday through Friday, on a year-round basis. 
The Fitchburg State College Child Development Center is 
managed by Associated Children's Services, Inc., a private 
agency. For more information about the program, call 978- 
343-9149. 



Campus Police Department 

The Campus Police Department is committed to 
maintaining the highest level of community policing with 
its basic philosophy being deeply rooted in service to the 
entire college community. The Department operates 24 
hours a day, 7 days a week utilizing cruiser, bike, and 
walking patrols of the entire campus and employs many 
students in various capacities. 

Student Security Team/Student Escort 
Service 

The Student Security Team of the Campus Police 
Department provides escorts anywhere on campus and 
within a ten minute walking radius of the campus. The 
Student Security Officers work in pairs and have direct 
radio communications with Campus Police Officers. Student 
escorts are available from 10pm to lam, seven nights a week 
during the school year. Escort requests at other times are 
handled by Campus Police Officers. To request an escort, 
please call (978)665-3111. 

Emergency Call Boxes 

Located throughout campus at strategic spots are emergency 
call boxes with blue lights that connect directly to Campus 
Police. An officer will immediately be dispatched to your 
location. 

Crime Prevention Programs and 
Presentations 

Campus Police makes numerous presentations to students on 
a whole range of issues including theft, rape, alcohol and 
drug abuse. The nationally recognized RAD. (Rape 
Aggression Defense) Program is offered free of charge to 
female staff, students and faculty by certified R.A.D. 
instructors from Campus Police. We also provide the 
campus with personal safety whistles, and to those 
individuals in more difficult situations, Screecher emergency 
alarms and 91 1 emergency phones. 



Operation Identification Program 

Record the serial numbers, model numbers, brand names and 
description of personal property. Engravers and forms are 
available from Campus Police to mark personal property as a 
theft deterrent. 

Parking Regulations 

Fitchburg State College provides parking facilities for over 
1,000 vehicles. The college requires that all vehicles 
utilizing the parking facilities must display the proper 
identification sticker. Stickers may be obtained at the 
Campus Police Department located in Russell Towers on 
Authority Drive. 

Resident students may have vehicles on campus. Along with 
a required sticker, residential students must adhere to 
specific parking regulations. 

Handicapped Parking Permit 

All permanently disabled motorists who wish to utilize the 
college's handicapped parking facilities need a parking 
permit from Campus Police as described above and also 
should display a State issued handicapped plates. Motor 
vehicles displaying a state issued parking permit or state 
issued plates are eligible to park in all designated college 
handicapped spots. 

Fitchburg State College Shuttle Bus 
and Additional Parking 

The Campus Police Department oversees the college shuttle 
service which continuously transports students, staff and 
faculty to and from the Wallace Civic Center parking lot 
(John Fitch Highway) and the main campus. The Fitchburg 
State College shuttle operates non-stop from 7am to 6:30pm 
on class days during the academic year. 

Motorist Assists 

Dead battery, keys locked in your vehicle are events with 
which Campus Police can provide assistance. Call 665-31 1 1 
or use an emergency call box. 

Campus Police Website 

For additional information about the Campus Police 
Department, please visit us at www.jsc.edu/campuspolice. 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Student Life: Beyond the Classroom 



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itchburg State College maintains that emotional, 
physical, social, and spiritual growth extends beyond 
the classroom and into the total campus environment. 
The college offers individuals and groups a variety of 
avenues for self-discovery and expression. Fitchburg 
State students who choose to become active in campus 
life, by accepting new commitments and adding 
responsibilities, often find avenues which will direct 
them toward their career and other life goals. They 
develop significant, enduring relationships with faculty, 
administrators, and other students, thus establishing a 
support network for years to come. 



New Student Orientation 

and Registration 

The orientation program at Fitchburg State College is 
designed to assist incoming, full-time students in making the 
transition from high school or work to college. Built on a 
concept of "student development," the orientation takes a 
holistic approach to addressing students' intellectual, 
emotional, physical, social, and spiritual dimensions. 

Coordinated by the Student and Academic Life Office, the 
orientation helps both students and their families with the 
transition to Fitchburg State College and gives them a 
feeling for and identity with Fitchburg State College, as 
follows: 

• Students focus on testing, academic advising, and 
registration for classes 

• Students are introduced to campus life and services 
available to them through a variety of programs and 
activities 

• The Family Program gives valuable information about the 
college, as well as tips for easing students' and family 
members' transition to Fitchburg State College 

The orientation program consists of one registration day 
during the summer and a 5 day program prior to classes in 
the fall. All new students receive advance notification and 
information about the program and are expected to attend. 



Campus Living 



On-Campus Housing 

Fitchburg State College offers a variety of housing options 
within the six residence halls/complexes. The halls range 
from traditional residence halls, high-rise buildings, suites 
and apartment style units. The residence halls at Fitchburg 
State provide more than just a roof over your head and three 
square meals a day. Each hall/complex has its own unique 
attributes but they all provide you a place to socialize, 
interact with your fellow students and most importantly, a 
place to study. 

Living on campus is also very affordable when you consider 
all the things included in your housing contract, such as 
utilities, maintenance, local telephone service that includes 
call waiting, and voice mail. All residence hall rooms are 
connected to the College computer network (one port per 
resident), which provides students with access to the 
internet and e-mail. Cable television along with a movie 
channel is also included in every room. Campus Living also 
offers a number of additional services such as a linen 
program, especially designed for the extra long beds in the 
residence hall rooms. 



■ 



All the residence halls are located conveniently on the 
perimeter of the main campus. The halls are grouped in 
two areas: East Campus, which consists of Mara Village, 
the Townhouses, and the Cedar Street House, West 
Campus, which consists of Aubuchon Hall, Russell Towers 
and Herlihy Hall. Each area is staffed by a full-time 
professional staff member who is responsible for 
overseeing the operations and staff. Each building is 
staffed with a building director and resident assistants 
(RA). All these individuals are available to assist students in 
working out living arrangements, guide residents in 
adjusting to campus life, and serve as educational and 
social programmers, building managers, and resource/ 
referral aides. 

Additional questions concerning on-campus housing 
should be directed to the Office of Campus Living, 
Aubuchon Hall 
978-665-3219. 



Student Activities, Organizations, 
and Volunteer Center 

Student Activities and 
Hammond Campus Center 

The Student Activities and Hammond Campus Center 
Office coordinates the co-curricular programs and activities, 
and the operations of the Campus Center building. The 
Department is committed to enhancing students' 
educational experiences through the development of, and 
participation in diverse programs and leadership activities. 
The Hammond Campus Center endeavors to serve as the 
focal point of the campus, bringing together members of the 
Fitchburg State community. 

The Student Activities Office and the Hammond Center are 
the hub of extracurricular events on campus. The office is 
committed to the principles of leadership development, 
enhancing student life outside the classroom, and to 
providing cultural and social opportunities. The offices 
maintain many resources about the college student 
organizations and the numerous opportunities open to 
individual students. 

Student Organizations 

Student Government Association (SGA) 

The purpose of the Student Government Association as set 
forth in its constitution is: 

". . . to be the democratic ruling body for and by the 
students, whose main goals are to unite the student body 
and address their various needs, to secure and defend the 
rights and freedoms necessary for our full participation in 
the educational process,- to ensure the civil rights of the 
membership, to be a voice for the student body to the 
faculty, administration, and the community at large." 

As the official voice of the students, the Student 
Government Association plays two important roles for the 
student body: 

• Participates in campuswide committees as well as state 
and national student organizations 

• Governs the many committees responsible for student 
affairs, activities, and clubs 



The governing body of SGA is the SGA Council, which is 
comprised of an Executive Board and Commuter's Board. 
Elections for positions on these boards are held every spring 
for the upperclass members and in the fall for freshmen. 

The SGA offers a number of services to its members, 
including programming, photocopying, and legal advice. 
Student participation is welcomed and encouraged. 

Clubs, Fraternities, Sororities, 
and Other Groups 

The college is proud to support a wide variety of student 
organizations that encompass a broad spectrum of interests. 
Participation in student organizations is encouraged to 
round out the academic experience and develop skills which 
will last a lifetime. 

Membership in college clubs and organizations is open to 
all full-time Fitchburg State College students who have paid 
the student activities fee. For meeting times and locations, 
contact the Campus Center/Student Activities Office. 

A list of the organizations on campus includes: 

Academic National Honor Societies 

Alpha Lamda Delta (Freshman Honor Society) 
Alpha Delta Omega (Human Services) 
Epsilon Pi Tau (Industrial Technology) 
Kappa Delta Pi (Education) 
Lambda Pi Eta (Communications) 
Omicron Delta Epsilon (Economics) 
Sigma Theta Tau (Nursing) 
Sigma Tau Delta (English) 
Phi Alpha Theta (History) 
Psi Chi (Psychology) 

Academic Interest Groups 

Associated Builders and Contractors 

Associated General Contractors 

Biology Club 

Chemistry Club 

Communications/Media Club 

Computer Science and Math Club 

Debate Club 

Early Childhood Club 

Elementary/Middle School Education Club 

English Club 

Geo Club 

Leadership Academy Club 

National Association of Homebuilders 

Nursing Student Association 

Psychology Club 

Special Education Club 

Fraternities 

Sigma Pi 

Sigma Tau Gamma 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Sororities 

Phi Sigma Sigma 
Sigma Sigma Sigma 
Alpha Signa Tau 

Residence Hail Government 

Residence Hall Association 

FSC Student Government 

Commuter Board 

SGA Senate 

SGA Executive Board 

SGA Class of 2005 

SGA Class of 2006 

SGA Class of 2007 

SGA Class of 2008 

SGA Residence Hall Representatives 

Special Interest Groups 

Black Student Union 

CED Celebrating Everyone's Differences 

Commuter Board 

Dance Club 

FSC Concert Band 

FSC Chamber Choir 

FSC Concert Choir 

FSC Jazz Band 

FSC Cheerleaders 

FSC Falcon Players 

FSC First Responders 

Haitian American Cultural Club 

Christian Fellowship at FSC 

Inter- Fraternity Sorority Council 

Martial Arts 

LaCrosse Club 

Latin American Student Organization 

MASSPIRG 

One in Ten and Friends 

Programs Committee 

SEAM 

Society of Motion Pictures and TV 

Society for Technical Communication 

STANCE 

The Point (Newspaper) 

Walt Disney Alumni Association 

WXPL Radio— 91.3 FM 

Volleyball Club 



Musical Groups 

Fitchburg State College offers a variety of musical 
programs for both the musician and the music lover. 

60-piece Concert Band performs music of all types, 
from the transcriptions of classics to contemporary 
sounds. 

Jazz-Rock Ensemble features big band, jazz, rock, and 
experimental music for stage bands. 

FSC Concert Choir and Chamber Choir performs a wide 
selection of mixed-voice choral pieces. 

Whenever instrumentalists are available, small ensembles of 
various instruments, including brass, woodwind, and 
recorder, get together to play. 

Religious Life 

Many churches, synagogues, and other religious 
congregations are located within walking distance of the 
campus. In addition, the Newman Center student parish, 
whose modern center was built with the help of Fitchburg 
State Industrial Arts students, provides a spiritual and social 
gathering place for many students. The Center, which hosts 
many student functions throughout the academic year, is 
located on Highland Avenue, adjacent to the college. 

Intercollegiate Athletics 

The Department of Athletics at Fitchburg State College, 
supported by the General Student Fee, offers every student 
an opportunity to participate on intercollegiate athletic 
teams. These opportunities enhance the academic 
experience by providing healthy competition at a high level 
of skill. 

Intercollegiate Sports 

The Fitchburg Falcons varsity teams have enjoyed national 
and regional recognition as highly competitive NCAA 
Division III teams. The fifteen varsity teams represent men 
and women in both indoor and outdoor competition. 

Fitchburg State is a member of eighteen intercollegiate 
Athletic Associations, which entitles successful teams to 
participate in tournament and championship play. Fitchburg 
State College is a charter member of the Massachusetts 
State College Athletic Conference (MASCAC), which 
includes seven other state colleges. 

The Student-Athlete Advisory Committee, composed of 
students and cochaired by the Director of Athletics, 
oversees the Intercollegiate sports program. They provide 
direction and insight to meet the interests, needs, and 
abilities of the student body in concert with Title IX and 
gender equity. 

The college offers three seasons of Intercollegiate varsity 
competition as follows: 

Fall Season 

Competition runs from early September through early 
November: 

• Men: football, soccer, cross-country 

• Women: soccer, field hockey, cross-country 



Winter Season 

Competition runs from November to early March; practice 
starts in late October or early November 

• Men: hockey, basketball, indoor track 

• Women: basketball, indoor track 

Spring Season 

Competition runs from late March through early May,- 
baseball and softball practices start in early February, and 
the teams often travel to Florida for spring break. Track and 
field practice starts once indoor track has finished its season. 

• Men: track and field, baseball 

• Women: track and field, softball 

Information regarding preseason tryouts and team meetings 
is available in the Athletic Department and on the Athletic 
Department website at www.fsc.edu/athletics. 

Athletic Eligibility 

Students who wish to participate on intercollegiate teams 
must be full-time students and be making "satisfactory 
progress toward a baccalaureate," defined as successful 
completion of: 

• 24 semester hours of course work prior to entering their 
third full-time semester 

• 48 semester hours of course work prior to entering their 
fifth full-time semester 

• 71 semester hours of course work prior to entering their 
seventh full-time semester 

Full or part-time status shall be determined by the end of 
the Add/Drop period. Students are required to successfully 
complete 24 semester hours of course work during their 
previous two full-time semesters to remain eligible. See 
Academic Policies and Procedures section for academic 
requirements. In addition to Fitchburg State College 
academic requirements, students must meet the 
requirements of the NCAA, ECAC, and MASCAC. 



Recreational Services 

The Recreation Center is the "Hub" for active Recreational 
activities at the College. Activities offered within the 
Center are both structured and informal, and are designed to 
satisfy the needs of all students. A dynamic Recreation 
Services program is offered at the Recreation Center, 
Coolidge Park, and through the Outdoor Adventure 
Program. Recreation Services offers opportunities for all 
students to participate in a wide range of activities. 

The sports offered help to meet the recreational needs and 
requests of the college community and include: volleyball, 
floor hockey, basketball, wiffleball, soccer, wallyball, 
softball, inner-tube water polo, racquetball, flag football and 
bowling. Promotional flyers are posted throughout the 
campus during the year to inform students as to when they 
should submit their team entry forms for each sport. Team 
Entry forms are available at the Recreation Center and in 
the Hammond Campus Center affixed to the Recreational 
Activities bulletin board, and should be submitted to the 
Assistant Director for Programming. 

Students who prefer something more informal and non- 
structured have many opportunities to use the (14 hours 
per day of choices) state-of-the-art fitness center, the 
private dance/aerobics studio, the aquatic center, the 
arena, the racquetball courts or the suspended jogging 
track. Favorite activities are: group fitness classes, pick-up 
basketball, club volleyball, racquetball, handball, wallyball, 
weight training (free weights and selectorized circuits), 
cardiovascular training (steppers, treadmills, elliptical 
trainers, bicycles), lap swimming, water basketball, water 
aerobics, aqua jogging, fitness walking, and much more! 

Recreation Services Department 665-3683. 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Student Code of Conduct 

and Discipline System 

Student Code of Conduct 

Fitchburg State College recognizes that students or guests, 
as members of society and citizens of the United States of 
America, are entitled to respect, consideration, and 
guaranteed freedoms of speech, assembly, and association 
under the U.S. Constitution. The college further recognizes 
the students' right within the institution to freedom of 
inquiry and the responsible use of the services and facilities 
of the college. 

Students at Fitchburg State College have a responsibility to 
act in a manner that promotes the well-being, respect, 
safety, and security of all members of the college 
community. Behavior, whether on or off-campus, that calls 
into question a student's suitability as a member of the 
academic community, or places college members at risk, will 
not be tolerated. Such behavior will result in disciplinary 
action ranging from a warning to dismissal. 

The complete text of the Student Code of Conduct is found 
in the Undergraduate Student Handbook which is available at the 
Student and Academic Life Office. 

Student Discipline System 

The goal of the Student Discipline System is to support 
the educational mission of the college by insuring that an 
atmosphere of acceptance, curiosity, and integrity is 
maintained on the campus. By educating and enforcing 
mature and responsible behavior, the Student Discipline 
System promotes students' respect for the rights of others, 
their receptivity to new and challenging ideas, and civil and 
courteous behavior. The complete text of the Student 
Discipline System is found in the Undergraduate Student 
Handbook, which is available at the Student and Academic 
Life Office. 



Good Neighbor Policy 

Students who reside in or visit the college neighborhood are 
expected to demonstrate respect and concern for all 
members of the local community. As such, Fitchburg State 
College expects students to demonstrate responsible 
citizenship in the local neighborhood by participating in 
any of the several community service opportunities available 
for students. Contact the Volunteer Center for more 
information. 

To support the goal of being "good neighbors," the 
following conduct (and any other of a like sort) will not be 
tolerated and will constitute violations of college policy for 
which students are subject to being disciplined whether the 
conduct occurs on or off the campus: 

• making excessive or unreasonable noise 

• sponsoring parties for profit (the illegal sale or 
distribution of alcoholic beverages, which may include 
the use of tickets, tee-shirts, mugs, cups and/or any other 
items as a price or condition of admission) 

• sponsoring excessively large parties 

• serving minors alcohol 

• disorderly conduct, harassment of neighbors, defacing or 
damaging property, throwing objects out windows 

• public drinking, public urination 

• using, selling, or distributing illegal drugs 

• interfering with the City of Fitchburg Police or utility 
agencies in the performance of their duties 

• using, selling, manufacturing, or distributing fake IDs 

Students who violate college policy and/or federal, state, or 
local law and, by so doing, call into question their 
suitability as members of the college community, are subject 
to the ruling of the Student Discipline System in addition to 
the appropriate body of federal, state, or local law. If found 
responsible, students are subject to sanctions up to and 
including loss of residence or suspension or dismissal from 
the college. 



Campus and Facilitib 




Directions to the College 

Fitchburg State College is located in a residential section of 
Fitchburg, the urban center of North Worcester County. It is 
approximately 25 miles north of Worcester, 50 miles west of 
Boston and 15 miles south of New Hampshire. The compact 
campus of 32 buildings on 48 acres is easily accessible by 
car, bus, or train from all areas of New England. 

By car: From within Massachusetts: Take Interstate 91, 190 
or 495 to Rte. 2 to exit 32. Follow Rte. 1 3 north (toward 
Lunenburg) to Rte. 2A (about four miles), then take a left 
toward Fitchburg. At the intersection of 2A and the John 
Fitch Highway (about 1-1/4 miles), turn right, pass through 
a set of blinking lights and, at the next stop light, turn left 
onto Pearl Street. The college is located about 1/4 mile up 
Pearl Street. 

From New Hampshire: Take Rte. 12, 13 or 31 to Fitchburg. 
Follow city map insert. 

From Connecticut: Take either Interstate 91 or 84 to the 
Massachusetts Turnpike, exiting north on to Interstate 290 
in Auburn. Follow 290 to Interstate 190 north to Rte. 2, exit 
immediately at exit 32 and follow directions given above for 
Massachusetts locations. 

From Rhode Island: Take Rte. 146 north to Interstate 290 
through Worcester exiting onto Interstate 190. Follow 
instructions for Massachusetts locations. 

By bus or train: Daily MBTA trains to and from Boston stop 
on Main Street in Fitchburg. Cross Main Street to North 
Street. The college is three blocks north. See insert map. 

Trailways buses from Pittsfield, Springfield and Worcester 
also stop on Main Street near the MBTA Station. Follow 
walking directions above. 

Buses from Boston stop at the intersection of Rtes. 2 and 12. 
Cab or local bus service to the college is available from that 
stop. 

If you have any questions, please call 978-345-2151. 




t^O* v-A 






COLLEGE CATALOG 



Buildings and Grounds 

Located in the unique three-mountain area known as the 
Montachusett region, Fitchburg State College features a 
traditional New England quadrangle graced by historic brick 
buildings. Residence units, academic buildings, the library/ 
campus center, auditorium/theater, dining commons, 
recreation center, and other facilities are all within a short 
walking distance from one another. Just north of the campus 
is a 36-acre athletic and recreational area as well as the 
McKay Campus School. Other outdoor recreational 
opportunities are available in the 120-acre conservation area 
spanning three neighboring communities. A new athletic 
and recreation complex on the south end of campus 
officially opened in September 2000. 



Campus Facilities 

All students are encouraged to utilize the many campus 
services and facilities available, including the computer 
center, athletic facilities, library, and many others. Access to 
these facilities often requires a valid One Card, which can 
be obtained at ACMS on the second floor of the Conlon 
Industrial Arts Building. ID Cards should be validated every 
semester. 

The Amelia V. Gallucci-Cirio Library 

The Amelia V. Gallucci-Cirio Library, www.fsc.edu/library, 
located in the Hammond Building, is a comprehensive 
information center dedicated to the educational 
development of students. A knowledgeable staff and easily 
accessible print and electronic collection promotes the 
interaction between students and resources available to 
them. The main library serves the undergraduate and 
graduate programs. A second library, located in the McKay 
Campus School, serves the McKay teachers, staff, and 
children. There is easy off-campus access to databases for all 
students and a wide variety of services for distributed 
learning students (www.jsc.edu/library/distance.hthn) including 
on-site instruction, document delivery, online and voice mail 
reference, and research guides. 

Library Services 

Library Hours 

Monday-Thursday, 8:00 AM- 10 PM, Friday, 8:00 AM-5 PM ; 
Saturdays, noon-6 PM ; Sundays, 1 PM-10 PM 

Semester hours, holiday hours, exam hours, winter session 
hours, and summer hours are posted in the library, on the 
Library Home page and at ext. 4478. 

Services 

• Access to the library's services are available from any 
computer on and off-campus via the Library Home Page. 

• On-line Public Access Catalog, containing the listing of 
Fitchburg State College's 235,000 books and 1,400 
periodical titles. 

• Easy access to 10,500 full text on-line periodical titles 

• Free access to approximately 87 electronic on-line 
databases (encyclopedias, indexes/abstracts, directories, 
etc.) representing all disciplines on campus. 

• Approximately 40 WEB sites representing all disciplines 
on campus. 



• Resources in Education Collection (ERIC), a 
comprehensive updated Education library system 
consisting of 436,000 items, including on-line access fro 
1995 to the present. 

• A Distance Learning button for library services on the 
Library Home Page. 

• Six month borrowing period for faculty. 

• Interlibrary loans for students and faculty. 

• Faculty and students have free borrowing privileges with 
the other 29 Massachusetts Public Higher Education 
Libraries and the academic libraries of Worcester county. 

• The Library Instruction Program is housed in a state of 
the art classroom. 

• Seventy-five hours of reference desk availability. 

• Electronic Library Reserves-A WEB based reserves service 
allowing access from any computer location. 

• The Special Collections Department houses the college's 
archives and the manuscript collections of Robert 
Cormier and Robert Salvatore 

Students are encouraged to call for complete schedule 
information. Service for the collection is provided by five 
professional librarians, who assist at the Library Information 
Desk and also conduct library instruction classes for the 
college community. To arrange for such a session students 
can contact the staff at the Library Information Desk at 978- 
665-3223. 

Campus Center 

The Campus Center serves as a gathering place for both 
commuter and resident students. Located in the Hammond 
Building, the Center's facilities include: 

• Campus Information Center 

• Commuter Cafeteria 

• Art Gallery 

• Ground Zero Game Room 

• College Bookstore 

• Underground Pub 

• Post Office 

• Meeting and Function Rooms 

• Offices of the Student Government Association, the 
student newspaper, the Point, and the Student Leadership 
Club Room, and other student organization offices. 

• Volunteer Center 

• Leadership Commons 

Computer Facilities 

Campus Pipeline 

Campus Pipeline is an online gateway to personalized 
information, news, e-mail, and communication tools for 
students, faculty and staff. In addition to checking your e- 
mail, you can access a calendar tool, check campus events 
and access student and faculty services through BannerWeb. 

Computer Labs 

The hours and locations of open computer labs are listed on 
the website and are updated each semester. These hours are 
subject to minor changes due to course additions/deletions 
and because of individual workshops, training and special 
classes. 



Campus Map 



1 Conlon Building 

1A Fine Arts 

lB Industrial Technology 
Communications/Media 

1 Weston Auditorium 

3 Condike Science 

4 Sanders Administration 

5 Newman Center 

6 Alumni/Development House 

7 Anthony Receiving 

8 Parkinson Hall 



9 Dupont Facilities Building 

10 Holmes Dining Commons 

1 1 Edgerly Hall 
!2PercivalHall 

1 3 Thompson Hall 

1 4 Hammond Campus Center/Library 

1 5 Miller Hall 

1 6 Recreation Center 

1 7 McKay Campus School 

1 8 Athletic Fields 

19 Highland House 



Residence Hails 

A Aubuchon Residence Hall 
B Russell Towers 
C Herlihy Residence Hall 
D Townhouse Apartments 
E Mara Village 



Hi 




For questions regarding Hardware/Software support in the 
open labs contact the Information Technology Service 
Center at x4500. 

Hammond PC Lab 

The lab currently has 25 PCs and 10 G3 Macintosh 
computers. 

• Hours for the Hammond PC Lab can vary depending on 
holidays/vacations. The lab schedule follows the Library 
Hours. Closing time is one-half hour before the library 
closes. 

Hammond Mac Lab 

This lab contains 25 Power Macintosh computers. 

• Hours for the Hammond PC Lab can vary depending on 
holidays/vacations. The lab schedule follows the Library 
Hours. Closing time is one-half hour before the library 
closes. 

McKay C- 1 75/C- 1 77 PC Lab 

This lab features 20 Pentium computers and 10 Pentium PCs 
and a mobile instructor podium equipped with a computer, 
video projector and sound system. The two computer 
classrooms are alternately scheduled to ensure the 
availability for classroom teaching and individual use at all 
time. 



McKay B- 147 Mac Lab 

This lab features 21 C3 Macintosh computers, a ceiling 

mount video projector, a VCR and surround sound system. 

• Closed holidays 

E-Mail 

Faculty, staff and students at the college are entitled to an 
fsc.edu e-mail address. To apply for an account call or visit 
the IT Service Center. 

Service Center 

The IT Service Center is the clearinghouse for all campus 
technical support issues. Faculty and staff can call the ITSC 
for phone and onsite service for the following: 

• Banner account processing and support 

• Web/Banner account maintenance and service 

• Pipeline user support 

• Blackboard account support 

• Login/password administration 

• E-mail account distribution, support and upgrades 

• Printer, peripheral and hardware support 

• Software installation, support and upgrades 

• Antivirus software distribution/administration 

• Hardware/software quotes and recommendations 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Information Technology Systems 

IT Systems is responsible for managing the campus 
network and administrative software development and 
maintenance. 

Network Operations Center 

• Administrative (AdminNet) and resident (ResNet) 
network management and support 

• Managed (firewall and bandwidth) Internet access 

• Telephone systems maintenance and support 

Data Center 

• Administrative server management and support (Banner, 
Web, E-mail, etc.) 

• Departmental server hosting 

Software Development 

• Banner maintenance 

• Database administration 

• Applications development and programming 

Adaptive Computing Lab 

The Adaptive Computing Lab addresses those students with 
special computing needs. Housed in the Hammond Building 
(third floor), it contains equipment needed to provide large 
print, braille, voice-operated computing, talking scanners, 
and other software and hardware. 

Computer Science Department 

The Computer Science Department has additional 
equipment dedicated for use in that discipline, including: 

• Electronic hardware and prototyping equipment to 
support both analog and digital laboratories 

• Small microprocessor systems that allow students to work 
on design experiments that would be impossible or, at 
least impractical, on larger computer systems 

• Computer networks and labs including SPARC 
workstations running Solaris, and Intel PCs with 
Windows and a Novell network 

This provides students with state-of-the-art systems and 
design equipment currently being used in industry. These 
computer laboratories also provide the students with access 
to the Internet as well as a Web server for developing their 
own home pages. 

Visit Fitchburg State College's home page at http-.// 
www.fsc.edu 



McKay Campus School, Teacher 
Education Center 

The McKay Campus Schools serves as the Teacher 
Education Center at Fitchburg State College, as well as a 
public elementary school for the city of Fitchburg. This dual 
mission adds a uniqueness to the teaching and learning 
atmosphere at McKay. This collaboration with higher 
education is a partnership that brings professionals together 
in our school setting to share: 

• responsibility for the preparation of new teachers 

• the professional development of experienced classroom 
teachers 

• the professional development of university faculty serving 
as teacher educators 

• the support of research directed at improvement of 
practice 

• enhanced student learning for our elementary students 

Media 

IT provides support for a variety of media services and 
equipment including: 

• Campus cable TV 

• Multimedia equipment check in/out 

• Equipment repairs and troubleshooting 

• Multimedia classroom support and cart support 

• Media production/event coverage 

Telecommunications 

IT Systems is responsible for managing, servicing, and 
maintaining the campus telecommunication system. 
Services include: 

• Daily functioning of all telephones 

• Add voicemail for all students 

• Coordinate hardware installations and modifications 

• Install cable lines as necessary 

On-Campus Housing 

A variety of resident housing options are available for 
students who choose to live on campus. The six campus 
residence halls provide housing for more than 1400 
students. All residence halls are centrally located to 
classrooms, offices, the library, computer laboratories, 
auditoriums, and the Campus Center. Situated adjacent to 
the residence halls is Holmes Dining Commons, where 
various meal plans are offered to residence hall students. For 
specific information on resident housing, please refer to the 
Campus Living section of the catalog. 



One Card 

In September 2003 the new "One Card" system replaced 
the old campus IDs. The new digital identification cards 
is used for library privileges, access to the Recreation 
Center and Chartwell's dining, and limited access to 
residence halls. 

In the future, One Card will be used for printing and 
copying services as well as vending and laundry machines. 

Athletic/ Recreation Facilities 

Fitchburg State College has a wide range of indoor and 
outdoor athletic and recreation facilities. 

• Recreation Center: This state-of-the-art recreational 
facility opened in September 2000. The facility includes 
the following areas: 

A 1 ,000 seat NCAA Basketball/Volleyball arena 

Three teaching stations/intramural courts 

Suspended Jogging Track 

25 yard, 6 lane Swimming Pool 

A Dance/Aerobics Studio 

Fitness Center (Circuit Weight Machines, Free Weight 
Machines, and Cardiovascular Machines) 

2 Racquetball/Handball Courts 

Classrooms 

Exercise Science Laboratory 

Sports Medicine Center 

Teaching Stations 

Locker rooms, Laundry, and Storage Areas 

Athletic Department Offices 

Exercise and Sport Science Department Offices 

Recreation Services Offices 

• Robert Elliot Complex: Located on Pearl Hill Road, the 
complex is the site of the outdoor athletic facilities, 
including the baseball, soccer, football, and field hockey 
fields, a chem-turf track and tennis courts. 

• George Wallace Civic Center: The ice hockey team 
practices and competes at the Civic Center on John Fitch 
Highway. 

• McKay Campus School: Some intramural events are held 
in the gymnasium at the Campus School. 

The Athletic Department schedules the use of outdoor 
campus athletic facilities, while the Director of Recreation 
Services schedules the use of the various areas within the 
Recreation Center. 



Biological Sciences Nature Preserve 

Nadine Martel Nature Preserve consists of 3.2 acres of 
land adjacent to the McKay School campus on Rindge 
Road. The parcel was given to the college in 1999 by 
Nadine Cookman Martel of Fitchburg for use as an 
environmental laboratory in undergraduate Ecology and 
graduate Mammalogy coursework. Students have access 
to an ideal stream habitat for research in Limnology, 
Botany and Ornithology. 

Outdoor Recreation in the 
Montachusett Area 

The name "Montachusett" is a conglomeration of the names 
for the three mountains that surround the College. Mt. 
Monadnock, Mt. Watatic, and Mt. Wachusett offer trails for 
hiking and slopes for skiing. Students are encouraged to 
take advantage of this rugged terrain with free rentals of 
cross-country skis, canoes, and tents from the Campus 
Center/Student Activities department. Students may also 
join the FSC Outing Club, which sponsors outdoor trips. 

Animals on Campus 

Due to health and safety considerations, no animals are 
allowed on campus or in campus buildings at any time. The 
only exceptions are assist animals and laboratory animals. 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



The Curriculum 




A 



J Fitchburg State College, each curriculum or course 
oj study has been constructed to help students develop the 
intellectual skills needed to analyze, interpret, and learn. 
The purpose oj every curriculum is to assist students in 
recognizing the possibilities as well as the problems oj their 
changing world, to instill within them a moral awareness 
oj their responsibilities toward improving the Quality oj 
human lije, and to prepare themjor careers which will 
enrich their lives as they contribute to the lives oj others. 
Each curriculum includes a Liberal Arts and Sciences 
program and courses in a major jield oj study. The 
purpose oj the Liberal Arts and Sciences requirements is to 
develop, through a variety oj academic disciplines, a set oj 
well-rounded skills that are analytic and Quantitative as 
well as verbal and aesthetic. By concentrating in a major 
jield oj interest, students acquire knowledge ojboth the 
theoretical and the practical aspects oj their subject. 



Incoming Students: 

The Readiness Program 

All first-year and transfer students will be tested or 
otherwise evaluated upon entrance to Fitchburg State 
College to determine their proficiencies in reading, writing, 
and mathematics. (Exams are scheduled both days and 
evenings throughout the academic year.) Test results may 
indicate skill areas which will be strengthened by a 
readiness program to provide new students with a solid and 
equal start to their college careers. 

Readiness Program/Comprehensive 
Courses and Requirements 

ENGL OlOO Basic College Writing — required for first-year 
students who score 7 or lower on essay and if they have no 
transfer credit equivalent to Writing I and/or Writing II. 

Students who score 12 on the essay will be exempted from 
Writing I and should enroll in ENGL 1200, Writing II. 

MATH 0100 Basic Mathematics I — required for students 
who score below 50 on the Placement Exam. 

MATH 0200 Basic Mathematics II — required for students 
who score below 82 on the Placement Exam. Transfer 
students who fail the mathematics examination will not be 
required to take these courses unless they wish to enroll in a 
mathematics course at the 1000-level or above. 



Credit for READ 0100, ENGL 0100, MATH 0100 and 
MATH 0200 is considered Institutional Credit only, that 
is, the credit will not count toward graduation, but will 
count toward full-time status for purposes of financial aid 
and athletic eligibility. Additionally, the grades received in 
these courses will be counted in each student's Grade 
Point Average. 

Foreign Language Placement Exam 
Requirement 

This required assessment is designed to assist students to 
achieve their foreign language education goals. French, 
German, and Spanish tests are administered through the 
Internet. Immediately after the test, you will receive your 
results and be advised as to the proper Fitchburg State 
College foreign language course in which you should enroll 
based on your placement score. 

Latin is a pencil and paper exam. A Latin score that places 
the student higher than Intermediate Level 2 satisfies the 
Foreign Language graduation requirement for the Bachelor 
of Arts degree or the Leadership Academy program. All 
other Latin scores will be used to recommend the 
appropriate level Latin course that can be taken through the 
Worcester College Consortium during the Fall or Spring 
semesters. Information on these courses can be located at 
http://www.cowc.org. Fitchburg State College does not 
currently offer courses in Latin. 

Students planning to take French, German, Spanish, or Latin 
are required to take a placement test if you meet one of the 
following conditions: 



• Completed a high school level French, German, 
Spanish, or Latin course 

• One of these languages is your native language or you 
have had experience with the language 

Students who have not had any formal or informal 
experience with a foreign language do not need to take the 
placement test, but may register for French for Beginners 
(FREN 1000); German for Beginners (GER 1000); Spanish 
for Beginners (SPAN 1000), or Italian for Beginners (ITAL 
1000). 

Common Graduation Requirements 

In order to be eligible to graduate with a baccalaureate 
degree from Fitchburg State College, the following general 
requirements must be met: 

• Successful completion of an appropriate discipline-based 
evaluation chosen by the department and approved by 
the Vice President for Academic Affairs 

• Successful completion of at least 120 semester hours of 
course work,- 45 of these must be attained in residence 
(normally including the senior year) 

• A cumulative gpa of 2.0 or higher 

• A minimum of 2.0 average in major course of study* 

• An application for graduation must be filed with the 
Registrar's Office by January 1 of the year of anticipated 
graduation 

• Some majors require a major gpa higher than 2.0 for 

graduation. 

Graduation 

Degrees are awarded by Fitchburg State College in January 
and May of each year. 

Students may petition the Associate Vice President for 
Academic Affairs to participate in the annual graduation 
ceremony if they have a maximum of two courses, up to 12 
credits to complete. 

Liberal Arts and Sciences Program 
Requirement 

Of the 120 semester hours needed to graduate, candidates 
must complete a minimum of 60 hours satisfying the 
requirements of the Liberal Arts and Sciences Program, 
which includes the Readiness in English and Mathematics (if 
necessary) and the Constitution requirement (for teacher 
education majors only) as well as the following components: 

• Quantitative/Scientific Cluster ("Q" symbol in course 
schedule) — 4 courses, 1 must be a mathematics course 
beyond the readiness level, one must be a science lab. 
(NB: 4 courses, regardless of whether they carry three or 
four hours of credit, must be completed) 

• Ideas and Events Cluster ("I" symbol in course schedule) — 
three courses, one must have a historical perspective 

• Human Behavior Cluster ("B" symbol in course 
schedule) — 2 courses 

• Literature, Language, and Arts Cluster ("L" symbol in 
course schedule) — 4 courses, 1 must be in Literature and 1 
must be in Arts 

• Writing I & II-ENGL 1 1 00 and 1 200, or their equivalent if 
taken at another institution 

• Health and Fitness — (See Health and Fitness Requirement 
under Exercise and Sport Science Program) 



• Junior/Senior Writing — specific requirement(s) defined by 
the department of the student's major 

• Computer Literacy — specific requirement(s) defined by 
the department of the student's major 

• Speaking/Listening — specific requirement(s) defined by 
the department of the student's major 

• Interdisciplinary ("IDIS" or departmental prefix in 
schedule) — two courses, one of which must be taken in 
the freshman year. These courses can simultaneously meet 
the requirements in content clusters 

• Multicultural ("C" symbol in course schedule) — 2 courses, 
which can simultaneously meet the requirements in 
content clusters 

• Intermediate and Advanced Requirement — 3 courses at 
the Intermediate or Advanced level in a Liberal Arts or 
Science discipline outside one's major. These courses can 
simultaneously meet the requirements in content clusters 

• Liberal Arts and Sciences Electives — 4 courses chosen 
from among those designated as part of the Liberal Arts 
and Sciences Program 

Candidates should be aware that the following restrictions 
apply with respect to fulfilling their Liberal Arts and 
Sciences requirements: 

• Credits earned in one course cannot be divided 

• Credits earned toward graduation cannot be counted 
twice, even though courses that satisfy Liberal Arts and 
Sciences requirements may sometimes fulfill the 
requirements of one's major course of study 

Certain majors specify which courses must be taken to 
satisfy Liberal Arts and Sciences requirements. Students 
should read the section pertaining to their selected major 
carefully before registering for classes. 

Additional course work required for 
graduation from individual programs and 
certificates 

Teacher certification or initial provisional certification 
requires knowledge of the Federal Constitution and that of 
the Commonwealth. Candidates may fulfill it by 
successfully completing one of the following courses: 

HIST 1400 United States History I 

HIST 1500 United States History II 

POLS 1500 State and Urban Government 

POLS 1000 U.S. Government 

Leadership Academy Honors Program 

Leadership Academy Honors Program students complete 
LAS requirements through a specialized set of courses. See 
Leadership Academy. 

Freshman Foundation Year 

The courses required in a full-time, undergraduate student's 
first year demonstrate that the Liberal Arts and Sciences 
program offers content and skills that are significant in the 
development of critical thinking and serve as the foundation 
for further learning in major areas. Along with fulfilling the 
Freshman Foundation courses as outlined below, every 
incoming freshman will be required to read two books that 
are related to a designated theme. 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Freshman Foundation Year Program 

• Writing I and Writing II 

• Liberal Arts and Sciences courses in at least three clusters 

• An Interdisciplinary course 

• Additional courses chosen in consultation with advisor 

Major Course of Study 

Candidates must choose a major course of study, either at 
the time of enrollment or before the end of their sophomore 
year. The requirements of the major vary from 33 to 63 
semester hours. Students must formally apply to their major 
by filling out a form available from the Academic Advising 
Center, Registrar or from the chair of the department. 

Changing a Major or Degree Program 

Students may change their major or degree program as long 
as they can meet the requirements for their new major. 
Frequently changing one's major increases the amount of 
time required to complete the baccalaureate program, and 
not all programs (e.g., Nursing) can accept applicants who 
wish to transfer to that field. 

Programs having requirements for internal transfer are 
Communications/Media, Human Services, Clinical 
Laboratory Science, Nursing, and Education. 

Double Major 

Degree candidates wishing to earn a baccalaureate with two 
majors must satisfy the requirements of both programs, even 
if doing so requires more than 1 20 semester hours of study. 
All students receiving a BSEd must also complete a major in 
an Arts and Sciences discipline. 

Double major candidates 

• Enroll for the second major as they did for the first 

• Are assigned an advisor in each major 

• Select which degree is to be granted — the BA, BS, or 
BSEd — since only one degree is permissible 

Academic Minor 

The academic minor is an ideal way to explore a field other 
than that of one's major. 

Minors are offered in African-American studies, art, biology, 
business administration, chemistry, computer science, 
criminal justice, dance, economics, English, French, 
geography, German, graphics, history, industrial/ 
organizational psychology, industrial science, international 
studies, mathematics, music, philosophy, physical 
education, political science, psychology, public service 
management, Russian studies, sociology, Spanish, special 
education, theater, and women's studies. (Not all minors are 
available in the evening.) 

Although the minimum number of credits required for a 
minor is fifteen, the amounts vary significantly from 
discipline to discipline, as do the prerequisites. See the 
"Undergraduate Programs" section of the catalog for further 
information. 



Degrees Offered 



Fitchburg State College offers three undergraduate degrees: 

• Bachelor of Arts 

• Bachelor of Science 

• Bachelor of Science in Education 

Each degree has its own specific requirements for 
graduation. Students may be awarded only one degree 
unless they have fulfilled the provisions for a double degree. 

Double Degree 

Students wishing to earn two bachelor's degrees may do so 
by satisfying the degree requirements for the two programs 
prior to receiving the second degree. They must earn 30 
semester hours credit beyond the 1 20 hours required for the 
first degree. 

Three-Year Degree Program 

In 1996, Fitchburg State College began offering selected 
students the opportunity to complete their bachelor's degree 
in three years. This program is primarily for full-time, 
undergraduate students in the Interdisciplinary Studies 
major, although some other majors may be available. 

Students who enter this program must have completed at 
least six credits through Dual Enrollment, Advanced 
Placement examinations, CLEP examination, or transfer 
credits. 

For further information, contact the Admissions Office. 

Program Alternatives 

Students may take advantage of a number of program 
options designed to help degree candidates tailor their 
course of studies to best suit their individual needs. 

Leadership Academy Honors Program 

The Academy is a coordinated four-year honors program 
offering an enriched curriculum for full-time undergraduate 
students with very high academic achievements. 

Freshmen are invited to join the Leadership Academy based 
on their high school grades and preparation, SAT scores, 
rank in class, and leadership potential. 

For further information, see the Leadership Academy 
Program in the Undergraduate Day Programs section. 

Transfer students, those transferring from other two or four- 
year colleges, and students who have been at Fitchburg 
State College for one semester to a year may apply for 
acceptance to the Leadership Academy. These students will 
typically complete the Leadership Minor. External transfer 
students should contact Admissions for acceptance. Internal 
transfers should contact the Director of the Leadership 
Academy. 



Life Experience Credit Award Program 

The Life Experience Credit Award program (LECAP) 
recognizes that some students may have acquired 
knowledge and skills through life experiences as well as 
through formal credit courses. This program allows students 
the opportunity to ask that their life experiences be 
evaluated as educational experiences and credited toward an 
undergraduate college degree. Credit may be awarded for 
academically verifiable college-level learning acquired 
through professional experiences, service, noncredit 
structured and community learning and educational travel. 
For further information call 978-665-3321 or 978-665-3319. 

Independent Study 

Independent Study allows students to step outside of course 
offerings and explore a specialized area of study in a 
challenging and new environment. Students are encouraged 
to seek out Independent Study opportunities under the 
guidance and supervision of a professor in whose 
specialization they wish to study. A regularly offered course 
cannot be given as independent study. Independent study 
programs and the amount of credit earned from them must 
meet the approval of the professor, the advisor, and 
department chair involved, with final approval coming from 
the Dean of Curriculum and Instruction. A gpa of 2.5 is 
required for application. Usually, only three credits of 
independent study per semester may be attempted. 

Directed Study 

Directed study allows a student to carry out a non-research 
project or participate in an activity under the direct 
supervision of a faculty member. In exceptional 
circumstances, it can be used to offer an existing courses to 
an individual student. All directed studies require a 2.5 
cumulative gpa, written application from student, and 
approval of faculty sponsor, advisor, department chair and 
Dean of Curriculum and Instruction. 

Study Abroad Opportunities 

Through the Office of International Education, Fitchburg 
State College students have the exciting opportunity to 
study in another country. Affordable semester and summer 
programs are offered in several locations throughout the 
world including the U.K., Australia, Spain, France, Ireland, 
Finland and Quebec. Several types of financial aid can be 
applied to most of these programs. Students work with the 
Director of International Education, their advisor and the 
registrar's office to have their coursework from an overseas 
university approved before they leave the U.S. For further 
information, please contact the Office of International 
Education at 978/665-3089. 

CAPS: College Academic Program Sharing 

CAPS allows students the opportunity to enroll in up to 30 
semester hours of courses at another state college without 
going through formal registration procedures, thus giving 
them a chance to enjoy a more varied educational 
experience. 

To participate in this program, degree candidates must: 

• Have attained sophomore status 

• Have spent at least one semester in residence at Fitchburg 
State College 

• Be in good academic standing 



• Attain approval to enroll in CAPS from the chair of their 
major department prior to registering for the semester 

• Contact the Registrar's Office for approval if their major 
is undeclared 

• File a CAPS request with the Registrar's Office 

Worcester Center for Professional Crafts 

Fitchburg State College and the Worcester Center for 
Professional Crafts have a collaborative arrangement by 
which students may take courses in the Liberal Arts and 
Sciences at Fitchburg State College, and may receive credit 
under the Fitchburg State College transfer policy for courses 
taken at the Worcester Center for Professional Crafts. 

Indian Hill Music Center 

Fitchburg State College and the Indian Hill Music Center 
have a collaborative agreement by which students may take 
private lesson instruction at Indian Hill for college credit. 
See department chair, Humanities, for more information. 

College-Level Examination Program (CLEP), 
Defense Activity for Nontraditional 
Educational Support (DANTES), 
Departmental Examinations 

Students entering Fitchburg State College with college-level 
training or experience can be tested on college course 
material to earn credit toward their degree. The Fitchburg 
State College examination program is especially valuable for 
individuals who have had learning experiences outside the 
college classroom (employment experience, life experience, 
independent study, etc.) which may come to bear upon their 
formal academic training. 

On the CLEP exams, Fitchburg State College adheres to the 
standards established by the American Council on 
Education granting credit for tests on which a score of 50 
has been achieved. This credit is awarded only to students 
enrolled at degree programs at Fitchburg State College. 

For further information on the Fitchburg State College 
examination program, contact the Career Services Center, 
3rd floor, Hammond Building, 978-665-3151. 

It is possible to gain up to 60 college credits through the 
program for all majors except Criminal Justice. Criminal 
Justice majors can earn no more than 1 2 credits through 
examination. 

Advanced Placement 

For students who score 3, 4, or 5 on the Advanced 
Placement Examination, the College grants advanced 
placement status and credit in the area tested. See the 
Academic Glossary for the Advanced Placement Courses 
accepted. 

Professional Development Center 

Fitchburg State College believes that excellence in 
education practice must be supported beyond the 
conferring of degrees and professional licensure. The 
Professional Development Center (PDC) is a key element 
of the College's total strategy to support educators during 
the critical years of induction into the education 
profession and beyond. To address this goal, the PDC 
offers an extensive array of high quality professional 
development activities to public and private school 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



teachers, counselors, administrators, and other school 
personnel in North Central Massachusetts. The activities 
of the Center range from the identification and provision 
of enrichment courses, workshops, conferences, and other 
activities to aid educators in strategic planning, 
implementing school system restructuring, initiating and 
accomplishing systemic reform, and enriching school 
curriculum. 

In addition to providing leadership in district staff 
development planning, the Professional Development 
Center sponsors and manages major conferences on Best 
Teaching Strategies, conferences for VocationalATechnical 
High School Teachers and, in concert with the College 
Board, training for Advanced Placement High School 
Teachers. 

The existence of a responsive PDC at Fitchburg State 
College enables the College's education programs to 
collaborate with individual schools or school districts on 
critical issues. Planned PDC activities provide ongoing and 
continuously enhanced support services for Fitchburg State 
College graduates and other educators seeking to remain 
informed and updated on the latest in education policies and 
practices. 

Fitchburg State College Extended 
Campus Center 

The Extended Campus Center provides quality educational 
opportunities to constituents seeking professional 
development and/or formal study in academic degree 
programs offered through Fitchburg State College. Working 
within the Office of Dean of Education, and collaboratively 
with faculty, school administrators, industry leaders, and 
various educational enterprises, Extended Campus Programs 
coordinate the delivery of undergraduate and graduate 
courses at off-campus locations. 

Currently, Extended Campus Programs has well established 
collaborative relationships providing degree, certificate and 
professional development programs with the Merrimack 
Education Center in Chelmsford, the Jon Jenmarc Agency in 
Brockton, Project ERR in Middleboro, Rollins Griffith 
Teacher Center in Boston, NYPRO in Clinton, Research for 
Better Teaching in Acton and the May Center in Chatham. 
Additionally, professional development courses and 
institutes are offered through partnerships with school 
districts, museum schools, educational collaboratives and 
private entities. 

Co-Step Program 

Fitchburg State College, in collaboration with Middlesex 
Community College and the Lowell Public Schools, was 
awarded $1.25 million in funding from the U.S. Department 
of Education for a project entitled "Creating Certification 
Opportunities for Strengthening Transitional Bilingual 
Education Paraprofessionals." This program builds upon an 
existing working partnership and focuses on extending 
Middlesex Community College's certificate program and 
associate degree career ladder program for paraprofessionals 
to a baccalaureate degree and teacher licensure in 
elementary and special education (pre-k-8) licensure. 



Paraprofessional Career Ladder Program 

Fitchburg State College in collaboration with Worcester 
Public schools and Quinsigamond Community College has 
replicated the Co-Step Program Model. This initiative is 
funded through a Board of Higher Education (BHE) "No 
Child Left Behind" grant. In addition, these grant funds 
provide financial support for graduate students teaching 
under DOE waivers to pursue licensure in Special Education. 

Distance Learning Center 

The Distance Learning Center at Fitchburg State College 
provides students the opportunity to complete college 
coursework at a distance from the college. Distance 
Learning courses are offered in a variety of ways. The two 
most common means are over-the-air courses, taught with a 
connection to a Fitchburg State instructor (these may 
involve some on-campus meetings), and courses taught over 
computer network, in which the student is assigned a faculty 
mentor who communicates with the student, guides the 
student's progress and evaluates student work. Distance 
Learning courses originating from Fitchburg State are taken 
by students both within and outside the United States. 
Courses are offered on both the bachelor's and master's 
levels. Students register for these courses through Graduate 
and Continuing Education programs by calling the 
Registrar's Office. Appropriate tuition and fees apply. 

Behavioral Sciences, Human Services 
Program: Policies Governing Student 
Admission, Review, Retention and 
Dismissal, and Internship Eligibility 

Admission to the Human Services Program 

Students may enter the Human Services Program either by 
declaring it as a major upon admission to the college (as a 
freshman or an external transfer) or by transferring into 
Human Services from another major at Fitchburg State 
College (internal transfer, including readmission from 
another major at Fitchburg State College). 

Transfer into Human Services necessitates a determination 
of suitability for a career in the human services field, which 
will be assessed in an interview with one or more Human 
Services faculty, and meeting the following academic 

standards: 

• at least a 2.0 cumulative grade point average overall,- 

• a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.5 in all 
required L A & S information courses taken prior to 
applying for the transfer (i.e., General Psychology, 
Abnormal Psychology, Human Growth & Development, 
Introduction to Sociology); 

• a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.5 in all 
Human Services core courses taken prior to applying for 
the transfer (i.e., Introduction to Human Services, 
Research Methods in Human Service Practice, 
Interviewing Techniques, Group Work, Assessment & 
Intervention, Professional Issues in Human Services, 
Management of Case Process), and 

• individual grades of at least 2.5 in all of the Human 
Services skill component courses taken prior to applying 
for the transfer (i.e., Interviewing Techniques, Group 
Work, Assessment & Intervention, Management of Case 
Process). 



Review, Retention and Dismissal 

Human Services Review Committee (HSRC) 
Members of the Committee are full-time faculty who teach 
and/or advise students in the Human Services Program. The 
HSRC is responsible for implementing all student-related 
policies of the Program. 

Progress Assessment 

All students will be subject to retention review by the 
Human Services Review Committee following completion 
of each of the skill component courses. Retention will be 
based upon suitability for a career in the human services 
field, specifically: 

• a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.5 in 
required LA & S information courses (General Psychology 
Abnormal Psychology, Human Growth & Development, 
Introduction to Sociology),- 

• skills in written and oral communication, and computer 
literacy, as exhibited by a cumulative grade point average 
of at least 2.5 in appropriate courses or by demonstration, 

• a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.5 in 
required Human Services core courses (Introduction to 
Human Services, Research Methods in Human Service 
Practice, Interviewing Techniques, Group Work, 
Assessment & Intervention, Professional Issues in Human 
Services, Management of Case Process); 

• individual grades of 2.5 or higher in the four skill 
component courses (Interviewing Techniques, Group 
Work, Assessment & Intervention, Management of Case 
Process), and 

• appropriate emotional stability and interpersonal 
behavior, as demonstrated in classroom deportment and a 
minimum grade equivalent of 2.5 in evaluations of each of 
the student's field practice (practicum) experiences (150 
hours minimum). 

Students whose cumulative grade point average in Human 
Services core courses falls between 2.0 and 2.49, and whose 
grade in each skill component course is at least a 2.5, will be 
reviewed for retention in the Program, and a written 
remedial plan may be developed by the Human Services 
Review Committee in conjunction with the student. 

Students whose cumulative grade point average in Human 
Services core courses is 2.0 or less, and students who receive 
a grade of less than 2.5 in a skill component course 
(Interviewing Techniques, Group Work, Assessment & 
Intervention, or Management of Case Process) will 
automatically be reviewed, and a remedial plan will be 
developed if advisable. A student who receives less than a 
2.5 in any two of these four skill component courses would 
be deemed inappropriate for the Program and would 
typically be dismissed. In addition, students who fail to 
complete a remedial plan developed by the Committee and 
students who fail to demonstrate appropriate emotional 
stability and interpersonal behaviors will be reviewed for 
dismissal from the Program. 

If student dismissal from the Program is warranted after 
review by the Committee, the student will be informed in 
writing as to: (a) the reason for dismissal, and (b) the 
procedure for appeal. The Human Services Review 
Committee will notify the Chairperson of the Behavioral 
Sciences Department, who will then recommend to the 
Dean of Undergraduate Studies that said student not be 
retained in the Human Services Program. 



Internship Eligibility 

Successful completion of Internship is required for 
graduation from the Human Services Program. Admission to 
the major does not guarantee a student entry into 
Internship. Eligibility for Internship is based upon the 
following requirements and criteria: 

General Requirements 

• Student attends the scheduled meetings for Internship 
planning and registration, and required preparatory 
workshops on practical interviewing and resume writing 
during the semester before Internship is undertaken. 

• Student completes the Internship application process 
within the scheduled deadlines. (Failure to adhere to 
deadlines may result in a student being denied admission 
to Internship.) 

• Student has current professional liability insurance 
coverage (automatic upon enrollment in the Internship 
course). 

Students must meet the following eligibility criteria: 

• a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.5 in required LA & S 
information courses (General Psychology, Abnormal 
Psychology, Human Growth & Development, 
Introduction to Sociology), 

• skills in written and oral communication, and computer 
literacy, as exhibited by a cumulative grade point average of at 
least 2.5 in appropriate courses or by demonstration, 

• a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.5 in 
required Human Services core courses (Introduction to 
Human Services, Research Methods in Human Service 
Practice, Interviewing Techniques, Group Work, 
Assessment & Intervention, Professional Issues in Human 
Services, Management of Case Process),- 

• individual grades of 2.5 or higher in the four skill component courses 
(Interviewing Techniques, Group Work, Assessment & 
Intervention, Management of Case Process),- 

• appropriate emotional stability and interpersonal 
behavior, as demonstrated in classroom deportment and a 
minimum equivalent grade of 2.5 in evaluations of each of 
the student's field practice (practicum) experiences (150 
hours minimum),- 

• positive recommendations from a majority of Human 
Services faculty,- 

• no incomplete grades or unresolved failures in any Human 
Services core courses or electives, and no probationary 
status in the Human Services major,- 

• successful completion of the courses Group Work, 
Assessment and Intervention, and Management of Case 
Process at least one semester before undertaking 
Internship, 

• a minimum of 150 hours of supervised practice in field 
experiences (course related practica), including at least 
three different types of experience in at least two different 
placements/settings,- 

• twelve semester hours with a minimum of three faculty 
members in the Human Services Program, and 

• if a transfer student, meets the residency requirement of at 
least one full semester of course work in the Human 
Services Program following admission to the Program and 
prior to the semester in which Internship is to be 
conducted. 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Students who do not meet these specific eligibility criteria 
for Internship may request, in writing, that the Human 
Services Review Committee consider waiving the policy(ies) 
in question. Applications for waivers of criteria must be 
submitted at the same time as the application for Internship. 

Progress Review Policy: Communications 
Media Program 

• It is the responsibility of all Communications/Media 
students to meet with their advisors each semester for pre- 
registration advisement and progress review. During that 
review, the student's progress through the curriculum is 
discussed, with particular attention paid to whether or not 
the student is maintaining the 2,5 gpa or higher required 
to participate in the capstone internship experience. 

• Any student with gpa below 2.5 in the major who has 
completed the two introductory theory courses — 
Message Design, and Systems and Theories of 
Communication — and the first three required courses in 
his/her concentration will be referred to the Chair with 
the recommendation that the student be dropped from 
the Communications/Media concentration. 

• Any transfer student who has transferred 9 or more 
credits toward the major must earn a gpa of 2.5 or 
higher in the first two required courses in his/her 
Communications/Media concentration or be referred to 
the Chair with a recommendation that he/she be 
dropped from that concentration. 

• Students who are recommended to be dropped from a 
concentration may petition the Chair in writing to a) 
switch to another Communications/Media concentration 
(capacity permitting at the time of the petition),- or b) 
appeal the advisor's drop recommendation. If, with 
respect to (b), the Chair decides to uphold the advisor's 
drop recommendation, the student may appeal that 
decision to the Dean of Curriculum and Instruction. 

• Students must maintain at least a 2.5 gpa in 
Communications/Media coursework to qualify for the 
capstone internship experience. 

• The internships are described in detail in the 

Communications/Media Internship Handbook. 

Nursing 

• All students in the nursing major must achieve a grade of 
2.5 or better in the following prerequisite courses: BIOL 
1200 Anatomy and Physiology I, BIOL 1300 Anatomy 
and Physiology II, CHEM 1 100 Pre-Biochemistry I, and 
CHEM 1200 Elements of Human Biochemistry & Organic 
Chemistry to be eligible to enroll in any nursing course. 

• In addition, in order to progress to any nursing course 
(commencing with NURS 2900) with a clinical 
component, students must achieve a grade of 82 or above 
on the Accuplacer Math Readiness Exam. Students 
failing to achieve a minimum score of 82 must complete 
Basic Math I and/or Basic Math II with a grade of 2.5 or 
better. 

• During the sophomore year, students must achieve a 
grade of 2.5 or better in BIOL 2700 Survey of 
Microorganisms and BIOL 1650 Nutrition in order to 
progress to all junior nursing courses. 



• To be in good standing in the major, nursing students 
must achieve a minimum grade of 2.5 or better in each 
NURS course. In the event of one failing grade (less 
then 2.5) in one NURS course, the student: 

l.Must withdraw from all NURS courses for the following 
semester. 

2. Must enroll in NURS 4703 Critical Thinking Course and 
achieve a grade of 2.5 or better in this course. 

3. Has the option of repeating the one failed NURS course 
provided the above steps have been completed. 

Students may repeat only one nursing course 
throughout the entire program. Failure to achieve a 
grade of 2.5 or better when the course is repeated will 
result in dismissal from the major. Any subsequent 
grade of less than 2.5 in any other nursing course will 
result in dismissal from the major. 

Students will be required to take nationally normed tests 
throughout the curriculum and to make a satisfactory score 
on such tests. These tests may also count for a portion of 
course grades. In the last semester of the curriculum, 
students will be required to take a comprehensive exam and 
to make a satisfactory score on such an exam prior to 
graduation/taking the licensing exam. The student is 
responsible for testing fees associated with these exams. 

Progress Review Policy: Criminal Justice 
Program 

If a student's gpa in the CJ Core/CJ Required Liberal Arts 
and Sciences courses fall between a 2.0 and 2.49, the 
students will be reviewed for retention in the program, and 
a remedial plan developed, if advisable. The Criminal 
Justice Review Committee (CJRC) will make the decision, 
taking into account the student's gpa in the major, the 
student's overall gpa, and the student's appreciable ability 
to perform in the profession. If a remedial plan is not 
advisable, the student will be dismissed from the major 
and advised accordingly in writing as to the reasons for 
the dismissal and the procedures for appealing the 
decision. The CJRC will notify the Chair of the Behavioral 
Sciences Department, who would then notify the Dean of 
Curriculum and Instruction that the student would no 
longer be retained in the major. Students in the major may 
repeat a CJ Core/CJ Required course in which they have 
achieved a failing grade one time. Failure to achieve at 
least a 2.0 when the course is repeated results in dismissal 
from the major. Students may appeal these decisions by 
bringing the issue to the attention of (1) the Criminal 
Justice Review Committee,- (2) the Chairperson, 
Department of Behavioral Sciences, (3) the Dean of 
Curriculum and Instruction. 



Undergraduate Day Programs 




Undergraduate Day Programs 

The College has seventeen Academic Departments, each 
headed by a Department Chair. Each department has 
responsibility for one or more majors or degree programs, 
tracks within the major and minors. In the following section, 
the requirements for majors and minors are outlined under 
each discipline. Required and elective courses in each 
discipline are defined to help students with course selection. 

Academic advisors should always be consulted to ensure 
that courses are taken in the appropriate sequence and are 
fulfilling all the requirements needed for graduation. 
Students should make an appointment with the Department 
Chairperson for special information about application for 
admission into a particular major or minor. 



Departments 



Bold indicates disciplines available as a major. 



Majors/ Concentrations/Tracks Minors 



Behavioral Science 



Human Services 
Criminal Justice 
Psychology 

Developmental Psychology 
Industrial/Organizational Psychology 
Sociology 



Criminal Justice 

Industrial/Organizational Psychology 

Psychology 

Public Service Management 

Sociology 

Women's Studies 






Biology/Chemistry 



biology 

Biotechnology 
Exercise Science 
Environmental Science 
Secondary Education 



Biology 
Chemistry 



Business Administration 



Business Administration 

Accounting 

International Business and Economics 

Management 

Marketing 



Business Administration 
Public Service Management 



Communications Media 



Communications Media 
Film/Video Production 
Photography 

Professional Communication 
Graphic Design 
Interactive Media 



Graphics 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



(Continued from previous page) 

Departments Majors/Concentrations/Tracks 

Bold indicates disciplines available as a major. 



Minors 



Computer Science 



Computer Science 

Computer Information Systems 



Computer Science 



Education 



Special Education 



Early Childhood 
Elementary 
Middle School 
Special Education 

Teacher of Students with Special Needs (prek-8) 

Teacher of Students with Intensive Special Needs/Elementary (5- 



2) 



English/Speech 



English 

Literature 

Professional Writing 
Secondary Education 
Theater 



African-American Studies 

English 

Theater 

Women's Studies 



Exercise and Sport Science 


Exercise Science 




Clinical Exercise Physiology 




Fitness Management 



Geo/Physical Sciences 



Earth Science 

Earth Science/Secondary 
and Middle School Education 
Geography 



Geography/Earth Science 




Interdisciplinary Studies 



Humanities 



Interdisciplinary Studies (Humanities) 



Art 

French 

German 

Music 

Philosophy 

Spanish 



Industrial Technology 



Industrial Technology 

Architectural Technology 
Construction Technology 
Electronics Engineering 
Energy Engineering Technology 
Manufacturing Engineering 
Technical Theater Arts 
Technology Education 



Industrial Technology 
Graphics 



Leadership Academy 




Honors Program 


Leadership 


Mathematics 


Mathematics 

Secondary Education 


Mathematics 




Nursing 


Nursing 







Social Science 



Economics 

International Business and Economics 
History 

History/Secondary Education 
Political Science 



African-American Studies 

Economics 

History 

International Studies 

Peace Studies 

Political Science 

Public Service Management 

Social Science 

Women's Studies 



Majors/ Degrees/Tracks 



Biology 

BA Biology 

BS Biology 

Biology/Biotechnology 

Biology/Environmental Science 

Biology/Exercise Science 
f Biology Secondary Education Program 

Business Administration 

BS Business Administration 
Accounting 

International Business in Economics 
Management 
Marketing 

Communications Media 

BS Communications 
Graphic Design 
Film/Video Production 
Photography 

Professional Communication 
Interactive Media 

Computer Science 

BS Computer Science 

BS Computer Information Systems 

Criminal Justice 

BS Criminal Justice 

Early Childhood Education 

BS Education 

t Early Childhood Education Program 

Economics 

BS Economics 

International Business in Economics 

Elementary Education 

BS Education 

f Elementary Education Program 

English 

BA/BS English 

Literature 

Professional Writing 

Theater 
f English Secondary Education Program 

Exercise and Sport Science 

BS Exercise and Sport Science 

Geography 

BA Ceography 
Geography 
Earth Science 

BS Ceography 

Geography 

Earth Science 
f Earth Science Secondary Education Program 

History 

BA History 



BS History 

t History Secondary Education Program 

Human Services 

BS Human Services 

Industrial Technology 

BS Industrial Technology 
Architectural Technology 
Construction Technology 
Electronics Engineering 
Energy Engineering Technology 
Manufacturing Engineering 
Technical Theater Arts 

Interdisciplinary Studies 

BA Interdisciplinary Studies 
BS Interdisciplinary Studies 

Mathematics 

BA Mathematics 
BS Mathematics 
f Mathematics Secondary Education Program 

Nursing 

BS Nursing 

Political Science 

BA Political Science 
BS Political Science 

Psychology 

BA Psychology 
BS Psychology 

Sociology 

BA Sociology 
BS Sociology 

Middle School Education 

BS Education 

f Middle School Education Program 

Special Education 

BS Education 

t Special Education Program 

Teacher of Students with Special Needs (pre-K-8)/ 
Elementary Teacher 

Teacher of Students with Special Needs (5-12)/ 
Elementary Teacher 

Teacher of Students with Intensive Special Needs 
(all levels)/Elementary Teacher 

Technology Education 

Technology Secondary Education Program 

f A liberal arts and sciences major is required jor these Teacher Preparation 
programs. 

*No applications Jor the CLS program are being accepted. 



COLLEGE CATALOG 






African-American Studies 

Chairpersons 

Michael Turk 
Janice Albergbene 

Objectives for the African-American Studies 
Program 

The interdisciplinary program in African American Studies 
provides courses which examine the cultures, history, and 
literature of African-American peoples. This course work 
provides students with new perspectives on the significant 
roles played by these peoples. 

Requirements for the Minor in African- 
American Studies 

This interdisciplinary program requires a minimum of 18 
credits. Students may use no more than two of their major 
courses toward the minor. 

Required Courses 

AAST 1000 Introduction to African-American Studies 

Select One: 

2300 African American History 

2930 Modern African History 

2520 African American Women's History 



AAST/HIST 

AAST/HIST 

AAST/HIST 

Select One: 

AAST/ENG 

AAST/ENG 



2670 2orfe Century African American Literature 
2650 Other Voices 

Electives (select 3) 

AAST/HIST 2300 African American History 

AAST/HIST 2930 Modem African History 

AAST/HIST 2520 African American Women's History 

AAST/ENG 2650 Other Voices 

AAST/ENG 2660 l 9th Century African American Literature 

AAST/ENG 2670 20th Century African American Literature 

AAST/SOC 2510 Peoples and Cultures of Africa 

AAST/MUSC 3800 History of Jazz 

AAST/PHED 1310 African Jazz Dance 

Independent Study, Directed Study, or Topics courses that 

are pertinent to the minor can be selected in consultation 

with the coordinators of the African-American Studies 

Minor. 



Art 



Chairperson 

James Colbert 

Professors 

Donna Bechis 
Susan Wadsworth 



Assistant Professor 

Petri Flint 



Objectives for the Program in Art 

The art program provides undergraduates with a variety of 
studio and art history courses to increase their aesthetic 
awareness and skills. 

Requirements for the Minor in Art 

The minor in art requires a minimum of 1 8 semester hours, 
including the following: 

Required Studio Course: 

Select One: 

ART 1 300 Intro to Studio Art 
ART 1400 Drawing 



ART 1450 Introduction to Painting 

ART 1600 Design 

ART 1840 Sculpture I or any other studio art course 

Required Art History Courses 

Select one: 

Art Appreciation 

Nineteenth Century Art 

History of Architecture 

Women, Art and Society or any other art history 

course 

The remaining 1 1 semester hours may be taken from 
approved art electives. At least two courses must at or above 
the 2000 level.* 



MUSC 2000 Commonwealth of the Arts or MUSC 2 100 
Commonwealth of the Ancient Arts can he used as one of the four 
electives. 



ART 


1100 


ART 


2900 


ART 


3 300 


ART 


3700 



Biology 



Chairperson 

George Babich 

Professors 

George Babich 
Dorothy Boisvert 
Howard Thomas 



Associate Professors Assistant Professors 

Margaret Hoey Christopher Cratsley 

Michael Nosek 
Natalie Stassen 



Objectives for the Program in Biology 

The Biology Department offers an educational program that 
is sound and challenging. The program has a vibrant, 
dedicated faculty with a broad range of expertise in the 
biological sciences. The faculty serve as teacher/mentor/ 
scholar. This provides a positive role model for Biology 
majors. The Department has a rich history of producing 
successful graduates in teacher training, biotechnology, and 
environmental science. The Department provides a 
supportive teaching/learning environment giving individual 
attention to students and research opportunities. Student 
training includes a strong foundation in bioethics which is 
fostered within in the curriculum. Students become aware of 
career potentials by close association with their academic 
advisors. Entering Biology freshmen are invited to special 
orientation, learning about program expectations and 
opportunities in the field of biology. The Biology club 
provides an interface between students and the Department 
which allows for personal and social interactions. The 
department also offers courses in laboratory science for 
students in all other majors. 

Requirements for the Major in Biology 

All students in either the Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of 
Arts programs in Biology (exceptions listed below) are 
offered a required core sequence of courses. These core 
biology courses all involve student laboratory work to 
develop the skills of scientific inquiry. Students are 
introduced to computer applications for biological research 
in General Biology I and II, as part of their Computer 
Literacy requirement. These skills are utilized and expanded 
upon in their upper level biology courses. Students also 
develop scientific literacy through reading, writing, and 
talking about scientific concepts in these courses. In 
Developmental biology, the capstone course of the Biology 
core, students demonstrate their mastery of these skills as 
part of their Listening and Speaking and Jr./Sr. Senior 
Writing requirements. 




m 



BIOL 


1800 


BIOL 


1900 


BIOL 


2300 


BIOL 


2800 


BIOL 


3250 


BIOL 


3550 



CHEM 


4 400 


CHEM 


2000 


CHEM 


2100 


PHYS 


2300 


PHYS 


2400 



General Biology I 

General Biology II 

Ecology 

Genetics 

Cell Biology 

Developmental Biology 
In addition, 1 2 semester hours of additional biology 
electives at or above the 2000 level are required of biology 
majors. Electives may be chosen in an area of specialization 
in consultation with a faculty advisor. 

Finally, BA and BS students are required to take courses in 
related sciences and two courses in mathematics at or above 
the level of MATH 1250. BA students are required to have 
foreign language proficiency at the Intermediate level. 

Required Courses in Related Sciences 

CHEM 1300 General Chemistry I 

General Chemistry II 

Organic Chemistry I 

Organic Chemistry II 

General Physics I 

General Physics II 
Exceptions: The requirements are slightly modified for the BS in Biology/ 
Environmental Science and the BS in Biology/Exercise Science programs. 

BS in Biology/ Biotechnology 

The Bachelor of Science in Biology/Biotechnology includes 
all of the core requirements for the BS in Biology. In 
addition, the 12 semester hours of Biology electives are 
replaced by Biochemistry, General Microbiology and 
Molecular Biology. 

BS in Biology with Initial Teacher Licensure 

Students within our Biology major can pursue initial 
licensure as high school Biology teachers. This program 
provides students with both a broad introduction to high 
school teaching and specific instruction in the theory, 
research and practice of secondary science teaching. 
Students engage in field-based experiences in the school 
setting supervised by our faculty through on-site pre- 
practicum experiences coupled with each teaching course 
and a formal teaching practicum as the capstone experience. 
This program is nationally accredited by NCATE and boasts 
graduates working in high schools throughout the region. 

Students interested in pursuing Initial Teacher Licensure 
must apply for formal admission to the program. For 
information about undergraduate requirements in teacher 
preparation, see the section titled: "Teacher Preparation 
Programs (Undergraduate)." In addition to the required 
courses for the major, students in the program must take a 
core sequence of teacher preparation courses. 

Core Requirements 

BIOL 2860 Introduction to Secondary School Teaching 

Secondary Programs for Adolescents (14-22) with 

Special Needs 

Teaching Writing in Middle and 

Secondary Schools 

Biology Teaching Methods 

Biology Practicum in a Secondary School 

(300 hrs.) 



SPED 


3800 


ENGL 


4700 


BIOL 


4850 


BIOL 


4 860/ 




4870 



Post Baccalaureate Program in Biology, 8- 
12 

Students who hold a bachelor's degree and wish to 
become a secondary level (grades 8- 1 2) teacher of Biology, 
may complete a post baccalaureate program that consists of 
the equivalent of a degree in biology and 18 credit hours of 
pedagogical coursework in education. 

Students who are interested in the program must meet the 
following criteria: 

• Evidence of a bachelor's degree 

• A gpa of 2.8 or better 

• Successful completion of the Massachusetts Test for 
Educator Licensure: Communication and Literacy Skills 
Sub-test 

Once accepted, students will undergo a transcript review by 
the Graduate Program Chair or undergraduate advisor, as 
designated by the department and a plan of study will be 
developed that address: 

• Courses missing (if applicable) in the subject that are 
equivalent to the requirements for the major will be 
determined through a transcript review. Students will 
complete all requirements of the major and license as 
identified in the undergraduate program. 

• Courses as identified below in the teacher preparation 
program (pedagogy courses): 

When courses are in a student's plan of study, he/she will 
complete the plan of study at the undergraduate level, or at 
the graduate level if the equivalent is offered. 

Once the licensure program is completed, students can 
request admission to the graduate program after completing 
additional admissions requirements as designated by the 
department. 

Required Education Courses 

BIOL 2860 Introduction to Secondary Teaching 

Teaching Writing in Middle and Secondary Schools 
Adolescents with Special Needs 
Special Methods in Teaching Biology 
Practicum I(i5oHrs.) 
Practicum II (l 50 Hrs.) 
Once a student has completed all requirements for 
professional and content specific courses, they will be 
eligible for endorsement in their selected field through 
Fitchburg State College. 



ENGL 


4700 


SPED 


3800 


BIOL 


4850 


BIOL 


4860 


BIOL 


4870 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



*BIOL 


1900 


CHEM 


1300 


CHEM 


1400 


PHYS 


2300 


PHYS 


2400 


*BIOL 


2300 


*BIOL 


2800 


*BIOL 


3250 


*BIOL 


3550 


ENSC 


1000 


ENSC 


2000 


ENSC 


2100 


GEOG 


2100 


ENSC 


3000 


GEOG 


4 600 


ENSC 


4100 


ENSC 


4950 



BS in Biology/Environmental Science 

The Bachelor of Science in Biology/Environmental Science 
includes all of the requirements of the BS in Biology with 
the exception that Organic Chemistry I and I! are replaced 
by Elements of Physical Chemistry (ENSC 3000) and 
Environmental Analysis (ENSC 4000) and the required four 
biology electives are replaced by Field Techniques in 
Environmental Science I and II (ENSC 2000 and 2001) and 
Internship (ENSC 4950). 

Requirements for the BS in Biology/ 
Environmental Science 

*BIOL isoo General Biology I 

General Biology II 

General Chemistry I 

General Chemistry II 

General Physics I 

General Physics II 

Ecology 

Genetics 

Cell Biology 

Developmental Biology 

Introduction to Environmental Science 

Field Techniques in Environmental Science I 

Field Techniques in Environmental Science II 

Geology 

Elements oj Physical Chemistry 

Environmental Hydrology 

Seminar in Environmental Science 

Internship in Environmental Science 
*These core biology courses all involve student laboratory work to develop 
the skills of scientijic inquiry. Students are introduced to computer 
applications jor biological research in General Biology I and II, as part oj 
their Computer Literacy requirement. These skills are utilized and expanded 
upon in their upper level biology courses. Students also develop scientijic 
literacy through reading, writing, and talking about scientijic concepts in 
these courses. In Developmental biology, the capstone course oj the biology 
core, students demonstrate their master oj these skill as part of their Listening 
and Speaking and Jr.lSr. Writing requirements. 

BS in Biology/Exercise Science 

The Biology Bachelor degree in Exercise Science is different 
than the Exercise and Sport Science degree offered by the 
Exercise and sport science department. The BS. exercise 
science in biology shares common course requirements with 
the BS degree except for the substitution of Anatomy and 
Physiology I & II for General Biology. Students are prepared 
for employment in the fitness industry, including the 
corporate, hospital or commercial setting. Many students go 
on to graduate programs in either Biology or exercise related 
disciplines, eg. Physical Therapy. This major provides a 
strong foundation in the biological sciences which then 
supports a multifaceted series of courses such as exercise 
physiology, adaptations, nutrition and heart disease offered 
by the Exercise and Sport Science Department. 
BIOL isoo General Biology I 

Anatomy and Physiology I 

Anatomy and Physiology II 

Nutrition 

Genetics 

Cell Biology 

Biochemistry 

Developmental Biology 

Motor Learning 

Exercise Physiology 



BIOL 


1200 


BIOL 


1300 


BIOL 


1650 


BIOL 


2800 


BIOL 


3250 


BIOL 


3450 


BIOL 


3550 


EXSS 


2040 


EXSS 


2070 



EXSS 3020 Biomechanics 

*BIOL 4950 Internship or 

EXSS 4950 Internship or 

EXSS 3 450 Exercise Testing and Programming 

* A 2.5 cumulative gpa is required jor the internship. 

Requirements for the Minor in Biology 

The minor in Biology enables students to demonstrate a 
substantial and coordinated subsidiary expertise in 
biological sciences. The minor in Biology requires a 
minimum of 1 8 semester hours of course work as follows: 

One year (6 or 8 semester hours) of any of the entry-level 

Biology sequences: 

BIOL iooo Lije Science I and 

Ltje Science II or 

Anatomy and Physiology I and 

Anatomy and Physiology II or 

General Biology I and 

General Biology II 

Ten semester hours oj 2000, 3000, 4000-/et;e/ 

courses selected ajter consultation with a minors 

advisor in the Biology Department. 



Business Administration 

Chairperson 

Joseph McAloon 

Professors Associate Professors Assistant Professors 

James Noonan 
Louis Zivic 



BIOL 


1100 


BIOL 


1200 


BIOL 


1300 


BIOL 


1800 


BIOL 


1900 



Diane Caggiano 
Sylvia Charland 
Joseph McAloon 
Harold Scbonbeck 
Charles Wellens 



Francis Morrison 
Gary Vostok 
Kwahng Kim 



Objectives for the Program in Business 
Administration 

The Business Administration Department prepares each 
student to take a responsible position within the world of 
business equipped with a knowledge of business theories, 
policies, and procedures. 

The curriculum is based in the liberal arts, coupled with 
professional courses and a variety of practical business 
experiences including the opportunity for experiential 
learning through internships, structured to give the 
participant an opportunity to apply the theory of the 
classroom to a specific work experience. 

Business and Economic Research Institute 

Students and faculty research the latest economic data and 
banking rates for the region and publish these results. 



Accreditation Standards 

Accredited by the International Assembly for Collegiate 
Business Education (IACBE), Member of American Assembly 
of Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB), Member of 
Association of Collegiate Business Schools and Programs. 
(ACBSP) 

Requirements for the Major in Business 
Administration 

Concentrations/Options 

The Business Administration Program at Fitchburg State 
College includes concentrations in one of five areas of 
business: accounting, management, marketing, fitness 
management, or CIS (Computer Information Systems). 

Core Curriculum 

BSAD 2010 Introduction to Financial Reporting 

Introduction to Managerial Accounting 

Principles oj Management 

Fundamentals of Marketing 

Basic Finance 

Business Law I 

Business Policy and Strategy* 

id Sciences Requirements 

Speech 

Macroeconomics 

Microeconomics 

Introduction to Computer Information Systems 

for Business 

Business Statistics 

Calculus for Business 
The courses beyond the core curriculum are open only to 
Business Administration majors. These upper-level courses 
are not transferable from another college if they are required 
within a student's concentration. 

* Jr./Sr. Writing Requirement 

Specializations for the Major in Business 
Administration 

Accounting Curriculum 

BSAD 3010 Financial Reporting Theory and Practice I 

BSAD 3020 Financial Reporting Theory and Practice II 

BSAD 3)20 Cost Accounting 

BSAD 4010 Financial Reporting Theory and Practice III 

BSAD 4 no International Accounting and Taxation 

BSAD 4120 Individual Taxation 

BSAD 4140 Auditing 

BSAD 4 500 Business Law II 

One Directed Advanced Elective from the following: 

BSAD 4ioo Consolidations and Mergers or 

BSAD 4 130 Corporate, Estate, and Gift Taxation or 

BSAD 4 160 Not-for-Profit Accounting 

Management Curriculum 

BSAD 3210 Human Resources Management 

BSAD 3220 Production Management 

BSAD 4200 Organizational Behavior and Theory 

BSAD 4210 Social and Political Environment of Business 

BSAD 4230 Business Fluctuations and Forecasting 



BSAD 


2020 


BSAD 


3200 


BSAD 


3 300 


BSAD 


3 400 


BSAD 


3 500 


BSAD 


4890 


Liberal Arts « 


SPCH 


1000 


ECON 


1100 


ECON 


1200 


BSAD 


1700 


MATH 


1800 


MATH 


2200 



BSAD 


3350 


BSAD 


4 300 


BSAD 


4310 


BSAD 


4320 


BSAD 


4330 


BSAD 


4340 



BSAD 4880 International Business Management 

Marketing Curriculum 

BSAD 3 3 10 Consumer Behavior 

BSAD 3 320 Market Research 

BSAD 3 3 30 Advertising 

BSAD 4880 International Business Management 

In addition, three marketing electives (from list below) 

are also required: 

BSAD 3340 Small Business Management 

Total Quality Management 

Sales Management 

Retail Marketing 

Industrial Marketing 

International Marketing 

Developing Marketing Strategies 

Business Administration/International 
Business and Economics 

The International Business and Economics program provides 
students with an understanding of the rapidly changing 
global economy. It concentrates on explanations of the 
complexities of the business discipline in relationship to the 
theory of international trade and finance and the changing 
roles of international institutions (such as the World Trade 
Organization and the International Monetary Fund). The 
concentration provides the student with knowledge of the 
intricacies of doing business internationally. Students will 
study international marketing and the commerce, trade and 
investments of international business. 

LAS Requirements 

BSAD 1700 Introduction to Computer Information Systems 
for Business 
Business Statistics 
Calculus for Business 
Principles of Macroeconomics 
Principles of Microeconomics 
Introduction to International Studies or 
Global Issues 
World Civilizations III 
Speech 

World Literature I or 
World Literature II 
World Novel I or 
World Novel II 

Major Requirements in Business 
Administration and Economics 

BSAD 2010 Introduction to Financial Reporting 

Introduction to Managerial Accounting 

Principles of Management 

Human Resource Management 

Fundamentals of Marketing 

Basic Finance 

International Marketing 

International Business Management 

Business Policy and Strategy 

International Economics 

International Finance Economics 
And either 1 courses from the following list of 
Macroeconomic courses: 
ECON 2200 Comparative Economic Systems 
ECON 2 400 Money and Banking 
ECON 2 500 Economic Development 
ECON 3650 Intermediate Macroeconomics Theory 



MATH 


1800 


MATH 


2200 


ECON 


1100 


ECON 


1200 


IDIS 


1200 


IDIS 


1800 


HIST 


1150 


SPCH 


1000 


ENGL 


2 400 


ENGL 


2500 


ENGL 


3 100 


ENGL 


31 10 



BSAD 


2020 


BSAD 


3200 


BSAD 


3210 


BSAD 


3300 


BSAD 


3400 


BSAD 


4330 


BSAD 


4880 


BSAD 


4890 


ECON 


3550 


ECON 


3600 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Or 1 courses from the following list of 
Microeconomics courses: 

ECON 2300 Industrial Organization 
ECON 2400 Money and Banking 
ECON 3660 Intermediate Microeconomics Theory 
ECON 3750 Managerial Economics 

Requirements for the Minor in 
Business Administration 

The minor in Business Administration consists of 18 credits. 

The following four courses are required: 

BSAD 2010 Introduction to Financial Reporting 

BSAD 3200 Principles oj Management 

BSAD 3 300 Fundamentals oj Marketing 

BSAD 3 500 Business Law I 

Two business electives must also be taken. Two of the six 

required courses may be transferred from another college. 

Students minoring in Business Administration may take a 

maximum of two upper-level courses. These courses must be 

taken at Fitchburg State College and they must be approved 

by the Department Chairperson. 



Chemistry 



Chairperson 

George Babich 

Professors 

Judith Ciottone 
Meledath Govindan 
Da-hong Lu 
Daniel V. Robinson 

Objectives for the Program in Chemistry 

The Chemistry Program provides coursework for majors in 
Nursing, Biology, Industrial Technology, Clinical 
Laboratory Sciences, Environmental Science and Earth 
Science. A minor in Chemistry also is available to all 
students. 

Requirements for the Minor in Chemistry 

A Minor in Chemistry consists of: 

CHEM 1300 General Chemistry I 

CHEM i400 General Chemistry II 

CHEM 2000 Organic Chemistry I 

CHEM 2100 Organic Chemistry II 

CHEM 3000 Analytical Chemistry I 

One course selected from Analytical Chemistry II, Physical 

Chemistry I, Physical Chemistry II, Advanced Inorganic 

Chemistry, Radiation Chemistry, Forensic Chemistry, or 

Natural Products. 



Communications Media 



Chairperson 

George Bohrer 

Professors 

George Bohrer 
Peter Laytin 
Wayne Munson 
Helen Obermeyer 

Simmons 
Charles Sides 



Associate Professor Assistant Professors 



Randy Howe 
Jon Krasner 
Ann Mrvica 
Jeffrey Warmouth 



Robert Can 
John Chetro-Sz'wos 
Stephen Goldstein 
Robert Harris 
Guntber Hoos 
Charles Roberts 
Marisol Torres 



Objectives for the Program in 
Communications Media 

The Communications Media Program prepares individuals 
to assume communication positions as freelancers, 
independent producers, or employees of corporations, 
institutions, and media organizations. 

The program provides a blend of the principles and 
practices necessary for the effective design, production, and 
evaluation of media for information presentation by graphic, 
photographic, film, video, electronic, and print 
technologies. In combination with the Liberal Arts and 
Sciences Program, Communications Media fosters the 
development of skills critical to adapting to an ever 
changing technological and knowledge-based society. 

Requirements for the Major in 
Communications Media 

The Bachelor of Science degree in Communications Media 
requires 54 semester hours in its major requirements. Course 
requirements are organized into five phases. 

LAS Requirements 

PHIL aoo Introduction to Philosophy or 
PHIL 2 550 Contemporary Ethical Systems or 
PHIL 2600 Philosophy of Human Nature 
SOC 1000 Introduction to Sociology 
PSY iioo General Psychology 

Phase I Freshman Introductory 
Requirements 

Phase I exposes students to the foundations, concepts, and 
practices used in the preparation, delivery, evaluation, and 
research of verbal and visual messages. 

Required Courses 

COMM 1105 Systems and Theories of Communication 
COMM 1120 Message Design 

Phase II Applied Concentration 

Phase II enables students to become involved with an in- 
depth investigation of an area in communications which is 
most closely aligned with individual talents and interests. 
Students must select and complete one concentration with 
the consent of their advisor. A minimum of five required 
courses must be taken within a concentration. 

Note: For some concentration courses, students are expected 
to pay for supplies that may range in cost from $100 to 
$300 per course. 




COMM 3510 

COMM 3 5 30 
COMM 3 550 
COMM 3 560 
COMM 3 5 80 
COMM 3 720 
COMM 3 730 
COMM 3740 
COMM 3 750 



Film Production Concentration 

Required Courses 

COMM 3 505 Introduction to Film and Video 

COMM 3 506 Pre-Production Planning jor Film and Video 

COMM 3 7io Intermediate Film Production 

Chose one Specialized Elective from the following: 

COMM 2320 Script Writing 

Audio Production for Film and Video 

Post-Production 

Production Management 

Sound Design 

Studio Lighting and Production 

Advanced Film Production 

Directing for Film and Video 

Digital Production for Film and Video 

Cinematography 

Video Production Concentration 

Required Courses 

COMM 3 505 Introduction to Film and Video 

COMM 3 506 Pre-Production Planning for Film and Video 

COMM 37io Intermediate Film Production 

Chose one Specialized Elective from the following: 

COMM 2320 Script Writing 

COMM 3 510 Audio Production for Film and Video 

Post-Production 

Advanced Video Production 

Production Management 

Sound Design 

Studio Lighting and Production 

Directing for Film and Video 

Digital Production for Film and Video 

Cinematography 



COMM 3530 
COMM 3 540 
COMM 3 550 

COMM 
COMM 
COMM 
COMM 
COMM 



3560 
3580 
3730 
3740 
3 750 



Elective Courses 

COMM 2320 Script Writing 

COMM 3 530 Post-Production 

COMM 3550 Production Management 

COMM 3560 Sound Design 

COMM 3 730 Directing Video/Film 

COMM 3 750 Cinematography 

Graphic Design Concentration 

Required Courses 

COMM 38io Graphic Design I 

COMM 3 820 Graphic Design II 

COMM 3 880 Typography 

COMM 3 890 Computer Graphic Design 

One of the following electives: 

Elective Courses 

COMM 3830 Graphic Design III 

COMM 3840 Graphic Management 

COMM 3 850 Publication Design 

COMM 3900 Graphic Design Photography 

COMM 3910 Graphic Arts Production 

COMM 3920 Advanced Computer Graphic Design 

COMM 4 2 70 Pre-Press Production 

Photography Concentration 

Required Courses 

COMM 3 600 Photography I 
COMM 36 10 Photography II 
COMM 3620 Photography III 
COMM 3630 Large Format Photography 
COMM 3645 Digital Photography 



Elective Courses 

COMM 3640 Color Photography 
COMM 3 660 Photo Management 
COMM 3690 Photography Seminar 

Professional Communication Concentration 

Required Courses 

COMM 3 304 Multimedia Project Design 
COMM 3 430 Writing for Advertising 
COMM 3 460 Public Relations 
COMM 3 470 Technical Documentation 
COMM 3860 Writing for Business and Technology 

Elective Courses 

COMM 2 320 Scn>f Writing 

COMM 2800 Journalism 

COMM 3 870 Feature and Magazine Writing 

Note: It is recommended that students take the history course related to their 

concentration as part of their Liberal Arts and Sciences program. These 

courses include History of Film I, History of Film II, History of TV, 

History of Graphic Design, and History of Photography. 

Interactive Media Concentration 

Required Courses 

COMM 3 304 Interactive Project Design 
COMM 3 305 Interactive Media I 
COMM 3 306 Interactive Media II 
COMM 3 307 Interactive Media III 
COMM 3 309 Interface Design 

Communications Studies Concentration 

This concentration provides for advanced studies of the 
theoretical constructs necessary for strategic analysis, 
design, application, research, and evaluation of a variety of 
media systems. It provides foundational preparation for 
graduate studies in communications and a number of allied 
fields. 

Requirements: Phase I and II, plus the following courses 
from Phases III and IV: COMM 4205, COMM 4230, 
COMM 4240, COMM 4250, one to two electives , and 
Phase V. 

Phase Hi Advanced Electives 

Following or concurrent with Phase II, students, in 
consultation with their advisor, select one of the following 
options: 

• Four additional courses in the same concentration 

• Four courses in other concentrations 

• Four courses from a combination of concentrations, 
including additional theory, conceptual, or 
methodological courses 

• Courses from the multimedia module: 

COMM 3 304 Multimedia Project Design 

Multimedia Tools and Techniques 

Interactive Media 

Multimedia Production 

Multimedia Seminar 
COMM 3890 Computer Graphic Design 



COMM 3305 
COMM 3 306 

COMM 
COMM 



3307 
3 308 






COLLEGE CATALOG 



phase iv upper-uvei Theory/conceptual/ Computer Information Systems 



Methodological Requirements 

Students in their junior/senior year will take the following 

Media Workplace Dynamics 

Requirement 

COMM 4200 Human Communications 

Junior Writing Requirement (Select One) 

COMM 2 800 Journalism 

COMM 3 4 30 Writing jor Advertising 

COMM 3 4 60 Public Relations 

COMM 3 470 Technical Documentation 

COMM 3 8 60 Writing jor Business and Technology 

COMM 4 2 40 Media Criticism 

Electives (Select One) 



COMM 4210 


Instructional Training Design 


COMM 4220 


Organizational Communication 


COMM 4230 


Communications Law and Ethics 


COMM 4240 


Media Criticism 




(unless used jor junior writing requirement) 


COMM 4250 


Research Seminar 


COMM 4205 


Seminar in Communication Theory 



Phase V Integrated Studies 

This required senior level phase provides an opportunity for 
students to apply their knowledge and skills in a 
professional environment. 

Required Course 

COMM 4880 Internship (i 2 cr.) 

Enrichment Courses (electives) 

COMM 4260 Advanced Professional Study 

COMM 490 i Independent Study (i cr.) 

COMM 4902 Independent Study (2 cr.) 

COMM 4903 Independent Study (3 cr.) 

COMM 4906 Independent Study (6 cr.) 

COMM 4940 Field Study (3 cr.) 

COMM 4950 Field Study 6 cr.) 

VISIONS 

VISIONS is an annual juried exhibition of the best work by 
Communications Media students during that year. VISIONS 
is held in late April of each year. 

Requirements for the Minor in Graphics 

An interdisciplinary minor in graphics is offered in 
conjunction with the Computer Science and Industrial 
Technology Departments. See Graphics in this catalog for 
an explanation of program requirements. 



Chairperson 

Frits Lander 

Program Objectives 

The Computer Information Systems program offers the 
opportunity for students to develop knowledge and skills in 
analysis and design of business information systems, 
database development, software development, and 
networking. This program prepares the students for 
professional careers in the rapidly changing field of 
computer information systems. Students develop good 
communication skills and the ability for teamwork and 
leadership roles in their professional careers. 

All CIS majors are encouraged to seek a minor in Business 
Administration. 

Requirements for the major in Computer 
Information Systems must include: 



CSC 


1000 


Introduction to Programming 


CSC 


1400 


Computer Information Systems 


CSC/ 






MATH 


1900 


Discrete Mathematics 


CSC 


1500 


Computer Science I 


CSC 


1550 


Computer Science II 


CSC 


2400 


Database Systems 


CSC 


2560 


Systems Programming 


CSC 


2 700 


Business Programming 


CSC 


3400 


Data Communications and Networking 


CSC 


3450 


Local Area Networks 


BSAD 


2010 


Introduction to Financial Reporting 


BSAD 


2020 


Introduction to Managerial Accounting 


BSAD 


3200 


Principles of Management 


BSAD 


3300 


Fundamentals of Marketing 


BSAD 


3400 


Basic Finance 


CSC/ 






BSAD 


3710 


Systems Analysis Methods 


CSC/ 






*BSAD 


4700 


Systems Design & Implementation 


ECON 


1100 


Macroeconomics 


ECON 


1200 


Microeconomics 


*MATH 


1250 


Introduction to Functions 


MATH 


1800 


Business Statistics 


MATH 


2200 


Calculus for Business 


Three additional CS electives at or above 3000 level 




* Pending placement exam results. 

* Course used to satisfy Junior/Senior Writing, and Speaking and Listening 

requirements. Computer Literacy requirement is satisfied by CS core. 



Computer Science 



Criminal Justice 



Chairperson 

Frits Lander 

Professor 

Nadimpalli Mabadev 



Instructor 

Lori Leonard 



Associate Professors Assistant Professors 

Frank Archambeault Brady Chen 



Frits Lander 



Natasha Kourtonina 
Kevin Austin 

Stephen Taylor 



Objectives for the Program in Computer 
Science 

The Computer Science Program offers the opportunity for 
students to develop a unique blend of knowledge and skills 
in the areas of computer software and computer hardware. 
The program provides sufficient theoretical background for 
continued learning. It also provides practical skills to 
prepare the students for professional careers in the rapidly 
changing field of computer science. Students develop good 
communication skills and the ability for teamwork and 
leadership roles in their professional careers. 

Requirements for the Major in Computer 
Science 



The Degree o 


Bachelor of Science in Com| 


must include: 




CSC 


1500 


Computer Science I 


CSC 


1550 


Computer Science II 


CSC 


1600 


Introduction to Electronics 


CSC 


1650 


Digital Electronics 


CSC/ 

\A ATIA 


1900 


Discrete Mathematics 


lvu\l n 

CSC 


2560 


Systems Programming 


CSC 


2600 


Computer Organization 


CSC 


3100 


Operating Systems 


CSC 


3200 


Programming Languages 


CSC 


3600 


Microprocessors 


CSC 


3 700 


Algorithms and Data Structures 


*csc 


4 400 


Software Engineering 


+MATH 1 300 


Pre-Calculus 


MATH 


1800 


Business Statistics 


MATH 


2300 


Calculus I 


MATH 


2400 


Calculus II 


MATH 


2600 


Linear Algebra 


PHYS 


2300 


General Physics I 


PHYS 


2400 


General Physics II 


Five CS 


dectives 


at or above 3000 level. 



+ Pending placement exam results 

* Course used to satisfy Junior/Senior Writing, and Speaking and Listening 
requirements. Computer Literacy requirement is satisfied by CS core. 

Requirements for the Minor 
in Computer Science 

A minor in Computer Science consists of the following 
courses: 



CSC 


1500 


Computer Science I 


CSC 


1550 


Computer Science II 


CSC 


2560 


Systems Programming 


CSC 


3 200 


Programming Languages 

2 Computer Science electives at or above the 

3000 level 



Chairperson Coordinator 

Margot Kempers Richard Wiebe 

Associate Prof essor Assistant Professors 

Richard Wiebe Fatal Ahmed 

Randall Grometstein 

Objectives for the Major in Criminal Justice 

The Criminal Justice Major provides students with courses 
which lead to a Bachelor of Science Degree provides a 
foundation for employment in the Criminal Justice field and 
graduate work. 

Requirements for the LAS 
Criminal Justice Major 

As part of their Liberal Arts and Sciences requirements, all 
students in the Criminal Justice Major must complete: 
POLS iooo United State Government 

General Psychology 

Abnormal Psychology 

Applied Statistics 

Introduction to Sociology 

Criminal Justice Research Methods 



Introduction to Criminal Justice* 

Principles and Practice of 

Law Enforcement 

Correctional Theory and Practice 

Ethics in Criminal Justice 

Introduction to Legal Process 

Criminology 

Criminal Justice Data Analysis 

Colloquium (3 cr.) and additional 3 crs. Criminal 
Justice course*** or 
Internship (6 or 12 credits)**** 



Elective Courses (18 credits) 

In conjunction with the Criminal Justice Core, each student 
will select 1 8 hours of criminal justice electives to complete 
the 45 semester hours required in the Criminal Justice 
Major. From the list below, each student, in consultation 
with his/her advisor, should select a minimum of six courses. 



PSY 


1100 


PSY 


2350 


MATH 


1700 


soc 


1100 


CJ 


3130 


Core 


Requ 


CJ 


2000 


CJ 


2050 


CJ 


2650 


CJ 


2651 


POLS 


2270 


SOC 


2750 


CJ 


3140 


Capstone 


CJ 


3 750 


CJ 


4970/ 




4990 



Criminal Justice 


CJ 


2100 


Introduction to Courts 


CJ 


2450 


Women in Criminal Justice 


CJ 


2500 


Correctional Law 


CJ 


2550 


Criminal Law 


CJ 


2560 


Race, Crime and the Law 


CJ 


2600 


Juvenile Justice 


CJ 


3000 


Domestic Terrorism and Hate Crime 


CJ 


3050 


International Terrorism 


CJ 


3100 


Organized Crime and Youth Gangs 


CJ 


3200 


White Collar and Corporate Crime 


CJ 


3525 


Comparative Justice Systems 


Human Services 


HMSV 


2400 


Crisis Intervention 


HMSV 


3 500 


Child Abuse and Neglect 


Political Science 


POLS 


2550 


Sex, Race, and the Constitution 


POLS 


2 700 


Criminal Procedure: The Rights of the Accused 


POLS 


3500 


Constitutional Law 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Sociology 

SOC 2 760 Juvenile Delinquency 

SOC 3500 Law and Society 

Selected topics courses in these disciplines may be allowable with the 

permission oj your advisor. CJ electives from other colleges may be accepted 

as electives ij approved by the CJ Advisory Committee. 

* This course is a prerequisite to all classes. 

***These courses require prior faculty approval. Students must pre-register 
with faculty members prior to registration. 

****Students have the option of selecting an Internship of 6 or 12 credits 
over one or two semesters. If a student chooses a n-hour internship, 6 of 
those credit hours will count as free electives. All Internships shall he 
conducted in accordance with existing policies in the Department of 
Behavioral Sciences. While all Internships require approval of the CJRC, 
students seeking direct service Internships may have further 
prerequisites depending on the nature of the field placement (Field settings 
often have a preference for/require specific coursework. Students need to see 
their advisors for details and refer to the Field Placement Office for 
policies pertaining to field placements.) 

Free Electives (to bring to a total of 120 
credits for graduation) 

It is the student's responsibility to fulfill accurately and 
completely all Liberal Arts and Sciences and departmental 
requirements for the degree. 

Requirements for the Minor 
in Criminal Justice 

An interdisciplinary minor in Criminal Justice is offered by 
the Departments of Behavioral Sciences and Social Sciences. 
Students will complete the Criminal Justice Minor as they 
fulfill the responsibilities of an academic major. There are 9 
semester hours of required courses and 9 semester hours of 
electives. Students are reminded that they may use no 
more than two of their major courses toward the minor. 

Note: Both POLS 22 70 and SOC 3500 may be taken, in which case one 
counts as "Required" and the other as "Elective". 

Required Courses (9 semester hours) 

CJ 2000 Introduction to Criminal Justice 

SOC 2750 Criminology and 
POLS 2270 Introduction to the Legal Process or 
SOC 3 500 Law and Society 

Note: If both POLS 2270 and SOC 3500 are taken, one counts as 
"Required" and the other as "Elective. " 

Electives (9 semester hours) 

Introduction to Courts 

Women in Criminal Justice 

Correctional Law 

Criminal Law 

Race, Crime and the Law 

Juvenile Justice 

Domestic Terrorism and Hate Crime 

International Terrorism 

Organized Crime and Youth Gangs 

White Collar and Corporate Crime 

Comparative Justice Systems 

Crisis Intervention 

Child Abuse and Neglect 

Introduction to the Legal Process 

Sex, Race, and Constitution 

Criminal Procedure: The Rights of the Accused 



CJ 


2100 


CJ 


2450 


CJ 


2500 


CJ 


2550 


CJ 


2560 


CJ 


2600 


CJ 


3000 


CJ 


3050 


CJ 


3100 


CJ 


3200 


a 


3525 


HMSV 


2400 


HMSV 


3500 


POLS 


2270 


POLS 


2550 


POLS 


2 700 



POLS 3500 Constitutional Law 

SOC 2760 Juvenile Delinquency 

SOC 3500 Law and Society 

Course descriptions can be found listed within the following 

disciplines: Human Services, Political Science, and 

Sociology. Please refer to the course description section for 

more information. 



Economics 



Chairperson 

Michael Turk 

Professors 

Pirudas Lwamugira 
Michael Turk 

Objectives for the Program in Economics 

The Economics Program offers Liberal Arts and Sciences 
courses which focus on understanding the principles of 
economics for private enterprise market economies 
especially, the United States economy, as well as the 
workings of the global economy. The program offers both a 
major and a minor to students who are interested in a career 
in Economics or Business. 




Requirements for the Major in Economics 


The degree of Bachelor of Science in Economics requires 


36 credits: 




ECON 


1100 


Principles of Macroeconomics 


ECON 


1200 


Principles of Microeconomics 


ECON 


2400 


Money and Banking 


ECON 


3000 


History of Economic Thought* 


ECON 


3650 


Intermediate Macroeconomics 


ECON 


3660 


Intermediate Microeconomics 


MATH 


2200 


Calculus for Business 


MATH 


1800 


Business Statistics 


SPCH 


1000 


Speech 


Four courses selected from the following: 


ECON 


1300 


Consumer Economics 


ECON 


2200 


Comparative Economic Systems 


ECON 


2450 


Human Resource Economics 


ECON 


2500 


Economic Development 


ECON 


2550 


Urban Economics 


ECON 


2600 


Public Finance 


ECON 


3550 


International Economics 


ECON 


3700 


Econometrics 


ECON 


3750 


Managerial Economics 


ECON 


4900 


Independent Study in Economics 


ECON 


4940 


Internship in Economics 


ECON 


5000 


Topics in Economics 


GEOG 


3000 


Economic Geography 


BSAD 


4230 


Business Fluctuations and Forecasting 



*ECON 3000 satisfies the Jr./Sr. Writing Requirement. 



International Business and Economics 

The International Business and Economics program provides 
students with an understanding of the rapidly changing 
global economy. It concentrates on explanations of the 
complexities of the business discipline in relationship to the 
theory of international trade and finance and the changing 
roles of international institutions (such as the World Trade 
Organization and the International Monetary Fund). The 
concentration provides the student with knowledge of the 
intricacies of doing business internationally. Students will 
study international marketing and the commerce, trade and 
investments of international business. 

LAS Requirements 

BSAD 1700 Introduction to Computer Information Systems jor 
Business 

Principles of Macroeconomics 
Principles oj Microeconomics 
World Literature I or 
World Literature II 
World Novel I or 
World Novel II 

Introduction to International Studies or 
Global Issues 
World Civilizations III 
Business Statistics 
Calculus for Business 
Speech 

Major Requirements in Business Administration 
and Economics 

BSAD 2010 Introduction to Financial Reporting 

Introduction to Managerial Accounting 

Principles oj Management 

Human Resource Management 

Fundamentals oj Marketing 

Basic Finance 

Business Law I 

International Marketing 

International Business Management 

Business Policy and Strategy 

International Economics 

International Finance Economics 
And either 1 courses from the following list of 
Macroeconomic courses: 
ECON 2200 Comparative Economic Systems 
ECON 2400 Money and Banking 
ECON 2500 Economic Development 
ECON 3650 Intermediate Macroeconomics Theory 
Or 1 courses from the following list of Microeconomics 
courses: 

Industrial Organization 

Money and Banking 

Intermediate Microeconomics Theory 

Managerial Economics 



Education 



See "Teacher Preparation Programs" 



ECON 


1100 


ECON 


1200 


ENGL 


2400 


ENGL 


2500 


ENGL 


3100 


ENGL 


3110 


IDIS 


1200 


IDIS 


1800 


HIST 


1150 


MATH 


1800 


MATH 


2200 


SPCH 


1000 



BSAD 


2020 


BSAD 


3200 


BSAD 


3210 


BSAD 


3 300 


BSAD 


3 400 


BSAD 


3500 


BSAD 


4330 


BSAD 


4880 


BSAD 


4890 


ECON 


3550 


ECON 


3 600 



ECON 2300 

ECON 2400 

ECON 3660 

ECON 3 750 



Requirements for the Minor in Economics 

A minor in Economics requires: 

ECON noo Principles oj Macroeconomics 

ECON 1200 Principles oj Microeconomics 

Four courses selected jrom courses listed jor the 

Economics major. 



English 



Associate Professors Assistant Professors 



Patrice Gray 
Irene Marty niuk 



Lisa Gim 

Michael Hoberman 
Aruna Krisbnamurthy 
Angela Nastassee-Carder 
Margarite Roumas 
Doris Schmidt 
Patricia Smith 
Leon Weinmann 



Chairperson 

Janice Alberghene 

Professors 

Roberta Adams 
Janice Alberghene 
Judith Budz 
Chola Chisunka 
Arnold Gordenstein 
Nancy Kelly 
Richard McElvain 
Kelly Morgan 
Thomas Murray 

Description of the Program 

Through a variety of specialized programs, English majors 
can obtain a BA English-Literature, BA English-Professional 
Writing, BA English-Provisional Certification, BA English- 
Theater, and BS English-Literature, BS English-Professional 
Writing, BS English-Provisional Certification, and BS 
English-Theater. 

Objectives for the Program in English 

The English program offers students a) knowledge of the 
broad field of literature in English, b) in-depth knowledge of 
its diverse aspects, c) the reading, writing, and research 
tools for exploring the field and its boundaries, and d) ample 
opportunity for hands-on experience in related fields. 

Requirements for the Major in English 

Approaches to English Studies (ENGL 2999) provides an 
introduction to the discipline. All English majors and minors 
must satisfactorily complete the course by the end of their 
sophomore year. Transfer students must take ENGL 2999 
during their first year at the college, unless exempted by the 
Department Chair, based on evaluation of transfer course 
work. English majors in all tracks must also successfully 
complete a Senior Portfolio. See individual tracks for 
specific requirements in addition to the above. 

Internship 

The English Department, through its internship program, 
offers an opportunity for seniors and second-semester 
juniors to explore a profession for one full semester of work 
and credit. The internship enables students to apply 
theoretical knowledge and laboratory-developed skills in an 
actual professional setting. Students in the program have 
enjoyed an unusually high level of job-entry success. 

English majors can experience a wide range of professional 
activity in fields such as radio, television, journalism, 
personnel work, library functions (school, public, or 
technical), public relations, law, government, human 
services, and technical productions. New internship 
positions are identified each semester. Department approval 
is required. 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Specializations for the Major in English 

The Bachelor of Arts in English— Literature 

This program requires 36 hours in English. 

• A course in speech or performance fulfills the speaking 
and listening requirements 

• Second-year language proficiency is required 

• Students keep a portfolio of 10 representative English 
papers for Senior review 

• This program also provides preparation for Provisional 
Certification for Teaching Secondary School English 

Required Courses 

ENCL 2000 American Literature L Age of Exploration to the 

Civil War 
ENGL 2100 American Literature IL Civil War to the Present or 

One post-Civil War American literature course 
ENGL 2999 Approaches to English Studies 
One equivalent period course in English literature may be 
substituted for one survey among the following 
requirements: 
Required 

ENGL 2200 English Literature L Beowulf to Milton 
Or choose one of the following: 
ENGL 3030 The Middle Ages 
ENGL 40io Chaucer and His World 

Required 

ENGL 2210 English Literature IL Pepys to Shelley 

Or choose one of the following: 

ENGL 4040 Major English Writers of the i 7th Century 

ENGL 4050 The Novel in the tsth Century 

ENGL 4070 From Classic to Romantic: i750-i 800 

ENGL 4080 Romanticism 

Required 

ENGL 2220 English Literature IIL. Bronte to Rushdie 

Or choose one of the following: 

ENGL 3040 British Literature Since World War II 
ENGL 4090 The 19th-century English Novel 
ENGL 4095 The Age of Dickens 
ENGL 4ioo Victorian Literature 
ENGL 4115 British Modernism 

Required 

ENGL 4020 Shakespeare's Drama-. Text and Performance or 

ENGL 4030 Interpreting Shakespeare's Works 

ENGL 4400 Seminar (for juniors or seniors) 

Electives 

One elective in World or Multicultural literature and three 

electives in literature, at least one 4000-level literature 

course in addition to Shakespeare,- and one 3000-level 

literature course. 

Bachelor of Science Degree in 
English-Literature 

This program is available for students who choose not to 
fulfill the requirement for foreign language proficiency at 
the second-year level. All other requirements are the same 
as for the Bachelor of Arts in English — Literature. 

Bachelor of Arts in English-Professional 
Writing 

This program requires 36 hours in English. 

• A course in speech is required 

• Second-year language proficiency is required 

• Students also keep a portfolio of ten representative 
course papers for Senior review 



Required Courses 

ENGL 2999 Approaches to English Studies 

ENGL 2000 American Literature L Age of Exploration to the 

Civil War 
ENGL 2100 American Literature IL Civil War to the Present or 

One post-Civil War American literature course 
Equivalent period courses in English Literature may be 
substituted for two surveys among the following 
requirements: 
Required 

ENGL 2200 English Literature I. Beowulf to Milton 
Or choose one of the following: 
ENGL 3030 The Middle Ages 
ENGL 40 10 Chaucer and His World 
ENGL 4020 Shakespeare's Drama: Text and Performance or 
ENGL 4030 Interpreting Shakespeare's Works 

Required 

ENGL 2210 English Literature IL Pepys to Shelley 

Or choose one of the following: 

ENGL 4040 Major English Writers of the nth Century 
The Novel in tbc 1 8th Century 
From Classic to Romantic-. 1750—1800 
Romanticism 



ENGL 4050 
ENGL 4070 
ENGL 4080 

Required 

ENGL 2220 
Or choose one 
ENGL 3040 



English Literature III-. Bronte to Rushdie 

of the following: 

British Literature Since World War II 
ENGL 4090 The 1 9th -Century English Novel 
ENGL 4095 The Age of Dickens 
ENGL 4100 Victorian Literature 
ENGL 4115 British Modernism 
Electives 

One elective in World or Multicultural literature, at least 
one 4000-level literature course and one 3000-level 
literature course 

Required 

ENGL 2800 Journalism 
ENGL 3 890 Creative Non-Fiction Writing 
Nine hours from the following courses: 
ENGL 28 to Editing and Publishing 

Journalist to Novelist 

Writing for the Web 

Creative Writing 

Fiction Writing 

Writing Poetry 

Journalism Practicum I 

Writing for Business and Technology 

Feature and Magazine Writing 



ENGL 
ENGL 
ENGL 
ENGL 
ENGL 
ENGL 
ENGL 
ENGL 



3400 
3480 
3500 
3510 
3520 
3810 
3860 
3870 

Recommended 

*ENGL 49 40 Internship 
*ENGL 4950 Internship 
*ENGL 4960 Internship 
* One of the Internships is recommended and requires Department approval. 

Bachelor of Science Degree in English- 
Professional Writing 

This program is available for students who choose not to 
fulfill the requirement for foreign language proficiency at 
the second-year level. All other requirements are the same 
as for the Bachelor of Arts in English — Professional Writing. 



J 



ENGL 



2000 



Bachelor of Arts in English— Theater 

This program requires 36 hours of coursework. 

• SPCH 1700 Voice and Articulation or SPCH 1000 is 
required to fulfill the LAS&S speaking and listening 
requirement 

• Second-year language proficiency is also required 

• Students keep a portfolio of 10 representative papers 
from literature and theater course and/or fully prepared 
audition pieces. The audition pieces may substitute for 
one or more equivalent papers from literature and theater 
courses. The proportion of each should reflect the focus 
of the students, (e.g., performance, dramaturgy, 
education). It is reviewed in the senior year by the 
student's advisor and two other professors in the 
department. Transfer students should consult with the 
chair. 

Required Courses 

ENGL 2999 Approaches to English Studies 

American Literature L Age of Exploration to the 

Civil War 

American Literature II. Civil War to the Present or 

American Drama 

Shakespeare's Drama: Text and Performance or 

Interpreting Shakespeare's Works 

English Literature IL Pepys to Shelley or 

Major English Writers of the 1 7th Century 

English Literature III. Bronte to Rushdie or 

Modern Drama 

Stage Movement 

Introduction to Theater 

Stagecraft and Theater Production 

Acting I 

Acting II 
Electives 

Three hours from the following courses: 
ENGL 3050 20th-century Irish Literature 

Children's Theater 

History of Theater I 

History of Theater II 

Directing the Play 

Art of Dance 

Making Dances: Choreography and Composition 
Students are encouraged to explore all related elective courses above, as well 
as Technical Theater courses offered by Industrial Technology. 
Recommended 
*THEA 4940 Internship 
*THEA 4950 Internship 
*THEA 4960 Internship 
*One of these Internships is recommended and requires Department approval. 

Bachelor of Science in English— Theater 

This program is available for students who choose not to 
fulfill the requirement for foreign language proficiency at 
the second-year level. All other requirements are the same 
as for the Bachelor of Arts in English — Theater. 



ENGL 


2100 


ENGL 


3010 


ENGL 


4020 


ENGL 


4030 


ENGL 


2200 


ENGL 


4040 


ENGL 


2210 


ENGL 


3020 


THEA 


1700 


THEA 


2000 


THEA 


2200 


THEA 


2700 


THEA 


2800 



THEA 


2100 


THEA 


2730 


THEA 


2740 


THEA 


4000 


EXSS 


4050 


EXSS 


4130 



BS in English with Initial Teacher Licensure 

Students within our English major can pursue initial 
licensure as high school English teachers. This program 
provides students with both a broad introduction to high 
school teaching and specific instruction in the theory, 
research and practice of secondary English teaching. 
Students engage in field-based experiences in the school 
setting supervised by our faculty through on-site pre- 
practicum experiences coupled with each teaching course 
and a formal teaching practicum as the capstone experience. 
This program is nationally accredited by NCATE and boasts 
graduates working in high schools throughout the region. 

Students interested in pursuing Initial Teacher Licensure 
must apply for formal admission to the program. For 
information about undergraduate requirements in teacher 
preparation, see the section titled: "Teacher Preparation 
Programs (Undergraduate)". 

The course requirements are those for the Bachelor of Arts/ 
Literature or Bachelor of Science/Literature plus the 
following: 

The Structure and Nature of Language 
Literature for Young Adults 

Introduction to Secondary School Teaching 

Teaching Writing in Middle and Secondary Schools 

Special Methods in English 

English Practicum in a Secondary School 

(300 hours) 

Secondary Programs for Adolescents with 

Special Needs 

Post Baccalaureate Program in English, 8-12 

Students who hold a bachelor's degree and wish to become 
a secondary level (grades 8-12) teacher of English, may 
complete a post baccalaureate program that consists of the 
equivalent of a degree in English and 1 8 credit hours of 
pedagogical coursework in education. 

Students who are interested in the program must meet the 
following criteria: 

• Evidence of a bachelor's degree 

• AGPAof 2.8 or better 

• Successful completion of the Massachusetts Test for 
Educator Licensure: Communication and Literacy Skills 
Sub- test 

Having met the above criteria, students enrolled in the post- 
baccalaureate program will be eligible to apply for graduate 
assistantships. Students enrolled in the program will be 
counted toward the compensation load of the Craduate 
Program Chair or GCE advisor. Supervision of a practicum 
and pre-practicum students in this program will count as 
part of a professor's full-time day load in accordance with 
the provisions of the day contract, unless the faculty 
member chooses compensation from GCE. 

Once accepted, students will undergo a transcript review by 
the Craduate Program Chair or undergraduate advisor, as 
designated by the department and a plan of study will be 
developed that address: 



Required 

ENGL 2870 


ENGL 


2910 


Core Courses 

ENGL 2860 


ENGL 


4 700 


ENGL 


4850 


ENGL 


4 860/ 




4870 


SPED 


3800 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



ENGL 


4700 


SPED 


3800 


ENGL 


4850 


ENGL 


4860 


ENGL 


4870 



• Courses missing (if applicable) in the subject that are 
equivalent to the requirements for the major will be 
determined through a transcript review. Students will 
complete all requirements of the major and license as 
identified in the undergraduate program. 

• Courses as identified below in the teacher preparation 
program (pedagogy courses): 

When courses are in a student's plan of study, he/she will 
complete the plan of study at the undergraduate level, or at 
the graduate level if the equivalent is offered. 

Once the licensure program is completed, students can 
request admission to the graduate program after completing 
additional admissions requirements as designated by the 
department. 

Required Education Courses 

ENGL 2860 Introduction to Secondary Teaching 

Teaching Writing in Middle and Secondary Schools 
Adolescents with Special Needs 
Special Methods in Teaching English 
Practicum I (iso Hrs.) 
Practicum II (l 50 Hrs.) 
Once a student has completed all requirements for 
professional and content specific courses, they will be 
eligible for endorsement in their selected field through 
Fitchburg State College. 

Double Majors 

Students with double majors in English and Early 
Childhood, Elementary, Middle School, or Special 
Education are working toward a BS degree and are exempt 
from foreign language proficiency requirement. 

Requirements for the Minor in English 

The Minor has two tracks, each requiring 1 8 hours of 
coursework in English. 

Track A: Literature 

Required 

One survey course from: 

ENGL 2000 American Literature L 

Exploration to Civil War or 
ENGL 2100 American Literature IL Civil War to Present 
One survey course from: 

ENGL 2200 English Literature I. Beowulj to Milton or 
ENGL 2210 English Literature IL Papys to Shelly or 
ENGL 2220 English Literature III. Bronte to Rushdie 
One literature course with multicultural (C) designation* 
One literature elective, any level, or 

ENGL 1999 Approaches to English Studies 3 cr 

Two literature electives, 3000 or 4000 level 6 cr 

*At least one of the asterisked courses must include material that is pre-i7 [b 
century. A total of six credits must be at the 3000 or 4000 lei»e/. 



3 cr 



3 cr 



3 cr 



from: 




ENGL 


2000 


ENGL 


2100 


ENGL 


2200 


ENGL 


2210 


ENGL 


2220 


ENGL 


2400 


ENGL 


2500 


Three 


advanc 


ENGL 


2320 


ENGL 


2 800 


ENGL 


2810 


ENGL 


3 4 70 


ENGL 


3500 


ENGL 


3510 


ENGL 


3860 


ENGL 


3870 



9 cr 



Track B: Professional Writing 

Required 

ENuL 3890 Creative Non-Fiction Writing 3 cr 

Two literature survey courses in two different areas selected 

6cr 

American Literature I. Exploration to Civil War or 
American Literature II. Civil War to Present 
English Literature I. Beowulj to Milton or 
English Literature IL Pepys to Shelly or 
English Literature IIL Bronte to Rushdie 
World Literature I or 
World Literature II 

1 writing courses selected from*: 
Script Writing 
Journalism 

Editing and Publishing 
Technical Documentation 
Creative Writing 
Fiction Writing 

Writing for Business and Technology 
Feature and Magazine Writing 
*One three-credit advanced writing course must be at the 3000 level. 

Environmental Science 

Chairpersons 

George Babich 

Professors 

Da-hong Lu 
Daniel Robinson 
Howard Thomas 

Objectives for the Program in 
Environmental Science 

The Environmental Science track combines Biology and 
Chemistry coursework as well as several courses designed 
specifically to address important concepts and issues in 
Environmental Science. Detailed requirements regarding 
environmental science can be found under the Biology 
Major. 



Exercise and Sport Science 

Chairperson 

David Antaya 

Associate Professor Assistant Professors 

David Antaya Lynn Champion 

Jeff Godin 

Objectives for the Exercise and Sport 
Science Program 

Program objectives: 

• to prepare relevant professional education supported by a 
rigorous scientific base to students who choose Exercise 
and Sport Science careers, wither in the clinical or the 
fitness setting 

• to provide leadership opportunities through 
apprenticeships, specified internships, and presentations 
and publications 

• to provide career alternatives to students in other majors 
by offering courses related to their chosen fields of 
endeavor 



■ 



• to support the college's liberal arts requirement in the area 
of health and fitness 

• to provide opportunity for students to learn lifetime 
leisure skills 

Description of the Major in Exercise 
and Sport Science 

The Exercise and Sport Science major is designed with 
two career tracks: clinical exercise physiology and fitness 
management. The major is both multidisciplinary and 
interdisciplinary. It is multidisciplinary in that it is the 
integration of anatomy, physiology, physics, psychology, 
and learning theory to describe and explain responses and 
adaptations to exercise and training, and to apply that 
knowledge to enhance physical potential for health, for 
sport, and in rehabilitation. It is interdisciplinary in that it 
draws from biology and business administration to provide a 
foundation in these disciplines to support exercise science 
applications as well as to enhance career preparedness. 

There is a common core of Exercise Science courses to 
ensure a solid foundation in the various disciplines that 
comprise this multidisciplinary field of study, and to ensure 
the ability to apply knowledge in a variety of practical 
experiences. There is an opportunity also to develop 
breadth and depth in the field of Exercise and Sport Science 
as each track has specific requirements, as well as free 
electives. 

Exercise and Sport Science Major 
Requirements 

Prerequisites: The major requires prerequisites in Anatomy 
and Physiology I and II, and Pre-Biochemistry I. In addition, 
General Biology I and II are required for the Clinical 
Exercise Physiology track. All students are required to 
complete the following common core courses. 
EXSS 2040 Motor Learning and Physical Performance 

Functional Anatomy 

Exercise, Nutrition, and Heart Disease 

Exercise Physiology 

Nutrition in Exercise and Sport 

Biomechanics 

Scientific Foundations of Strength Training and 

Conditioning 

Exercise Metabolism 

Exercise Testing and Programming 

Senior Seminar in Leadership and Professional Ethics 

Internship/ Apprenticeship 

Clinical Exercise Physiology Track 
Requirements 

EXSS 2500 Human Motor Development 

EXSS 3600 Exercise Response and Adaptations in Special 

Populations 
EXSS 404 5 Cardiovascular Physiology and Electrophysiology 

Fitness Management Track Requirements 

EXSS 2400 Health Promotion 
EXSS 4040 Fitness Management 



EXSS 


2050 


EXSS 


2060 


EXSS 


2070 


EXSS 


2300 


EXSS 


3020 


EXSS 


3120 


EXSS 


3 300 


EXSS 


3 4 50 


EXSS 


4 200 


EXSS 


4950 



EXSS 


2070 


EXSS 


3020 


EXSS 


4950 


EXSS 


3450 



Liberal Arts and Sciences Requirements 

Some of the prerequisites and courses in the major fulfill 

requirements in the Liberal Arts and Sciences. Additional 

requirements are: 

PSY hoo General Psychology 

PSY 2 200 Human Growth and Development 

PSY 2 3 70 Interpersonal Effectiveness 
In addition to the required courses in Exercise and Sport 
Science, students in the Fitness Management Track are 
required to complete a minor in Business Administration. 
Courses for the minor are: Principles of Management, 
Fundamentals of Marketing, Introduction to Managerial 
Accounting, Microeconomics, Introduction to Financial 
Reporting, Business Law I, and CIS for Business. 

Description of the interdisciplinary 
Concentrations 

The Exercise and Sport Science department offers 
concentrations of study in the field of Exercise Science to 
students in the Biology department. 

Biology/Exercise Science 

Course Requirements 

EXSS 2040 Motor Learning and Physical Performance 
Exercise Physiology 
Biomechanics 

Internship or BIOL 4950 Internship or 
Exercise Testing and Programming 

Description of the Health and Fitness 
requirement in Liberal Arts and Sciences 

Health and Fitness is a required component of the Liberal 
Arts and Sciences curriculum. All students must complete 
three* credit hours in the areas of health, wellness, and/or 
exercise, and the department offers a variety of classes on 
health and fitness topics, in recreational sports and 
activities, and in dance that serve to fulfill this requirement. 

The requirement may be met by the successful completion 
of one of the following three options, all of which include a 
physical activity component: 

Option I - one course selected from Group I 

Option II - three courses selected from Group II 

Option III - two courses selected from Group II and one 
course selected from Croup III 

* Nursing majors must satisfy a one-credit hour requirement that can be met 
by the successful completion of one course from Group II or from Group III. 
(Exceptions: Consumer Health and Standard First Aid) Honors students 
must satisfy a two-credit hour requirement. This may be met by the 
successful completion of Leadership in the Outdoors and Consumer Health. 

Exercise and Sport Science courses as 
electives 

Students in any major may take most of the departmental 
courses for elective credit as long as prerequisites are met. 
Some students like to participate in a structured activity, and 
this is provided in the fitness, dance, and recreation courses. 
Other students have benefited careers or prepared for 
summer jobs by taking courses such as outdoor education, 
camp counseling, or coaching principles. There are many 
options available. 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Dance Minor 

Theory/History/Performance 
Select three courses: 
EXSS 4050 Art oj Dance 



Introduction to Dance Movement Therapy 
Movement Education 

Making Dances. Choreography and Composition 
Independent Study IPracticum 



EXSS 4070 

EXSS 4ioo 

EXSS 4 130 
EXSS 4 900 

Technique Courses 

Select three courses: 

EXSS 1 1 30 Dance Aerobics 

EXSS 1210 Modem Jazz I 

EXSS 1220 Modern Jazz II 

EXSS 1230 Modern Jazz III 

EXSS 1240 Yoga 

EXSS 1310 African Jazz Dance 

Recommended Elective 

The additional three credits can be taken from any of the 

above courses or the following: 

THE A 2100 Children's Theatre 

THE A 2500 Stage Movement 

THEA 3000 Stagecraft and the Theatre Production 



French 



Chairperson 

James Colbert 

Assistant Professor 

Rala Diakite 
Keyvan Karbasioun 

Objectives for the Program in French 

The French Program offers students the opportunity to 
begin the study of the French language and culture or to 
continue study at an intermediate or advanced level. 

Requirements for the Minor in French 

The minor in French requires a minimum of 15 semester 
hours including the following: 

Required Courses 

FREN 2000 Intermediate French I 

FREN 2100 Intermediate French II 

Electives 

Choose at least three of the following: 

FREN 3000 French Civilization 

FREN 3 300 French Literature I 

FREN 3400 French Literature II 

FREN 3 500 French Conversation and Composition 

FREN 4 903 Independent Study 



Geo/ Physical Sciences 

Chairperson 

Lawrence R. Gutb 

Associate Professors 

Lawrence R. Gutb 
Jiang Yu 

Objectives for the Program in 
Geo/ Physical Sciences 

The Geo/Physical Sciences department encompasses the 
disciplines of Earth Science, Geography, and Physics. A 
major track of study may be chosen in Earth Science or 
Geography. In both fields, successful students pursue courses 
of instruction and are supported in undertaking internship 
experiences which prepare them for entry into the job 
market or for acceptance to graduate school. Both fields also 
offer a minor. In addition, all three disciplines which make 
up the Geo/Physical Sciences offer courses which satisfy 
various requirements of the Liberal Arts and Sciences 
Program, as well as those of majors in other departments. 

Requirements for the Major in 
Geography/ Earth Science 

The degrees of Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Arts in 
Geography or Earth Science each require a minimum of 36 
semester hours of coursework. 

Core Requirements 

GEOG 1000 Introduction to Geography 

GEOG 2100 Geology 

GEOG 2800 Map Use and Interpretation 

Geography Majors 

Additional Requirements 

GEOG 2400 Computer Applications in Geography /Earth Science 

GEOG 3400 Population Geography 

GEOG 3 500 Geographic Information Systems 

GEOG 4800 Cartography I 

GEOG 4820 Cartography II 

A course in regional geography as well as additional courses 

are chosen in consultation with the academic advisor. 

Earth Science Majors 

Additional Requirements 

GEOG 2200 Meteorology 

Oceanography 

Historical Geology 

Geomorphology 

Structural Geology 

Remote Sensing of the Environment 

Environmental Hydrogeology 

Astronomy 

Ecology 

Required cognate courses for Earth Science majors 
(to be taken as part of Liberal Arts and Sciences 
distribution and free electives): 
CHEM 1 300 General Chemistry I 
CHEM 1 400 General Chemistry II 
PHYS 2 300 General Physics I and 
PHYS 2400 General Physics II 

• 6 semester hours Mathematics (Math 1 300 or above) 

• 3 semester hours Computer Science 

*Tbose students interested in graduate school should give strong 
consideration to summer field camp. 




GEOG 


2500 


GEOG 


3250 


GEOG 


4200 


GEOG 


4220 


GEOG 


4500 


GEOG 


4600 


PHYS 


2000 


BIOL 


2300 



ENGL 



4 700 



GEOG 


4850 


GEOG 


4860 


GEOG 


4870 


SPED 


3800 



BS in Earth Science with initial Teacher 
Licensure 

Students within our Earth Science major can pursue initial 
licensure as high school Earth Science teachers. This 
program provides students with both a broad introduction 
to high school teaching and specific instruction in the 
theory, research and practice of secondary Earth Science 
teaching. Students engage in field-based experiences in the 
school setting supervised by our faculty through on-site pre- 
practicum experiences coupled with each teaching course 
and a formal teaching practicum as the capstone experience. 
This program is nationally accredited by NCATE and boasts 
graduates working in high schools throughout the region. 

Students interested in pursuing Initial Teacher Licensure 
must apply for formal admission to the program. 

For information about undergraduate requirements in 
teacher preparation, see the section titled: "Teacher 
Preparation Programs (Undergraduate)" 

Core Courses for Initial Teacher Licensure 
in Earth Science 

GEOG 2860 Introduction to Secondary School Teaching 
Teaching Writing in Middle and 
Secondary Schools 
Special Methods in Earth Science 
Earth Science Practicum in a Secondary School I 
(300 hrs.) 

Earth Science Practicum in a Secondary School II 
(30ofcrs.J 

Secondary Programs for Adolescents with 
Special Needs 

Post Baccalaureate Program in Earth 
Science, 5-12 (spring 2005) 

Students who hold a bachelor's degree and wish to become 
a secondary level (grades 8-12) teacher of Earth Science, 
may complete a post baccalaureate program that consists of 
the equivalent of a degree in Earth Science and 18 credit 
hours of pedagogical coursework in education. 

Students who are interested in the program must meet the 
following criteria: 

• Evidence of a bachelor's degree 

• A CPAof 2.8 or better 

• Successful completion of the Massachusetts Test for 
Educator Licensure: Communication and Literacy Skills 
Sub-test 

Having met the above criteria, students enrolled in the post- 
baccalaureate program will be eligible to apply for graduate 
assistantships. Students enrolled in the program will be 
counted toward the compensation load of the Graduate 
Program Chair or GCE advisor. Supervision of a practicum 
and pre-practicum students in this program will count as 
part of a professor's full-time day load in accordance with 
the provisions of the day contract, unless the faculty 
member chooses compensation from GCE. 

Once accepted, students will undergo a transcript review by 
the Graduate Program Chair or undergraduate advisor, as 
designated by the department and a plan of study will be 
developed that address: 



• Courses missing (if applicable) in the subject that are 
equivalent to the requirements for the major will be 
determined through a transcript review. Students will 
complete all requirements of the major and license as 
identified in the undergraduate program. 

• Courses as identified below in the teacher preparation 
program (pedagogy courses): 

When courses are in a student's plan of study, he/she will 
complete the plan of study at the undergraduate level, or at 
the graduate level if the equivalent is offered. 

Once the licensure program is completed, students can 
request admission to the graduate program after completing 
additional admissions requirements as designated by the 
department. 

Required Education Courses 

ESCI 2860 Introduction to Secondary Teaching 

Teaching Writing in Middle and Secondary Schools 
Adolescents with Special Needs 
Special Methods in Teaching Earth Science 
Practicum I (l 50 Hrs.) 
Practicum II (l 50 Hrs.) 
Once a student has completed all requirements for 
professional and content specific courses, they will be 
eligible for endorsement in their selected field through 
Fitchburg State College. 

Requirements for the Minor in 
Geography/ Earth Science 

The Minor in Geography/Earth Science consists of GEOG 
1000, Introduction to Geography, and five additional 
geography courses chosen in consultation with one of the 
geography/earth science faculty. 



ENGL 


4700 


SPED 


3800 


ESQ 


4850 


ESCI 


4860 


ESCI 


4870 



German 






Chairperson 

James Colbert 

Objectives for the Program in German 

The German program offers students the opportunity to 
begin the study of German language and culture. 
Intermediate and advanced work is available through 
independent study. 

Requirements for the Minor in German 

The minor in German requires a minimum of 15 semester 
hours, including the following: 

Required Courses 

GER 2000 Intermediate German I 
GER 2100 Intermediate German II 

Electives 

Choose at least three of the following: 
GER 2800 Modern German Literature in Translation 
GER 2900 Modern German Culture: The Road to Hitler 
GER 3500 German Conversation and Composition 
GER 4903 Independent Study 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Graphics 



Chairpersons 

Frits Lander 
George Bohrer 

Requirements for the Minor in Graphics 

The Interdisciplinary Graphics Minor develops an 
appreciation for all three areas of study while concentrating 
in one of the areas. Students gain a theoretical background 
in Computer Science, a design/applications background in 
Communications/Media, and a production background in 
Industrial Technology. 

Required Courses 

CSC 1000 Introduction to Programming or 

CSC 1500 Computer Science I 

COMM 3810 Graphic Design I 

ITEC 1 500 Graphic Arts Processes or 

COMM 3910 Graphic Arts Production 

CSC/COMM/ITEC Interdisciplinary Graphics Seminar 

A concentration (two courses) in one of the following 

areas: 

Concentration in Computer Science 

CSC 1550 Computer Science II 
CSC 2000 Computer Graphics 

Concentration in Communications/Media 

COMM 3 820 Graphic Design II 
COMM 3 8 90 Computer Graphic Design 

Concentration in Industrial Technology 

ITEC 1510 Typography I 

ITEC 2410 Computer Aided Drafting (CAD) 

ITEC 2500 Offset Lithography 

Note: Students must select a concentration in a department outside their 
major field of study. 



History 



Chairperson 

Michael Turk 

Professors 

Edmund Thomas 
John Paul 



Associate Professors Assistant Professors 

Benjamin Lieberman Laura Baker 



Susan Williams 



Sean Goodlett 
Rene Reeves 
Teresa Thomas 



Objectives for the Program in History 

The History Program offers a variety of courses to all 
students providing a strong foundation in World and United 
States history. 

A major and minor in history, as well as provisional 
certification for teaching history are provided. 

Requirements for the Major in History 

The Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Arts in History 
requires 36 hours of course work. All BA and BS candidates 
must have a concentration (15 semester hours) in a subject 
area outside of history. The concentration is constructed 
with the approval of the student's departmental advisor. 
Recognized minors in other disciplines may be substituted 
for the concentration. 



HIST 


1100 


HIST 


1150 


HIST 


1400 


HIST 


1500 


HIST 


4000 



Required LAS Courses 

SPCH 1000 Introduction to Speech or 
SPCH uoo Argument and Debate 
CSC 1100 Computer Applications 

Required Courses 

HIST iooo World Civilizations I 
World Civilizations II 
World Civilizations III 
U.S. History I 
U.S. History II 
Writing History* 

• One upper-level elective from each of the following 
areas: European History, U.S. History, Non-Western 
(Asia, Africa, or Latin America) 

• Nine semester hours of History electives 

• The Bachelor of Arts also requires foreign language 
proficiency at the intermediate level 

* Jr./Sr. Writing Requirement 

BS in History with Initial Teacher Licensure 

Students within our History major can pursue initial 
licensure as high school History teachers. This program 
provides students with both a broad introduction to high 
school teaching and specific instruction in the theory, 
research and practice of secondary History teaching. 
Students engage in field-based experiences in the school 
setting supervised by our faculty through on-site pre- 
practicum experiences coupled with each teaching course 
and a formal teaching practicum as the capstone experience. 
This program is nationally accredited by NCATE and boasts 
graduates working in high schools throughout the region. 

Students interested in pursuing Initial Teacher Licensure 
must apply for formal admission to the program. 

For information about undergraduate requirements in 
teacher preparation, see the section titled: 'Teacher 
Preparation Programs (Undergraduate)" 

Core Courses for Initial Teacher Licensure 
in History 

HIST 2860 Introduction to Teaching Secondary School 

ENGL 4 700 Teaching Writing in Secondary Schools 

SPED 3800 Secondary Program for Adolescent with 

Special Needs 

HIST 4850 Special Methods of Teaching History 

*HIST 4860 History Practicum I 

*HIST 4870 History Practicum II 

NCSS Standards: 

ECON 1050 Introduction to Economics for Non-Majors 

ECON uoo Introduction to Economics for Non-Majors 

GEOG 1000 Introduction to Geography 

POLS 1000 US Government 

POLS** 2500 Political Systems of the Modem World 

PSY uoo General Psychology 

*Students are responsible for their own transportation to and from prepracticum 

as well as practicum sites. 

**POLS 2500 requires IDIS 1200 (Introduction to International Studies) 

or IDIS 1800 (Global Issues) as a prerequisite. 



_B 



Post Baccalaureate Program in History, 8-12 

Students who hold a bachelor's degree and wish to become a 
secondary level (grades 8-12) teacher of History, may 
complete a post baccalaureate program that consists of the 
equivalent of a degree in history and 1 8 credit hours of 
pedagogical coursework in education. 

Students who are interested in the program must meet the 
following criteria: 

• Evidence of a bachelor's degree 

• A GPAof 2.8 or better 

• Successful completion of the Massachusetts Test for 
Educator Licensure: Communication and Literacy Skills 
Sub-test 

Having met the above criteria, students enrolled in the post- 
baccalaureate program will be eligible to apply for graduate 
assistantships. Students enrolled in the program will be 
counted toward the compensation load of the Graduate 
Program Chair or GCE advisor. Supervision of a practicum 
and pre-practicum students in this program will count as 
part of a professor's full-time day load in accordance with 
the provisions of the day contract, unless the faculty 
member chooses compensation from GCE. 

Once accepted, students will undergo a transcript review 
by the Graduate Program Chair or undergraduate advisor, 
as designated by the department and a plan of study will 
be developed that address: 

• Courses missing (if applicable) in the subject that are 
equivalent to the requirements for the major will be 
determined through a transcript review. Students will 
complete all requirements of the major and license as 
identified in the undergraduate program. 

• Courses as identified below in the teacher preparation 
program (pedagogy courses): 

When courses are in a student's plan of study, he/she will 
complete the plan of study at the undergraduate level, or at 
the graduate level if the equivalent is offered. 

Once the licensure program is completed, students can 
request admission to the graduate program after completing 
additional admissions requirements as designated by the 
department. 

Required Education Courses 

HIST 2860 Introduction to Secondary Teaching 

Teaching Writing in Middle and Secondary Schools 
Adolescents with Special Needs 
Special Methods in Teaching History 
Practicum I (isoHrs.) 
Practicum II (l 50 Hrs.) 
Once a student has completed all requirements for 
professional and content specific courses, they will be 
eligible for endorsement in their selected field through 
Fitchburg State College. 

Requirements for the Minor in History 

The minor in History consists of 18 semester hours with at 
least three courses at the 2000-level or above. 



Human Services 



ENGL 


4 700 


SPED 


3800 


HIST 


4850 


HIST 


4860 


HIST 


4870 



Chairperson 

Margot Kempers 

Professors 

David C. Maloney 
Richard J. Spencer 



Coordinator 

Robert J. Wellman 

Associate Professors 

John M. Hancock 
Lynne Kellner 
Robert J. Wellman 



Objectives for the Human Services Program 

A major in Human Services leads to a Bachelor of Science 
degree. Administered by the Behavioral Sciences 
Department, this program allows students to develop the 
knowledge and skills necessary for entering a variety of 
human service professions. 

Description of the Major in Human 
Services 

The Human Services Program is competency based. 
Through their course work students gain a theoretical and 
conceptual base, and develop generic helping skills. 
Students further develop and demonstrate their knowledge 
and skills within several community settings through course- 
related practice and an intensive capstone internship 
experience. These professionally supervised field 
experiences integrate academic study with practical "hands- 
on, real-world" application, and constitute a special 
characteristic of the Fitchburg State College program. 
Additionally, they give students a realistic basis for choosing 
careers while strengthening their ability to compete in the 
job market. Students are also encouraged to gain additional 
experiences through volunteer activities. 

The Human Services Program produces generalists to work 
with diverse clients in many settings, and prepares students 
for graduate study. Course work may be designed for 
students to pursue interests in human services 
administration, aging and gerontology, criminal justice and/ 
or juvenile justice, family and children's services, mental 
health and mental retardation, dance and recreation, and 
other areas. 

Students should meet with their Human Services advisors to 
learn about the recommended course work and career 
possibilities associated with their interests. 

[See the section on Departmental Policies for information 
about the Human Services Program's policies on admission, 
retention and dismissal, and Internship eligibility.] 

Requirements for the Major in 
Human Services 

A. Liberal Arts and Sciences Courses 

Human Services majors are required to take the following 
courses, which also meet LA & S requirements: 

Written and Oral Communication and Computer 
Literacy: 

ENGL hoo Writing I 

ENGL i 200 Writing II 

SPCH iooo Introduction to Speech Communication, or 

SPCH 1600 Public Speaking, and 

CSC uoo Computer Applications 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



1500 


2270 


2550 


2600 


3500 



Government Knowledge (Constitutional) 
Requirement 

May be satisfied by taking one of the following, or, with 
the consent of the Human Services advisor, additional 
Political Science courses focused on the Constitution and 
the structure of government: 
POLS iooo LiS Government 

State and Urban Government 

Introduction to the Legal Process 

Sex, Race & the Constitution 

The First Amendment 

Constitutional Law 
Basic Informational Courses in the 
Behavioral Sciences: 
PSY iioo General Psychology 
SOC iioo Introduction to Sociology 
PSY 2200 Human Growth & Development * 
PSY 2350 Abnormal Psychology 

* With the documented approval of their Human Services advisor, students 
may substitute three courses in developmental psychology in place of 
Human Growth & Development. These courses must include PSY 
2210 (Child Psychology) and PSY 2230 (Adolescent Psychology), 
plus either PSY 2240 (Adult Psychology) or PSY 2260 
(Gerontology). 

B. The Human Services Core 

HMSV noo Introduction to Human Services 

Interviewing Techniques 

Research Methods in Human Service Practice 

Group Work 

Professional Issues in Human Services 

Assessment and Intervention 

Management of Case Process 

Internship in Human Services (6 credits) ** and 

Internship in Human Services (e credits) or 

Internship in Human Services (12 credits) 
** Two options exist for completing Internship in Human 
Services: (1) a block placement involving 30 hours per week 
plus a two-hour seminar for one semester (Fall or Spring) 
(HMSV 4890 - 12 credits), (2) 15 hours weekly plus a two- 
hour seminar, beginning in the Fall and continuing until the 
end of the Spring semester (HMSV 4870 & HMSV 4880 - 6 
credits each). 

Admission to the Human Services Program does not 
guarantee entry into Internship. Eligibility for Internship is 
assessed by the Human Services Review Committee 
according to the criteria specified in Departmental Policies. 
Completion of all eligibility requirements at least one 
semester before undertaking Internship and timely 
completion of the application process for eligibility are 
essential. 

C. Human Services and Behavioral Sciences 
Electives 

All Human Services majors must complete a minimum of 6 
credits in Human Services electives and an additional 6 
credits from any program in Behavioral Sciences (i.e., 
Criminal Justice, Human Services, Psychology, Sociology). 
The 6 credits in Human Services must include one course 
(3 credits) from among the following. 
HMSV 2400 Crisis Intervention 
HMSV 2950 Addictive Behaviors 
HMSV 3500 Abuse and Neglect of Children 



HMSV 


2500 


HMSV 


2050 


HMSV 


2900 


HMSV 


3700 


HMSV 


3600 


HMSV 


3800 


HMSV 


4870 


HMSV 


4880 


HMSV 


4890 



Policy Regarding Liability Insurance 

Liability insurance is required of all students taking Human 
Services courses which involve a practicum experience. 
Upon enrolling in such courses, including Internship in 
Human Services, students are automatically covered under a 
blanket policy purchased by the college. 



Industrial Technology 

Chairperson 

James Alicata 

Professors 

San jay Kaul 
Robert Kokernak 



Associate Professors Assistant Professors 

James Andrews James Alicata 

Edward Martens Cap Corduan 

Objectives for the Program in Industrial Technology 

The Industrial Technology Department is unique at 
Fitchburg State College in that it offers two major degree 
programs and seven concentrations, including: 

• Bachelor of Science in Education, with a major in 
Technology Education (121 semester hours) 

• Bachelor of Science in Industrial Technology ( 1 20- 1 26 
semester hours), with concentrations in Architectural 
Technology, Construction Technology, Electronics 
Engineering Technology, Facilities Management, 
Manufacturing Engineering Technology, or Technical 
Theater Arts. 

Liberal Arts and Sciences Requirements 

For students in the BS in Technology 
Education and the BS in Industrial 
Technology, all concentrations 



ENGL 


1100 


Writing I 


ENGL 


1200 


Writing II 


CHEM 


1000 


Industrial Chemistry 


TTEC 


1700 


Evolution of Industrial Technology 


TTEC 


2700 


Man Technology Society 


MATH 


1300 


Pre-Calculus 


EXSS 


1000 


Health and Fitness 


PHYS 


2300 


Physics I 


PHYS 


2400 


Physics II 


CSC 


1100 


Computer Applications 



Requirements for the Major in Technology 
Education (Grades 5-12) (124 Semester 
hours) 

The Technology Education Program prepares students for a 
teaching career. Successful completion of the 61 credit 
major enables the graduate to meet the initial licensure 
requirements of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 
Upon certification, the graduate is eligible to teach in the 
public schools (grades 5-12) in the common core cluster 
areas of: 

• Communication 

• Construction 

• Manufacturing 

• Power Energy and Transportation 




Students complete two courses in each of the four clusters 
for a total of 24 semester hours. These required courses are 
designed to provide the individual with minimum technical 
competencies necessary to teach technology education at 
the public school level. Basic fundamental processes and 
safety techniques are presented. Additional technical 
electives enhance expertise in the Technology/Engineering 
field. Lastly, the professional sequence (15 semester hours) 
provides the students with a combination of theoretical and 
practical experiences in educational pedagogy. 

Requirements for Initial Teacher Licensure 

For information about undergraduate requirements in 
teacher preparation, see the section titled: "Teacher 
Preparation Programs (Undergraduate)" 

Students denied admission to the Practicum can appeal to 
the appropriate department chair. 

Additional Required LAS Courses for Initial 
Licensure in Technology Education 

PSY iioo General Psychology 

PSY 22 30 Adolescent Psychology 

PHIL 2000 Philosophy oj Education 

SPCH iooo Introduction to Speech 

Initial Licensure Common Technical Core 
(30 semester hours) 

TTEC 1710 Tech Analysis 

Manufacturing Cluster 

ITEC 1200 Metal Eabrication Systems 
ITEC 1300 Wood Fabrication Systems 
ITEC 2730 Advanced Manufacturing I 

Communications Cluster 

ITEC 1 400 Technical Drawing 
ITEC 1500 Graphic Arts Processes 
ITEC 24 10 CAD 

Construction Cluster 

ITEC 1320 Construction Systems I 
TTEC 2310 Construction Systems II 
ITEC 2400 Architectural Drawing 

Power Energy and Transportation 

ITEC 1000 Electronics Systems and Concepts 
ITEC noo Electronics I 
/TEC 1600 Energy Systems I 

Professional Sequence (19 semester hours) 

ITEC 3 800 Methods in Teaching Technology Education. 
ITEC 3810 Curriculum Development in Technology Education 
ITEC 4840 Prepracticum Seminar 
ITEC 4 860 Practicum in Technology Education 

Advanced Technical Elective (Pick One) 
Level 2000 or Higher, such as: 

ETEC 3iio Digital Electronics 
ITEC 3340 Constructions Systems III 
ITEC 3 4io Drafting Commercial Structures 
TTEC 3 730 Automated Manufacturing II 



Requirements for the Major in 
Industrial Technology 

The concentrations offered in the Industrial Technology 
Program were developed with the intention of providing a 
pool of highly skilled technologists who can sustain the 
needs of industry within the Commonwealth as we 
approach the 21st century. 
The concentrations include: 

• Architectural Technology 

• Construction Technology 

• Electronics Engineering Technology 

• Energy Engineering Technology 

• Manufacturing Engineering Technology 

• Technical Theater Arts 

Architectural Technology Concentration 
(126 Semester hours) 

The Architectural Technology Concentration is designed to 
develop the technical, analytical, and artistic abilities 
required to perform the design and planning activities 
involved in architectural projects and architectural related 
areas. The planned course sequence introduces architecture 
from a sound base in academic studies which is followed by 
a comprehensive study of design and its applications. The 
program continues with a study of technical systems in 
architecture, and ends with the development of professional 
practices. The learning activities throughout the program 
simulate the tasks that architectural professionals encounter. 

Additional Liberal Arts Requirements 

ART 1650 3-D Design 

ART 3300 History of Architecture 

ART 3500 History of Modern Architecture 

MATH 2300 Calculus I 

Required courses (66 semester hours) 

ITEC iooo Electric Systems and Circuits 

ITEC 1310 Materials Testing 

TTEC 1320 Construction Systems I 

ITEC 1450 Architectural Graphics 

TTEC 1600 Energy Systems I 

TTEC i7io Technical Analysis 

ITEC 1720 Computers in Industrial Technology 

TTEC 2310 Construction Systems II 

TTEC 2400 Architectural Drawing 

TTEC 24 10 CAD 

TTEC 2450 Theory of Architecture 

ITEC 2630 Power and Lighting 

TTEC 3220 Product Modeling and Rendering 

TTEC 3 300 Estimating and Bidding 

TTEC 3310 Mechanical and Plumbing Systems 

ITEC 3 3 40 Construction Systems III 

TTEC 3 410 Drafting Commercial Structures 

TTEC 3 430 Architectural Design I 

ITEC 3460 Architectural Design II 

TTEC 3930 Strength of Materials 

TTEC 4 3 50 Site Planning 

TTEC 4 470 Architectural Professional Practice 






COLLEGE CATALOG 



JT£C 


1200 


ITEC 


1300 


TTEC 


1320 


TTEC 


1450 


ITEC 


1710 


ITEC 


1720 


ITEC 


2310 


ITEC 


2400 


ITEC 


2710 


ITEC 


2740 


ITEC 


3 300 


ITEC 


3310 


ITEC 


3320 


ITEC 


3340 


ITEC 


3410 


ITEC 


3930 


ITEC 


4310 



Construction Technology Concentration (123 
Semester hours) 

The Construction Technology Concentration provides 
students with information essential for managerial 
personnel in the construction industry. Students are 
exposed to a planned sequence of courses preparing them 
for on-site construction related activities. These include 
the coordination of workers, materials, subcontractors, 
and local, state, and federal regulatory agencies. 

Required Courses (66 semester hours) 

ITEC 1000 Electric Systems and Circuits 

Metal Fabrication Systems 

Wood Fabrication Systems 

Construction Systems I 

Architectural Graphics 

Technical Analysis 

Computers in Industrial Technology 

Construction Systems II 

Architectural Drawing 

Statics 

OSHA 

Estimating and Bidding 

Mechanical and Plumbing Systems 

Construction Supervision 

Construction Systems III 

Drafting Commercial Structures 

Strength of Materials 

Seminar in Construction 
An additional 9 semester hours of Industrial Technology 
or declared minor electives are required to complete the 
program. 

Electronics Engineering Technology 

Concentration 

(123 Semester hours) 

The Electronics Engineering Concentration prepares 
students for positions in the challenging field of electronics 
by developing the theoretical and practical skills required 
for this discipline. The skills students need are acquired 
through a planned sequence of courses involving classroom 
work in conjunction with hands-on experience utilizing the 
most modern testing and measuring equipment. 

Required Courses (63 semester hours) 

ITEC 1000 Electric Systems and Circuits 

Metal Fabrication Systems 

Electronics I 

Technical Drawing 

Energy Systems I 

Technical Analysis 

Computers in Industrial Technology 

Electronics II 

Statics 

Automated Manufacturing and Robotics 

Electronics III 

Digital Electronics 

Control Theory 

Engineering Experimentation 

Industrial Electronics 

Electronic Communication Systems 

Microprocessor-Based Control 
An additional 12 semester hours of Industrial Technology or 
declared minor electives are required to complete the 
concentration. 



llbC 


1200 


ITEC 


1100 


ITEC 


1400 


ITEC 


1600 


ITEC 


1710 


ITEC 


1720 


ITEC 


2100 


FTEC 


2710 


ITEC 


2730 


ITEC 


3100 


ITEC 


3110 


ITEC 


3120 


TTEC 


3910 


ITEC 


4100 


ITEC 


4110 


ITEC 


4120 



Facilities Management 

The Facilities Management concentration provides students 
with a general base of HVAC, building utilities and energy. 
The concentration is aimed to find rewarding and 
challenging careers in this fast growing, heterogeneous and 
enormously required concentration. Students learn up-to- 
date methods and techniques that ensure high quality and 
are required in different industries as well as utilities. The 
concentration is the perfect complement of our Architecture 
and Construction program thereby providing a more tightly 
focused program. The concentration integrates formal 
classroom instruction with applied laboratory work, field 
practice and experience for a career in their discipline. The 
following technical courses (51 semester hours) are required 
in the concentration. 

ITEC 1000 Electric Systems and Circuits 
TTEC 1200 Metal Fabrication Systems 
TTEC 1300 Wood Fabrication Systems 
TTEC 1600 Energy Systems I 
TTEC 1710 Technical Analysis 
TTEC 1720 Computers in Industrial Technology 
TTEC 2600 Energy Systems II 
TTEC 2630 Power and Lighting Systems 
TTEC 2740 O.S.H.A. 
TTEC 3310 Mechanical Plumbing Systems 
TTEC 3600 Energy Conservation Principles 
TTEC 3650 Co-Generation and Waste Recovery System 
TTEC 4250 Seminar in Facilities Management 
ITEC 4600 Performance Contracting for Energy Systems 
TTEC 4 700 Project Management 

An additional 9 semester hours of Industrial Technology or 
declared minor electives are required to complete the 
program. 

Manufacturing Engineering Technology 
Concentration (126 Semester hours) 

The concentration is designed to develop both technical 
and analytical competencies required of entry-level 
positions within manufacturing engineering support. 
Students are trained to become resourceful, technically 
competent people who can interface between engineering 
and other personnel within the manufacturing environment. 

The competencies are acquired through a sequence of 
courses involving laboratory experiments and additional 
course work within the Math/Science curriculum. This 
combination provides the student with the practical 
knowledge of manufacturing processes, the ability to apply 
these processes, and the ability to plan, coordinate, and 
implement aspects of production projects. 

Required Courses (66 semester hours) 

TTEC 1000 Electric Systems and Circuits 

TTEC 1200 Metal Fabrication 

TTEC 1300 Wood Fabrication 

TTEC 1310 Materials Testing 

TTEC 1400 Technical Drawing 

TTEC 1710 Technical Analysis 

TTEC 1 720 Computers in Industrial Technology 

TTEC 2 4 to Computer Aided Drafting 

TTEC 2710 Statics 

TTEC 2 730 Automated Manufacturing I 

TTEC 2740 O.S.H.A. 

TTEC 2750 Plastic Technology 

TTEC 2900 Designing and Planning 

TTEC 3 700 Fluid Power Technology 






ITEC 


3710 


UEC 


3730 


ITEC 


3900 


ITEC 


3910 


ITEC 


3930 



Quality Control 

Automated Manufacturing II 

Production Planning and Control 

Engineering Experimentation 

Strength oj Materials 
An additional 9 semester hours of Industrial Technology or 
declared minor electives are required to complete the 
program. One option in this area are courses in plastic 
technology. 

Technical Theater Track (123 Semester 
hours) 

The Technical Theater track is designed to develop a 
general base of technical, analytical, managerial, and 
creative competencies aimed toward entry positions in fields 
of theatrical production. Students are trained to become 
resourceful, imaginative, and technically competent people 
who can integrate engineering and artistic techniques with 
theatrical situations. Students will acquire these 
competencies through lectures, laboratories, and actual 
stage productions. These learning activities, accompanied 
by those of other course selections, provide for a general 
knowledge of theater, and the ability to apply these skills to 
theatrical situations. 

Electives and internships provide flexibility through which 
individuals can pursue areas of special interest. The 
following courses (36 S.H.) are required in the 
concentration: 

Required Courses (6 3 semester hours) 

ITEC 1000 Electric Systems and Circuits 

Metal Fabrication 

Wood Fabrication 

Technical Drawing 

Graphic Arts Processes 

Computers in Industrial Technology 

Computer Aided Drafting 

Production Planning and Control 

Theatrical Design Skills 

Fundamentals of Stage Lighting Design 

Scene Design 

Costume Design 

Advanced Stage Lighting Design 

Advanced Scene Design 

Stage Make Up 

Stage Management 

Portfolio Presentation 

Theater Internship 
An additional 9 semester hours of approved Industrial Technology or 
declared minor electives are required to complete the program. 

Internships 

Senior status students in all concentrations are eligible to 
participate in the Internship Program. The Internship allows 
a student with an appropriate grade average to receive up to 
12 academic credits for a one semester work experience. 



ITEC 


1200 


ITEC 


1300 


ITEC 


1400 


ITEC 


1500 


ITEC 


1720 


ITEC 


2410 


FTEC 


3900 


TETA 


2100 


TETA 


2300 


TETA 


2400 


TETA 


2500 


TETA 


3 300 


TETA 


3 400 


TETA 


3600 


TETA 


4100 


TETA 


4200 


TETA 


4940 



The Minor in Industrial Technology 

(18 Semester hours) 

The minor in Industrial Technology offers a choice of five 
concentrations: 

Manufacturing Technology 

ITEC 1310 Materials Testing 
ITEC 24 10 CAD 

ITEC 2 730 Automated Manufacturing I 
ITEC 3 730 Automated Manufacturing II 
Two approved electives 

Construction Technology 

ITEC 1320 Construction Systems I 
FTEC 2 400 Architectural Drawing 
ITEC 3300 Estimating and Bidding 
ITEC 3 320 Construction Supervision 
Two approved electives 

Electronics Engineering Technology 

ITEC iioo Electronics/* 
ITEC 2 1 oo Electronics II* 
ITEC 3100 Electronics III* 

Three approved electives 

* Students with equivalent course may substitute technical elective. 

Industrial Training 

FFEC 1720 Computers in Industrial Technology 
rTEC 3 800 Methods of Teaching Technology Education 
ITEC 3810 Curriculum Development in Technology Education 

Three approved electives 
Prerequisites: Application and departmental approval; 
prerequisites may be waived based upon an individual's 
experience and background. 

For the Interdisciplinary Graphics Minor, see 
Graphics. 

Industrial/Organizational 
Psychology 

Chairperson 

Margot Kempers 

Objectives for the Program in 
Industrial/Organizational Psychology 

The Program in Industrial/Organizational Psychology will 
provide students with the skills required for successful 
employment in the fields of management, supervision, and 
human resources. The minor in Industrial/Organizational 
Psychology will be especially useful for business majors who 
want to pursue careers in human resources or staff 
management. 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Requirements for the Minor in 
Industrial/Organizational Psychology 

The minor in Industrial/Organizational Psychology will 
require a total of 19 semester hours and will include the 
following courses: 

Required Courses 

PSY 1100 General Psychology 

PSY 2110 Research Methods 

PSY 2 3 70 Interpersonal Effectiveness 

Practicum in Industrial/Organizational 

Psychology (l semester hour) 

Electives 

Choose three courses: 

PSY 2610 Organizational Psychology 

PSY 2620 Work and the Individual 

PSY 2630 Human Factors/Ergonomics 

PSY 2655 Organizational Leadership 

PSY 2 660 Psychology of Human Resources 

Interdisciplinary Studies 

Coordinator 

George Bohrer 

Objectives for the Program in 
Interdisciplinary Studies 

The Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Arts in 
Interdisciplinary Studies degrees provide for individually 
designed, interdisciplinary majors, which allow students to 
work with faculty advisors to develop a course of study that 
responds to individual educational and professional goals. 
Additional objectives are: 

• To enable students to explore multidisciplinary areas and 
to integrate them in a coherent and meaningful way 

• To provide the opportunity for broadly-based Liberal 
Arts and Sciences majors 

• To provide the opportunity for majors that combine 
Liberal Arts and Sciences courses with professional 
courses 

• To provide the opportunity, for a part-time, individually 
paced education, which allows students to build their 
academic confidence and integrate their studies more 
easily into their lives 

Description of the Major in 
Interdisciplinary Studies 

There are many possible combinations of course work 
available through this major, limited only by the breadth of 
courses offered through the day and evening divisions of the 
college. When creating a plan of study, a student must have 
a rationale for a thematic approach to their program. 



Criteria for Admissions 

There is a formal application procedure for students who 
choose to major in Interdisciplinary Studies. The purpose of 
the application is to: 

• Set forth the student's academic and professional goals 
and demonstrate why they are best achieved through the 
Interdisciplinary Studies Program 

• Require students to outline their proposed program 

• Stipulate any required independent exercise or internship 

• Provide college-level courses and grades 

Requirements for the Major in 
Interdisciplinary Studies 

The Interdisciplinary Studies degree is normally awarded as 
a Bachelor of Science. A Bachelor of Arts is awarded if the 
student includes foreign language study through the second 
year of college-level work and concentrates his/her field of 
studies in the Liberal Arts and Sciences fields. Other 
requirements include: 

• A rationale and a thematic organizing principle for each 
program 

• A minimum of 36 semester hours of coursework for the 
major with a college-approved minor within one of the 
three fields 

• A minimum of 9 semester hours in each of the other 
two fields 

• A common core of three Liberal Arts and Sciences 
interdisciplinary courses: 

IDIS i 800 Global Issues 

MUSC 2000 Commonwealth of the Arts or 

Commonwealth of the Ancient Arts 

Logic or 

Philosophy of Human Nature or 

Contemporary Philosophy or 

Marxism 

• A senior-year "Capstone" course intended to help 
students to integrate the various fields of study. This may 
take the form of an independent study or an internship 
(3-15 semester hours) 

• A minimum 30 semester hours of course work completed 
after the program of study is approved and filed with the 
registrar 

• Students must be admitted to the major prior to their 
senior year 

Students' programs must meet the approval of their 
Interdisciplinary Studies advisor. 

Interdisciplinary Studies Major for Early 
Childhood, Elementary 

Students in Early Childhood, Elementary, and Special 
Education are required to select Interdisciplinary Studies as 
their Liberal Arts and Sciences major. 

Required 

IDIS 1800 Global Issues 

IDIS 4000 Capstone with Seminar 

MUSC 2000 Commonwealth of the Arts or 

MUSC 2ioo Ancient Arts 

PHIL noo Logic 



MUSC 


2100 


PHIL 


1100 


PHIL 


2600 


PHIL 


3340 


PHIL 


4430 



Choose 3 Areas: 

Students are required to have 1 minor and 2 
concentrations from 4 curriculum areas in bold below 
approved deemed appropriate by the advisor minor. This 
plan shows the English minor. 

English (Minor — 1 8 credits) 

ENGL 2000 American Literature L. Exploration to Civil War or 

ENGL 200< American Literature II. Civil War to Present 

ENGL 2200 English Literature L Beowulf to Milton or 

ENGL 2210 English Literature II. Pepys to Shelly or 

ENGL 2220 English Literature III. Bronte to Rushdie 

ENGL 2 300 Literature and Disability 

ENGL 2400 World Literature I or 

ENGL 2500 World Literature II 

ENGL 2900 Children's Literature 

ENGL 3000+ Literature elective 

History/Social Science (12 credits) 

HIST iooo World Civilization I or 

HIST noo World Civilization II 

HIST 1 400 US History I and 

HIST isoo US History II 

ECON 1250 Introduction to Economics for Non-majors or 

POLS 1000 US Government 

Math (9 credits) 

MATH 12 50 Functions 



MATH 
MATH 
MATH 
PHIL 



1400 
1700 
2000 
1100 



BIOL 


1000 


BIOL 


1100 


BIOL 


1200 


GEOG 


1300 


PHYS 


1100 


PHYS 


1200 



Math Across the Curriculum 
Applied Statistics 
Informal Geometry 
Logic 

Science (9- 1 credits) 

GEOG 1000 Intro to Geography 
Choose 2 of the following: 

Life Science I or 

Life Science II 

Anatomy and Physiology I 

Earth, Sea, and Air 

Physical Science I or 

Physical Science II 

Interdisciplinary Studies Major for Special 
Education Majors 

Students in Special Education are required to select 
Interdisciplinary Studies as their Liberal Arts and Sciences 
major. 

Required 

IDIS i 800 

IDIS 4000 

MUSC 2000 

MUSC 2100 

PHIL noo 

Choose 3 Areas: 

Students are required to have 1 minor and 2 

concentrations from 4 curriculum areas in bold below 

approved deemed appropriate by the advisor minor. This 

plan shows the English minor. 



Global Issues 
Capstone with Seminar 
Commonwealth of the Arts, or 
Commonwealth of the Ancient Arts 
Logic 



English (Minor — 18 credits) 


ENGL 


2900 


Children's Literature 


ENGL 


2300 


Literature and Disability 


ENGL 


2000 


American Literature L Exploration to Civil War or 


ENGL 


2100 


American Literature II. Civil War to Present 


ENGL 


2200 


English Literature I. Beowulf to Milton or 


ENGL 


2210 


English Literature II. Pepys to Shelly or 


ENGL 


2220 


English Literature IIL Bronte to Rushdie 
One Literature elective at the 3000 level 
One Literature elective at the 4000 level 


Area I: 


Physical Sciences (9-10 credits) 


GEOG 


1000 


Intro to Geography 


Choose 


2 of the following: 


BIOL 


1000 


Life Science I or 


BIOL 


1100 


Life Science II 


BIOL 


1200 


Anatomy and Physiology I 


GEOG 


1100 


Intro to Geography 


GEOG 


1300 


Earth, Sea, and Air 


PHYS 


1100 


Physical Science I or 


PHYS 


1200 


Physical Science II 


Area II 


Math (9 credits) 


MATH 


12 50 


Intro to Functions 


MATH 


1400 


Math Across the Curriculum 


MATH 


1700 


Applied Statistics 


MATH 


2000 


Informal Geometry 


PHIL 


1 100 


Logic 


Area III 


: History/Social Science (9 credits) 


ECON 


1250 


Introduction to Economics for Non-majors 


Choose 


1 of the following: 


HIST 


1400 


US History I 


HIST 


1500 


US History II 


POLS 


1000 


US Government 


Choose 


1 of the following: 


HIST 


1000 


World Civilization I 


HIST 


1100 


World Civilization II 


HIST 


1150 


World Civilization III 



Interdisciplinary Studies Major for Middle 
School Education Majors 

Students in Middle School Education who elect 
Interdisciplinary Studies as their second major are required 
to select two areas among English, Social Sciences, 
Mathematics or General Science (to include Biology, Geo- 
physical Science, and Chemistry) as defined by 
Massachusetts Department of Education. Students will 
select the areas with the guidance of their advisor in 
Interdisciplinary Studies in order to remain in compliance 
with the Massachusetts Department of Education licensure 
requirements for Middle School Teacher. 

Students will complete their capstone during student 
teaching. They will develop an Integrated Unit, which 
incorporates the 2 areas of study. The capstone will be 
approved by the Interdisciplinary Studies Chair and 
supervised by the faculty of the Early Childhood, 
Elementary, and Middle School Education Department and 
the cooperating teacher from the school where the student 
is student teaching. 



Required 

IDIS 1800 




Global Issues 


IDIS 4 000 


Capstone with Seminar 


MLISC 2000 


Commonwealth of the Arts, or 


MUSC 2100 


Commonwealth of the Ancient Arts 


PHIL noo 


Logic 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Students are required to have a college approved minor (18 
semester hours) in Math, History, or English Literature and 
a minimum of 9 semester hours in each of 2 clusters in one 
other area. Students will select courses in each cluster with 
the guidance of their advisor in Interdisciplinary Studies to 
ensure they meet course prerequisite requirements and 
licensure content competencies. Additional semester hours 
within one of the areas may be needed to fulfill current 
content competencies and licensure requirements. 

Interdisciplinary Studies 
(Humanities)* 

Chairperson 

James Colbert 

Objectives for the Major 

The Humanities Department offers an Interdisciplinary 
Studies major. 

Criteria for Admissions 

Students interested in such a major should contact one of 
the designated faculty of the Humanities Department who 
assists the student in the choice and the design of the major 
from the disciplines listed below* The Humanities 
Department maintains the advising records, issues a progress 
report, and informs the registrar. 

Requirements for the BS in 
Interdisciplinary Studies 

Students must fulfill the core LAS requirements and select 
one of the three tracks outlined below. 

Core LA&S Requirements for the BS in 
Interdisciplinary Studies 

A common core of three Liberal Arts and Sciences 
interdisciplinary courses: IDIS 1800, Global Issues, MUSC 
2000, Commonwealth of the Arts or MUSC 2100, 
Commonwealth of the Ancient Arts, and PHIL 1 100, Logic 
or PHIL 2600, Philosophy of Human Nature or PHIL 3340 
Contemporary Philosophy or PHIL 4430 Marxism. 

Track I 

Choose a minimum of 36 semester hours of coursework for 
the major with a college-approved minor in Art, Music, 
History, or Philosophy, a minimum of 9 credits in two of 
the other fields, and the Seminar in the Humanities. 

A. Art 

Survey oj Art Forms I 

Survey oj Art Forms II or 

Drawing 

Design 

Life Drawing 

American Art 

Contemporary Art 

Art oj the Renaissance or 

any other upper-level art courses 



*AR1 


a 50 


*ART 


a 60 


*ART 


1400 


ART 


i600 


ART 


2200 


ART 


2300 


ART 


1720 


ART 


2550 



B. Music 

*MUSC iooo 
MUSC 2000 
*MUSC 2 200 
MUSC 3100 
MUSC 
MUSC 
MUSC 
MUSC 



3200 

3 400 
3500 

4 500 



Art oj Music 

Commonwealth oj the Arts 

Basic Music Theory 

Symphony 

Opera 

20th-century Music 

American Music 

Harmony or 

any other upper-level music courses 



C. History 

*HIST iooo 


*HIST 


1100 


*HIST 


1150 


HIST 


1400 


HIST 


1500 


HIST 


2000 


HIST 


2100 


HIST 


2200 


HIST 


2300 


HIST 


2490 



World Civilizations I 

World Civilizations II 

World Civilizations III 

U.S. History I 

U.S. History II 

Medieval Europe 

20th-century Europe 

British History 

History oj Ajrican America 

Women in U.S. History to 1870 or 

any other upper-level history courses 

D. Philosophy 

*PHIL 1000 Introduction to Western Philosophy 
Logic 

Philosophy oj Education 
American Philosophy 
Philosophy oj Human Nature 
Ancient and Medieval Philosophy 
Philosophy oj Art or 
any other upper-level philosophy courses 
Seminar in the Humanities jor 3 credits. 

Track II 

A second option in the Interdisciplinary Studies 
(Humanities) major combines courses in Language, 
Literature, and History. Choose a minimum of 36 semester 
hours for the major with a college-approved minor in 
French, German, or Spanish,- a minimum of 9 credits each 
in Literature and History and the Seminar in Humanities. 

El . French 



PHIL 


1 100 


PHIL 


2000 


PHIL 


2440 


PHIL 


2600 


PHIL 


3310 


PHIL 


4100 



IDIS 



4000 



FREN 2000 


Intermediate French I 


FREN 2100 


Intermediate French II 


FREN 3000 


French Civilization 


FREN 3300 


French Literature 


FREN 3500 


French Conversation and Composition 


FREN 5000 


Topics in French 


E2. Italian 




GER 2000 


Intermediate Italian I 


GER 2100 


Intermediate Italian II 


GER 2200 


Italian Culture in English 


E3. Spanish 




SPAN 2000 


Intermediate Spanish I 


SPAN 2 1 oo 


Intermediate Spanish II 


SPAN 2600 


Hispanic Culture 


SPAN 2 700 


Hispanic Literature 


SPAN 3500 


Spanish Conversation and Composition 


SPAN 5000 


Topics in Spanish 


The above language programs also require courses in 


literature and history. 



Literature Requirements 

Select 9 semester hours from the following courses: 

ENGL 2000 American Literature from the Age oj Exploration to 

the Civil War 
ENGL 2100 American Literature from the Civil War to the 

Present 
ENGL 2 400 World Literature I 
ENGL 2500 World Literature II 
ENGL 3 300 Women and Literature 

History 

Select 9 semester hours from the following: 
PHIL 1000 Introduction to Western Philosophy 

World Civilization I 

Women in Latin America 

World Civilization II 

World Civilization III 

U.S. History I 

U.S. History II 

Medieval Europe 

20th-century Europe 

History oj Mexico, Central America, 

and the Caribbean 

History oj South America 

Modern Russia 

20th Century Russia 

Seminar in the Humanities jor 3 credits. 

Track III 

In a third option in the Interdisciplinary Studies 
(Humanities) major, students choose a minimum of 36 
semester hours for the major with a college-approved minor 
in Music, Art, Dance, or Literature/Theater,- a minimum of 9 
credits in two other fields, and the Seminar in the 
Humanities. 



HIS I 


1000 


IDIS 


1100 


HIST 


1100 


HIST 


1150 


HIST 


1400 


HIST 


1500 


HIST 


2000 


HIST 


2100 


HIST 


2 700 


HIST 


2750 


HIST 


3300 


HIST 


3350 


IDIS 


4000 



Music 






MUSC 


1000 


Art oj Music 


MUSC 


2200 


Basic Music Theory or 
Upper-Level Music History class 


MUSC 


4000 


Choral Arts* or 


MUSC 


4100 


Instrumental Arts or 


MUSC 


4200 


Class Piano or 


MUSC 


4 300 


Class Voice 


*Tbree one-credit 


music studio courses. 


Art 






ART 


1100 


Art Appreciation 


ART 


1150 


Survey oj Art Forms I or 


ART 


1160 


Survey oj Art Forms II or 
Upper-Level Art History class 


ART 


1400 


Drawing or 


ART 


1450 


Introductory Painting or 


ART 


1600 


Design or 


ART 


1650 


Three-Dimensional Design or 


ART 


1840 


Sculpture I or 


ART 


2200 


Lije Drawing or 

any other Upper-Level Studio Art class 


Dance 






PHED 


4050 


Art oj Dance 


PHED 


4130 


Making Dance. Choreography and Composition 


THEA 


1700 


Stage Movement or 


PHED 


1210 


Modern Jazz I or 


PHED 


1220 


Modern Jazz II or 


PHED 


1230 


Modem Jazz III or 


PHED 


1240 


Yoga 


PHED 


1310 


Ajrican Jazz Dance 



*Tbree one-credit dance studio courses. 



Literature/Theater 

THEA 2000 Introduction to Theater 
THEA 2700 Acting I 
ENG 3000 World Drama or 
ENG 3020 Modern Drama or 

any other Upper-Level Dramatic Literature class. 
IDIS 4000 Seminar in the Humanities jor 3 credits. 

International Studies 

Chairperson 

Michael Turk 

Objectives for the International 
Studies Program 

The International Studies Program provides students in all 
majors with the opportunity to examine international 
historical and current issues to increase their global 
awareness and their abilities to interact with peoples from 
diverse cultures. A minor in International Studies is offered 
by the program. For more information, please contact the 
Social Science Department or the International Education 
Office. 

Requirements for the Minor in 
International Studies 

The minor in International Studies has several options. 
Students should consult an advisor to select the option best 
suited to their interests. A total of 18-credits is required for 
the minor. 

Required 

IDIS 1200 Introduction to International Studies 

At least three courses in the minor must be at the 2000 level 
or above. At least one course must be selected in three of 
the following categories: 

• History, Political Science and Anthropology 

• Business and Economics 

• Art, Music or Dance 

• Language, Literature, Culture or Philosophy 

A. History, Political Science and Anthropology 

The following are courses which can be used for the minor: 

HIST iooo World Civilization I 

HIST noo World Civilization II 

HIST 1500 World Civilization III 

HIST 2000 Medieval Europe 

HIST 2100 Twentieth Century Europe 

HIST 2150 Twentieth Century Germany 

HIST 2 160 Holocaust 

HIST 2 700 History oj Mexico, Central America, and 
Caribbean 

HIST 2 800 Far East bejore isoo 

HIST 2850 Modern Far East 

HIST 2900 Middle East History to 1500 

HIST 2920 Middle East History Since 1500 

HIST 3200 History oj India Since 1500 

HIST 3 300 Modern Russia 

HIST 3 3 50 Twentieth Century Russia 

HIST 3 4 50 Women in Europe History 

*ENGL i ioo/i20o ; HIST iooo or HIST 1 150 or 
intermediate European History elective 

HIST 3 9 50 Contemporary Latin America 

IDIS iioo V^omeM in Latin America 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



IDIS 


1800 


IDIS 


2400 


IDIS 


2500 


POLS 


2200 


POLS 


2500 


SOC 


2250 



Global Issues 
Caribbean Cultures 
Culture and Society oj India 
Contemporary International Relations 
Political Systems oj the Modern World 
Cultural Anthropology 

B. Business and Economics 

The following are courses which can be used for the minor: 
BSAD 4 3 30 International Marketing 

*BSAD 3300 
BSAD 4 3 50 International Business Management 

*BSAD 3300 
ECON 3 550 International Economics 

*ECON iooo, 1200 
ECON 2200 Comparative Economics Systems 

*ECON iooo 
ECON 2500 Economic Development 

*ECON iooo 



C.Art, 


Music, or Dance 


Thefol 


owing 


are courses which can be used for the minor 


ART 


1100 


Art Appreciation 


ART 


1150 


Survey oj Art Forms I 


ART 


1160 


Survey oj Art Forms II 


ART 


2550 


Renaissance Art 


ART 


2900 


Nineteenth Century Art 


ART 


3150 


Early Twentieth Century Art 


ART 


3300 


The History oj Architecture 


MUSC 


2000 


Commonwealth oj the Arts 


MUSC 


3 400 


Nineteenth Century Music 


MUSC 


3 700 


Twentieth Century Music 


PHED 


4050 


Art oj Dance 



D. Language, Literature, Culture 
and Philosophy 

The following is a list of courses which can be used for the 
minor: 

Intermediate French I 
*FREN l ioo or permission 
Intermediate French II 
*FREN 2000 or permission 
Intermediate Italian I 
*ITAL 1 100 or permission 
Intermediate Italian I 
*ITAL 2000 or permission 
Intermediate Spanish I 
*SPAN iooo or permission 
Intermediate Spanish II 
*SPAN 2000 or permission 
Caribbean Cultures 
World Literature I 
World Literature II 
Other Voices 
World Drama 
The World Novel to 19 1 4 
The World Novel Since 1914 
French Civili2ation 
*FREN 2 ioo or permission 
French Literature I 
*FREN 2100 or permission 
French Literature II 
*FREN 2100 or permission 
Women in Latin America 
Caribbean Cultures 



FREN 


2000 


FREN 


2100 


TTAL 


2000 


HAL 


2100 


SPAN 


2000 


SPAN 


2100 


EDUC 


2920 


ENGL 


2400 


ENGL 


2500 


ENGL 


2650 


ENGL 


3000 


ENGL 


3100 


ENGL 


3110 


FREN 


2600 


FREN 


2700 


FREN 


2800 


IDIS 


1100 


IDIS 


2400 



Leadership Academy 
(Honors Program) 



■ 



Director 

Stanley J. Bucbolc 

Objectives for the Leadership Academy 

The Leadership Academy provides an enriched, stimulating 
set of courses for the best-prepared and most qualified 
students. Students will be admitted to the program in the 
freshman year or may apply to transfer into it in the 
sophomore or junior years. Students who complete the 
program do so in lieu of the Liberal Arts and Sciences 
requirements. Students who cannot or do not wish to finish 
the entire program may complete a Leadership minor, those 
students will also need to complete the LA&S requirements, 
not satisfied by completed LEAD courses. 

The goal of the Leadership Academy is to educate leaders 
for the 21 st century. In order to accomplish this task, the 
program has established an integrated set of courses, which 
incorporate six themes (globalization, communication, 
computerization, science and technology, ethics and 
diversity) are taught over a four-year sequence. Students 
must have a high level of proficiency in research, writing 
and computer skills, must be effective team members,- and 
must be able to present their ideas in formal and informal 
settings. They are expected to apply their learning in both 
the college and the larger community through a series of 
extra curricular activities, volunteer positions and service 
learning, co-curricular activities. A gpa of 3.3 must be 
maintained to continue in the academy. 

Criteria of Invitation to Leadership Academy 

Freshmen students are invited to join the Leadership 
Academy based on their high school preparation, SAT 
scores, and documented evidence of leadership potential. 
Upperclass applications will also be considered based on 
gpa and evidence of leadership potential. 

Curriculum for the Leadership Academy 

The Leadership Academy curriculum creates a solid 
foundation of leadership knowledge and skills in the first 
year and builds on this base in each of the succeeding years. 
A minimum of 6-8 credits must be taken per semester. 



First Year 

LEAD iooo 

LEAD 

LEAD 

LEAD 

LEAD 



Curriculum (22 credits) 

Colloquium on Community 1 credit 

Foundations oj Leadership I 3 credits 

Service Learning Project l credit 

Honors English I 3 credits 

Leadership in the Outdoors l credit 

Changing World I (l9 ,h century) 3 credits 

Honors English II 3 credits 

Changing World II f20' 1 ' century) 3 credits 

Leaders in the Humanities I (i9th Century) 3 credit 

Leaders in the Humanities I Colloquium l credit 

Consumer Health l credit 

Second Year Curriculum (8 credits) 

LEAD 1010 Foundations oj Leadership II 3 credits 

*LEAD 2050 Leader in the Humanities II (20th Century) 3 credits 

LEAD 2051 Leader in the Humanities II Colloquium 1 credit 



1005 
1025 
1050 
1140 

*LEAD 1150 

LEAD 1 200 

*LEAD 1250 

*LE AD 2000 

LEAD 2001 

LEAD 2030 



I 



Third Year Curriculum (9 credits) 

*LEAD 3000 Physics, Mathematics, and Technology 4 credits 
*LEAD 3050 Biology, Mathematics, and Technology 4 credits 
LEAD 305< Biology/Mathematics/Ethics Colloquium i credit 

Fourth Year Curriculum 

Senior Thesis/Project/Research and Writing 6 credits 
**Language Requirement 12 credits 

**All students in the Leadership Academy will also demonstrate proficiency 
in a foreign language at the intermediate level. This requirement can he 
met through examination or coursework. 

* A student may take the Changing World, Leaders in the Humanities, or 
Physics/Mathematics/Technology -Biology /Mathematics/Technology in 
years other than those specified. Collocjuia that complement these courses 
should be taken concurrently. 

Leadership Minor 

Students who enter the program as sophomores or juniors, 
or students who choose to leave the program before 
completion, may elect to complete a Leadership Minor. A 
minimum of 6-8 credits must be taken per semester. The 
minor will consist of the following courses: 

Required 

LEAD 1005 Foundations of Leadership I 3 credits 

LEAD ioioFoundations of Leadership II 3 credits 

Select one or two of the following year-long course 

sequences: 

LEAD 1050 Honors English I and 

LEAD 1 200 Honors English II 6 credits 

LEAD 1 1 50 Changing World I and 

LEAD 1250 Changing World II 6 credits 

LEAD 2000 Leaders in the Humanities (i9 ,h century) and 

LEAD 2050 Leaders in the Humanities (20* century) 6 credits 

LEAD 3000 Physics, Mathematics, and Technology and 

LEAD 3050 Biology, Mathematics, and Technology 8 credits 

LEAD 4990 Senior Thesis/Project 6 credits 

If only one of the above course groups is chosen, students 

will use the senior project as part of the minor(6). Students 

should consult with the Leadership Academy Director and 

their major advisors if they wish to use this option. 

Two colloquia,- 1 credits 

These will be the colloquia which are taught concurrently 

with the courses the student has chosen as part of his/her 

minor: 

Our Many Communities i credit 

Leaders in the Humanities I Colloquium i credit 

Leader in the Humanities II Colloquium i credit 

Biology I Mathematics/Ethics i credit 

Service Learning Project i credit 

Leadership in the Outdoors l credit 

Leadership Academy Club 

All students in the Leadership Academy are also members of 
the Leadership Academy Club. The club is active in campus 
life and sponsors speakers and performers for the campus as 
well as trips to cultural sites and performances. 



Mathematics 



LEAD 


1000 


LEAD 


2001 


LEAD 


2051 


LEAD 


3051 


LEAD 


1025 


LEAD 


1140 



Chairperson 

Claire McAndrew 

Professors 

Christine Cosgrove 
Lucy Dechene 



Instructor 

Judith Salmon 



Associate Professors Assistant Professors 



Gerald Higdon 
Claire McAndrew 
Mark Snyder 
Abdulkeni Zekeria 



Mary Ann Barhato 
Robert Bentley 



Objectives for the Program in Mathematics 

The Department of Mathematics serves all students at the 
college. Mathematics majors receive a comprehensive 
foundation in abstract and applied mathematics as 
preparation for graduate school or a professional career. 
Minors in Mathematics receive the mathematical foundation 
needed for advanced work in their major field. 

The department also provides non-majors with courses for 
their major or with courses for their Liberal Arts and 
Sciences Program. 

Requirements for the Major in Mathematics 

The Bachelor of Science and the Bachelor of Arts in 

Mathematics is comprised of 42 credit hours of course work, 

including the following requirements: 

MATH 2300 Calculus I 

MATH 2400 Calculus II 

MATH 2500 Introduction to Mathematical Thought 

MATH 2600 Linear Algebra 

MATH 3300 Calculus III 

MATH 3400 Calculus IV 

MATH 4300 Abstract Algebra 

MATH 3900 Mathematics Seminar 

At least 1 5 additional semester hours of advanced 

mathematics (3000 or 4000 level, nine of which must be at 

the 4000 level) 

One course in Computer Science at the level of 
CSC 1500 or higher. 

Note: MATH 4 850, MATH 4 860, and MATH 4 870 are not advanced 
mathematics courses. 

Graduate courses may be substituted for 4000 level courses. 
The Bachelor of Arts degree requires foreign language 
proficiency at the second year level. 

Mathematics majors fulfill the Listening and Speaking 
requirements of the Liberal Arts and Sciences program by 
successfully completing one of the following three courses: 
SPCH iooo Introduction to Speech Communication 
SPCH noo Argumentation and Debate 
SPCH 1200 Business and Career Communication 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



BS in Mathematics with Initial Teacher 
Licensure 

Students within our Mathematics major can pursue initial 
licensure as high school Mathematics teachers. This 
program provides students with both a broad introduction 
to high school teaching and specific instruction in the 
theory, research and practice of secondary Mathematics 
teaching. Students engage in field-based experiences in the 
school setting supervised by our faculty through on-site pre- 
practicum experiences coupled with each teaching course 
and a formal teaching practicum as the capstone experience. 
This program is nationally accredited by NCATE and boasts 
graduates working in high schools throughout the region. 

Students interested in pursuing Initial Teacher Licensure 
must apply for formal admission to the program. 

For information about undergraduate requirements in 
teacher preparation, see the section titled: "Teacher 
Preparation Programs (Undergraduate)" 

Students denied admission to the Practicum can appeal to 
the appropriate department chair. 

Core Courses for Initial Licensure in 
Mathematics 

MATH 2860 Introduction to Secondary School Teaching 
Geometry 

Teaching Writing in Middle and Secondary Schools 
Probability and Statistics I 
Special Methods in Mathematics 
Mathematics Practicum in Secondary School 
(isohrs.) 

Mathematics Practicum in Secondary School 
[isohrs.) 

Secondary Program jor Adolescents with Special 
Needs 

Post Baccalaureate Program in 
Mathematics, 8-12 

Students who hold a bachelor's degree and wish to become 
a secondary level (grades 8-12) teacher of Mathematics, 
may complete a post baccalaureate program that consists of 
the equivalent of a degree in the subject the individual 
wishes to teach and 18 credit hours of pedagogical 
coursework in education. 

Students who are interested in the program must meet the 
following criteria: 

• Evidence of a bachelor's degree 

• A CPA of 2.8 or better 

• Successful completion of the Massachusetts Test for 
Educator Licensure: Communication and Literacy Skills 
Sub -test 

Having met the above criteria, students enrolled in the post- 
baccalaureate program will be eligible to apply for graduate 
assistantships. Students enrolled in the program will be 
counted toward the compensation load of the Craduate 
Program Chair or CCE advisor. Supervision of a practicum 
and pre-practicum students in this program will count as 
part of a professor's full-time day load in accordance with 
the provisions of the day contract, unless the faculty 
member chooses compensation from CCE. 



MATH 


3000 


ENGL 


4700 


MATH 


4 200 


MATH 


4850 


MATH 


4860 


MATH 


4870 


SPED 


3800 



Once accepted, students will undergo a transcript review by 
the Graduate Program Chair or undergraduate advisor, as 
designated by the department and a plan of study will be 
developed that address: 

• Courses missing (if applicable) in the subject that are 
equivalent to the requirements for the major will be 
determined through a transcript review. Students will 
complete all requirements of the major and license as 
identified in the undergraduate program. 

• Courses as identified below in the teacher preparation 
program (pedagogy courses): 

When courses are in a student's plan of study he/she will 
complete the plan of study at the undergraduate level, or at 
the graduate level if the equivalent is offered. 

Once the licensure program is completed, students can 
request admission to the graduate program after completing 
additional admissions requirements as designated by the 
department. 

Required Education Courses 

MATH 2860 Introduction to Secondary Education 

Teaching Writing in Middle and Secondary Schools 
Adolescents with Special Needs 
Special Methods in Teaching Math 
Practicum I (isoHrs.) 
Practicum II (l 50 Hrs.J 
Once a student has completed all requirements for 
professional and content specific courses, they will be 
eligible for endorsement in their selected field through 
Fitchburg State College. 

Requirements for the Minor in Mathematics 

A minor in Mathematics is comprised of 23 semester hours: 

• Eight semester hours of Calculus I and II 

• Either Abstract or Linear Algebra 

• Four elective courses chosen as follows: 
one or more at the 3000-Ievel 

one or more at the 4000-level 

At most one of Discrete Mathematics, Informal 
Geometry or Introduction to Mathematical Thought 



ENGL 


4700 


SPED 


3800 


MATH 


4850 


MATH 


4860 


MATH 


4870 



Music 



Chairperson 

James Colbert 

Professors Assistant Professor 

Robin Dinda Michele Caniato 

lane Fiske Marjorie Ness 

Objectives for the Program in Music 

The Program in Music provides students with the 
opportunity to actively engage in music through 
instrumental or choral work. Courses are designed to fulfill 
the arts requirement in the Liberal Arts and Sciences 
Program and to study the history of music at different times 
across many cultures. A minor is also available. 



*5 



•m 



Requirements for the Minor in Music 

The minor in Music requires 1 8 semester hours of course 

work. Students must take the following: 

MUSC 1000 Art oj Music or 

MUSC 2000 Commonwealth of the Arts 

MUSC 2200 Basic Music Theory 

MUSC 4500 Harmony I 

MUSC 4000 Choral Arts or 

MUSC 4 too Instrumental Arts (3 credits) 

The remaining 6 semester hours may be taken from 

approved music electives. 



Nursing 



Chairperson 

Andrea Wallen 

Professors 

Sheila Fredette 
Andrea Wallen 
Jean Worjolk 



Associate Professors Assistant Professors 

Barbara May Magda Bechar 

Linda McKay Robert Dumas 

Barbara Powers Richard Trifilo 

Ann Scannell 
Elizabeth Shaw 

Part-Time Instructors 

Jean Kressy 
Tara Mariolis 
Lola Meskauskas 



Instructor 

Rachel Boersma 
Christine Devine 
Sheila Sbrogna 

Objectives for the Program in Nursing 

The degree offered is the Bachelor of Science with a major 
in nursing. The purpose of the program in nursing is to 
prepare practitioners of professional nursing who can 
assume responsibility for planning and providing health care 
to individuals, families, and groups in a variety of settings in 
collaboration with other professionals. The program also 
provides a solid foundation for graduate study in nursing. 

Description of the Program in Nursing 

As the first Department of Nursing in the State College 
System, the Nursing Program has a long and proud history. 

It iS: 

• Approved by the Board of Registration in Nursing 

• Accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing 
Education (CCNE) 

• Supporting a chapter of Sigma Theta Tau, the 
International Nursing Honor Society 

• Supporting a chapter of the National Student Nurses 
Association 

It provides well equipped laboratories for on-campus 
practice of clinical skills with computer and audiovisual 
support, and a wide variety of client care opportunities in 
affiliated health care agencies. All senior students participate 
in a 21 hour/week preceptorship capstone clinical 
experience. Its graduates are in great demand in the 
professional job market, and many have earned advanced 
degrees and have progressed to leadership positions in 
practice, administration, research, and education. 



Criteria for Admissions and Retention 

The majority of departmental admissions are freshmen 
selected from qualified high school graduates. One year of 
high school chemistry is required for admission into the 
nursing major. The department also admits transfer students, 
who are not licensed nurses, but who meet the prerequisites 
for the sophomore year courses, as well as registered nurses 
who meet the prerequisites of the alternative junior year. 

Registered Nurses are provided with a variety of 
opportunities to achieve advanced placement in Liberal 
Arts and Sciences courses and in nursing via the CLEP 
program, College examinations, Ace II examinations, a 
Portfolio Review Process, and Articulation Agreements 
with numerous community colleges. 

As a professional preparation program, successful progress 
in the major necessitates requirements in addition to those 
common to all college students. These include: 

• A grade of 2.5 or better in Anatomy and Physiology I and 
II, Pre-Biochemistry I, Elements of Human Biochemistry 
and Organic Chemistry, Survey of Micro Organisms and 
Nutrition. 

• A grade of 82 or above on the Accuplacer Math Readiness 
Exam, or completion of Basic Math I and/or Basic Math II 
with a grade of 2.5 or better. This requirement must be 
completed prior to enrolling in NURS 2900. 

• A grade of 2.5 or better in all nursing (NURS) courses. 
Students who fail to earn a 2.5 in one nursing course have 
a one time option to repeat this course one time. Failure 
to achieve a 2.5 when the course is repeated will result in 
disenrollment from the major. 

• Students may repeat only one nursing course 
throughout the entire program. 

• Any subsequent grade of less than 2.5 in other nursing 
courses will result in disenrollment from the major. 

• Students are responsible for providing their own 
transportation to clinical practice sites. 

• Annually, prior to participation in any clinical nursing 
course, students must present evidence to the 
Department of Nursing of: Hepatitis B and other 
immunizations, CPR certification/recertification at the 
professional level, a physical examination, and 
Massachusetts nursing licensure (if applicable). 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts regulations regarding 
health records for students enrolled in the health 
sciences must be met through the campus Health 
Service office. 

• A Criminal Offense Record Investigation (CORI) and/ 
or sexual Offense Record Investigation (SORI) may be 
required by multiple clinical agencies. This may involve 
additional student costs. 

Requirements for the Major in Nursing 

Graduation requires a minimum of 124 semester hours of 
credit comprised of: 

• 62 credit hours of nursing 

• 40 hours of required core courses in Liberal Arts and 
Sciences 

• 22 hours of elective Liberal Arts and Sciences credits 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Each semester of nursing after the pre-nursing freshman 
year includes a clinical/laboratory component as well as 
classroom theory. A variety of inpatient and community 
agencies in central and eastern Massachusetts offer practice 
opportunities to assist students toward professional 
competency. 

To provide majors with assistance to meet the progression 
requirements and achieve success in the program, the 
department uses individual academic and personal advising 
by nursing faculty, referrals to campus services, and internal 
departmental resources. All senior students select an area of 
nursing practice for concentrated study in accordance with 
individualized learning objectives. 

Part-time study is available to majors in lower division 
course work and to registered nurse students. 

Required Courses 

NURS 2300 Health Assessment 

Pathopharmacology I 
Pathopharmacology II 
Foundations oj Nursing 
Medical-Surgical Nursing I 
Mental Health Nursing 
Maternal-Newborn Nursing 
Medical-Surgical Nursing II 
Pediatric Nursing 
Nursing Research 
Community Health Nursing 
Chronic Illness 
Selective Practicum 
Nursing Leadership and Management 

Concepts oj Nursing I 

Topics Portfolio Preparation 

Concepts oj Nursing II 

Nursing Research 

Community Health Nursing 

Nursing Process in Home Health Care 

Selective Practicum 

Leadership and Management 
Successful completion of the Ace II Examination, or 
articulation or agreements waive RN students from 
sophomore and junior nursing courses. 

Liberal Arts Requirements 



Peace Studies 



NURS 


2500 


NURS 


2600 


NURS 


2700 


NURS 


2900 


NURS 


3200 


NURS 


3300 


NURS 


3400 


NURS 


3900 


NURS 


4000 


NURS 


4 400 


NURS 


4750 


NURS 


4 800 


NURS 


4850 


RN Students 


NURS 


3500 


NURS 


3650 


NURS 


3600 


NURS 


4000 


NURS 


4400 


NURS 


4 750 


NURS 


4 800 


NURS 


4850 



BIOL 


1200 


BIOL 


1300 


BIOL 


1650 


BIOL 


2700 


CHEM 


1100 


CHEM 


1200 


ENGL 


1100 


ENGL 


1200 


MATH 


1700 


PSY 


1000 


PSY 


2200 


soc 


1100 



Anatomy and Physiology I 

Anatomy and Physiology II 

Nutrition 

Survey oj Microorganism 

Pre Biochemistry I 

Elements oj Human Biology and 

Organic Chemistry 

Writing I 

Writing II 

Applied Statistics 

General Psychology 

Human Growth and Development 

Introduction to Sociology 



Chairperson 

Michael Turk 

Objectives for the program in Peace Studies 

Peace Studies is an interdisciplinary minor that guides 
students towards an understanding of how and why conflicts 
originate and the multiple ways that conflicts may be 
successfully managed. The minor introduces students to the 
background and skills they will need to lead their national 
and international contemporaries toward a more peaceful 
world. After completing the minor, students will be better 
able to recognize the factors that lead to conflict, appreciate 
different historical, political, ethical and religious 
perspectives, and draw on a repertoire of techniques for 
achieving and sustaining peaceful coexistence. 

Requirements for the Minor in Peace 
Studies 

The Peace Studies Minor requires 18 semester hours and the 
following: 

Required Courses 

IDIS 1000 Introduction to Peace Studies 

IDIS 2100 Dilemmas oj Peace and War 

At least four courses from the "Origins of Conflict" and 

"Visions of Peace" categories with a minimum of one course 

in each of these categories: 

"Origins of Conflict" Electives 

Intro to International Studies 

Global Issues 

Economic Development 

Race and Ethnic Relations 

Sociology oj Developing Societies 

Social Stratijication 

International Relations 

Third World Politics, Economics and Society 

Psychology oj Women 

Psychology oj Captivity 

ce" Electives 

World Religions 
Interpersonal Ejjectiveness 
Group Dynamics 
Small Group Leaderships 
Cultural Anthropology 



:>•• 



■ 



IDIS 


1200 


IDIS 


1800 


ECON 


2500 


SOC 


2500 


SOC 


2600 


SOC 


3000 


POLS 


2200 


POLS 


3 800 


PSY 


2250 


PSY 


2400 


"Vision 


of P< 


PHIL 


3610 


PSY 


2370 


PSY 


2550 


PSY 


2570 


SOC 


2250 



Philosophy 



Chairperson 

James Colbert 

Professors 

James Colbert 
Ali Errishi 
Walter Jejjko 

Objectives for the Program in Philosophy 

The Philosophy program provides a variety of courses 
which fulfill requirements in the Liberal Arts and Sciences 
Program. These courses explore philosophical inquiry from 
its beginnings to the present, reviewing the history of ideas 
and the development of ethical systems. A minor is also 
available. 



■■ 



Requirements for the Minor in Philosophy 

The Philosophy Minor requires 15 semester hours. There is 

a prerequisite of PHIL 1000 or PHIL 1 100. Courses for the 

minor must include: 

PHIL 3310 Ancient and Medieval Philosophy 

PHIL 3 3 30 Renaissance and Modern Philosophy or 

PHIL 33 40 Contemporary Philosophy 

At least one course from the following: 
PHIL 2500 Contemporary Ethical Problems 

Contemporary Ethical Systems 

Philosophy of Human Nature 

Philosophy of Religion 

Philosophy of Love 

Two additional Philosophy courses 



PHIL 


2550 


PHIL 


2600 


PHIL 


3600 


PHIL 


4500 



Physics 



Chairperson 

Lawrence Guth 

Professor 

Ali Errishi 



Associate Professors 

Lawrence Guth 
Jiang Yu 



Objectives for the Physics Program 

The Physics Program offers a variety of courses which fulfill 
the laboratory science requirement for all students. 

PHYS 1 100, 1200, 2000, are for non-science majors and are 
strongly recommended for satisfying the Liberal Arts and 
Sciences requirements. 

PHYS 2300 and 2400 are the standard non-calculus General 
Physics courses offered at most baccalaureate institutions. 
The sequence is taken by chemistry, biology, computer 
sciences, mathematics, and most industrial technology 
majors. They are also appropriate to the non-science major 
interested in applying mathematical problem-solving 
techniques to physical settings. 

PHYS 2000, 3 1 00, 3200, 3 300, 4 1 00, and 4200 are all 
advanced courses that are offered from time to time in the 
form of free electives to those students who have had PHYS 
2300 and 2400 and have shown keen interest in physics and 
mathematics. 



Political Science 



Chairperson 

Michael Turk 

Associate Professor Assistant Professors 

Eric Budd Rod Christy 

Paul Weizer Joshua Spero 

Objectives for the Program in 
Political Science 

Courses in Political Science are intended for any student 
with a general interest in politics and government. They are 
also designed to provide a proper background for students 
interested in pursuing graduate study or a career in law, 
public administration, or government and political science. 



PHIL 


4200 


POLS 


1000 


POLS 


1100 


POLS 


2200 


SOC 


3130 


SPCH 


1000 


SPCH 


1100 



Requirements for the Major in 
Political Science 

The Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Arts in Political 
Science require 36 hours of course work. All BA and BS 
candidates will pick an area of concentration after 
consulting with their faculty advisor. 

Required Courses 

CSC 1 100 Computer Applications 

Political and Social Philosophy 
U.S. Government 
Introduction to Political Science 
Contemporary International Relations 
Basic Skills oj Social Research 
Introduction to Speech or 
Argument and Debate 

*SOC iooo Introductory to Sociology is a prerequisite for this course. 

Concentrations 

With the assistance of their academic advisor, students wil 
select an area of concentration in American Government/ 
Law or International Politics. Select four courses from: 

American Government /Law 

POLS 1500 State and Urban Government 

Introduction to the Legal Process 

Sex, Race and Constitution 

The First Amendment 

Criminal Procedure: Rights of the Accused 

Public Policy Analysis-. 

Case Studies in American Politics 

Constitutional Law 

Moot Court 
or 

International Politics 
IDIS 1500 Introduction to Peace Studies 

Global Issues 

Political Systems of the Modern World 

Asian Politics and Culture 

Third World Politics, Economics and Society 
Capstone 
Each student must select one of the following: 

Internships in Political Science 

Legal Internship 

Senior Seminar in Political Science 

Requirements for the Minor in 
Political Science 

The Minor in Political Science includes: 

Required Courses 

POLS IOOO U.S. Government 

POLS noo Introduction to Political Science 

Electives 

Choose four courses with at least one from the above 

concentrations. 



2270 


2550 


2600 


2700 


3000 


3500 


4350 



IDIS 


1800 


POLS 


2500 


POLS 


3 700 


POLS 


3 800 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Psychology 



Coordinator 

Cheryl Armstrong 

Associate Professors Assistant Professors 

Cheryl Armstrong Cheryl Goldman 

John Hancock Sara Levine 

Thomas Schilling Jannette McMenamy 
Robert Wellman 



Chairperson 

Margot Kempers 

Professors 

Carol Globiana 
Paul Girling 
Peter Hogan 
David Maloney 
Richard Spencer 

Objectives for the Program in Psychology 

The goal of the Psychology Program is to educate students 
in the scientific study of human behavior. The program 
combines theoretical, methodological, and applied topics 
enabling students to acquire knowledge and skills that 
enrich their personal lives and work careers. 

The Psychology Program is a component of the Behavioral 
Sciences Department. It serves majors and minors in the 
discipline and offers supportive courses for a variety of other 
programs in the college. 

Requirements for the Psychology Major 

The degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science in 
Psychology require a minimum of 37 semester hours of 
course work in Psychology, beyond the course in General 
Psychology. (The Bachelor of Arts degree requires foreign 
language proficiency at the second year college level.) 

The program is divided into three groups of courses: 

• Required courses 

• Area electives 

• Integrated or pre-professional courses 

Group I— Required Courses 

MATH 1 700 Applied Statistics 

General Psychology (not counted toward major) 

Introduction to Research Methods 

Psychological Statistics 

Experimental Psychology 

History and Systems in Psychology 

Group II— Area Electives 

Choose at least one course required from each area: 
Area 1 — Developmental 

PSY 2210 Child Psychology 

Adolescent Psychology 

Adult Development 

Psychology oj Women 

Gerontology 

Psychology oj Human Sexuality 

Psychology oj Death and Dying 

Area 1 — Adaptive 

PSY 2 1 60 The Psychology oj Speech and Communication 
Psychology oj Personality 
Psychology oj Intimacy 
Abnormal Psychology 
Interpersonal Ejjectiveness 
Psychology oj Captivity 
Social Psychology 
Group Dynamics 
Small Group Leadership 
Work and the Individual 



PSY 


noa 


PSY 


2110 


PSY 


2120 


PSY 


3410 


PSY 


3480 



PSY 
PSY 
PSY 
PSY 
PSY 
PSY 



PSY 
PSY 
PSY 
PSY 
PSY 
PSY 
PSY 
PSY 



2230 
2240 
2250 
2260 
2280 
2320 



2300 
2330 
2350 
23 70 
2 400 
2500 
2550 
2570 
2620 



PSY 


2450 


PSY 


2610 


PSY 


2630 


PSY 


2655 


PSY 


2660 


PSY 


2710 


PSY 


2 770 


PSY 


2950 



PSY 


3220 


PSY 


4 800 


PSY 


4803 


PSY 


4810 


PSY 


4820 


PSY 


4900 


PSY 


4920 


PSY 


4940 


PSY 


4950 


PSY 


4960 



PSY 

Area 3 — Basic Processes 

PSY 3420 Physiological Psychology 



PSY 3430 Perception 

PSY 3500 Psychology oj Learning 

PSY 3530 Motivation 

PSY 3550 Cognition 

Area 4 — Applied Studies 

Psychological Testing 

Organizational Psychology 

Human Factors/Ergonomics 

Organizational Leadership 

Psychology oj Human Resources 

Learning Theory and Its Application 

Principles oj Guidance 

Addictive Behaviors 
Topics in Psychology, when offered, may serve as a required 
elective for the appropriate Group II area. 

Group III— Integrative or Pre-Professional 
Courses 

At least one course is required: 

Advanced Child Psychology 

Teaching Practicum 

Teaching Practicum 

Practicum in Psychology 

Practicum in Psychology 

Independent Study 

Advanced Psychology Seminar 

Internship in Psychology 

Internship in Psychology 

Internship in Psychology 
The remainder of the nine credits in Psychology may be 
earned by taking additional courses from Groups II and III. 

Listening and Speaking 

PSY 2160 Psychology oj Speech and Communication 
Interpersonal Ejjectiveness 
Group Dynamics 
Small Group Leadership 
Interviewing Techniques 

Requirements for Concentrations in 
Psychology 

Any students majoring or minoring in Psychology may 
choose to develop special expertise in one of two areas: 
Developmental Psychology or Industrial/Organizational 
Psychology. In either case, students should consult the 
Psychology Student Handbook for guidelines. 

Concentration in Industrial and 
Organizational Psychology 

This concentration is designed to prepare students to enter a 
wide range of occupations in business and industry. It is 
particularly appropriate for students who want to pursue 
careers in personnel or human resource functions. 

The concentration requires students to take 12 semester 
hours of course work from the courses listed below: 

Organizational Psychology (required) 
Work and the Individual 
Human Factors/Ergonomics 
Psychology oj Human Resources 
Organizational Leadership 
Topics in Psychology (when applicable) 
Industrial and Organizational settings are 

available and strongly recommended for students taking this 

concentration. 



PSY 


23 70 


PSY 


2550 


PSY 


2570 


HMSV 


2550 



PSY 


2610 


PSY 


2620 


PSY 


2630 


PSY 


2660 


PSY 


2655 


Internships in 



Concentration in Developmentai Psychology 

This concentration is appropriate for students who plan to 
undertake advanced work in developmental psychology or 
who seek future employment in related fields. 

Students must take at least 12 semester hours of course 
work from two groups of courses: 

• Courses in Group I provide an introduction to various 
topics in developmental psychology 

• Courses in Group II provide opportunities for in-depth 
exploration of issues through basic research and special 
projects 

of the following courses: 

Child Psychology 

Adolescent Psychology 

Adult Development 

Psychology of Women 

Gerontology: The Psychology oj Growing Old 

Topics in Psychology (where applicable) 
Group III 
Choose one of the following courses: 



Group 


I 


Choose 


three 


PSY 


2210 


PSY 


2230 


PSY 


2240 


PSY 


2250 


PSY 


2260 



PSY 


3220 


Advanced Child Psychology 


PSY 


4810 


Practicum in Psychology 


PSY 


4820 


Practicum in Psychology 


PSY 


4950 


Internship in Psychology 


PSY 


4960 


Internship in Psychology 


PSY 


4900 


Independent Study (when applicable) 



Requirements for the Minor in Psychology 

The minor in Psychology requires a minimum of 18 
semester hours of course work beyond the course General 
Psychology. The Psychology minor is designed to enable 
the student to: 

• Understand and evaluate psychological research and 
literature 

• Choose courses which complement and relate to the 
major 

field of study 

• Explore a particular interest in psychology in some depth 
Accordingly, the following course organization is required: 

Group I 

Two courses are required. 

PSY noo General Psychology 

(prerequisite^ not counted towards minor) 
PSY 21 io Introduction to Research Methods 
Group II 

At least one course is to be taken from each of any three of 
the four areas described under the major: Adaptive, Applied 
Studies, Basic Processes, and Developmental. 

The remaining required courses may be selected from 
either the integrative courses (Group III) or any one of the 
above mentioned areas. Courses may also include: 

PSY 2 2 20 Human Growth and Development 
PSY 2 750 Tests and Measurements 



Public Service Manag ement 

Chairpersons 

Margot Kempers 
Michael Turk 
Joe McAloon 

Objectives for the Program in 
Public Service Management 

The program in Public Service Management is an 
interdisciplinary Minor from disciplines of Human Services, 
Business Administration, Political Science, Psychology, 
Sociology, and Computer Science. 

The minor in Public Service Management focuses on the 
policies and management practices of public service 
organizations in order to strengthen the knowledge base 
and skills set of the student interested in a career in those 
fields serving the public needs. 

Requirements for the Minor in Public 
Service Management 

Required Courses (9 semester hours) 

HMSV 3580 Social Welfare Policy or 
POLS 3000 Public Policy Analysis 
HMSV 3000 Human Services Management or 

Public Administration 
POLS 3000 Public Policy Analysis 
HMSV H50 Community Resources 

Elective Courses (9 semester hours) 

CSC 1 100 Computer Applications Programming I 

PSY 23 70 Interpersonal Effectiveness 

PSY 2620 Work and the Individual 

SOC 2650 Sociology of the Organization 

BSAD 3210 Human Resources Management 

HMSV 3400 Community Organization 

BSAD 3500 Business Law I 

BSAD 4210 Social and Political Environments of Business 

BSAD 4250 Ethical Decisions in Business 



Social Science Minor 

Chairperson 

Michael Turk 

Objectives for the Social Science Minor 

The Social Science Minor was designed for students in 
elementary, early childhood, middle and special education 
who also take an Interdisciplinary Studies major. It also can 
be taken by other majors who have an interest. 

Requirements for the Minor in Social 
Science 

The minor requires six courses, 1 8 credit hours, from among 
the Social Science disciplines. One Economics course, one 
Political Science course, and three History courses, one 
from each of the three History sub-fields (United States 
History, European History, and Non-Western History or 
World Civilizations). The final course may be drawn from 
any Social Science discipline. At least two courses must be 
2000-level or above. 

In schematic form: 

1 Economic course 






COLLEGE CATALOG 



1 Political Science course 

1 US History course 

I European History 

1 Non-western/World Civilizations History course 

1 elective from any Social Science Discipline 

2 2000-level or above courses included in the preceding list 



Sociology 



Chairperson 

Margot Kempers 

Professors 

Augustine Aryee 
Martjot Kempers 



Coordinator 

Augustine Aryee 

Associate Professors 

Patricia Hayes 
Jason Nwankwo 



Objectives for the Program in Sociology 

The sociology major was designed to provide students with 
refined approaches and methods of research and a broad 
understanding of the world. 

The curriculum has been developed to provide the 
theoretical background and research skills essential for work 
concerned with human behavior. Graduates of the program 
are prepared for immediate entry into a wide variety of 
occupations in business, education, industry, social service, 
and public service settings. In addition, many graduates 
continue formal study by enrolling in advanced degree 
programs in sociology and related fields. 

Requirements for the Major in Sociology 

The major requires 36 semester hours of course work in 
Sociology. This total includes 12 semester hours of core 
courses and 24 semester hours of electives. Majors are 
encouraged to take advantage of relevant courses from the 
other three majors in the Behavioral Sciences Department. 

Core Required Courses 

SOC noo Introduction to Sociology 

(prerequisite for all other Sociology courses) 
SOC 2250 Cultural Anthropology 
SOC 3 1 30 Basic Skills of Social Research 
SOC 3160 Social Theory 
Speech Requirement 
Choose one course 

SPCH 1000 Introduction to Speech Communication 
SPCH 1600 Public Speaking 
PSY 2160 Psychology of Speech and Communication 

State and Federal Constitution Proficiency 
Requirement 

Can be fulfilled by completing one of the following 



United States Government 

State and Urban Government 

Introduction to the Legal Process 

Civil Rights and Civil Liberties in the United States 

United States History I 

United States History II 



courses 

POLS 

POLS 


1000 
1500 


POLS 
POLS 


2270 
3600 


HIST 
HIST 


1400 
1500 



Requirements for the Minor In Sociology 

The minor in sociology consists of 18 semester hours in 

Sociology. There is a core of 9 semester hours including: 

SOC i loo Introduction to Sociology 

SOC 3 130 Basic Skills in Social Research 

SOC 3160 Social Theory 

The remaining 9 semester hours may be selected 

according to student needs and interests from Sociology 

electives. 



Spanish 



Chairperson 

James Colbert 

Professor 

Maria Jaramillo 



Assistant Professor 

Keyvan Karbaswun 



Objectives for the Program in Spanish 

The Spanish Program offers students the opportunity to 
begin the study of Spanish language and culture or to 
continue study at an intermediate or advanced level. 

Placement Exam 

Students who have taken more than one year of Spanish in 
high school, but have not yet taken a Spanish course at 
Fitchburg State College, and students who speak Spanish at 
home are required to take a Placement Exam if they wish to 
register for a Spanish course at the course at the college 
level. 

Requirements for the Minor in Spanish 

The minor in Spanish requires a minimum of 15 semester 
hours, including the following: 

Required Courses 

SPAN 2200 Intermediate Spanish I 
SPAN 2 300 Intermediate Spanish II 

Electives 

Choose at least three from the following: 

SPAN 2600 Hispanic Culture 

SPAN 2 700 Hispanic Literature I 

SPAN 3 500 Spanish Conversation and Composition 

SPAN 4903 Independent Study 



Speech 



Chairperson 

Janice Alberghene 

Assistant Professor 

Angela Nastasee-Carder 

Objectives for the Program in Speech 

The Speech Program offers a number of courses to 
students which meet the Speaking/Listening requirement 
in the Liberal Arts and Sciences Program for many 
disciplines. Specific speech courses are integral to many 
majors. Students should check program requirements and 
with their advisors to see which courses are recommended. 






m& 



Teacher Preparation Programs 

Programs 

• Early Childhood (Pre K-2) 

• Elementary Education (1-6) 

• Middle School Education (5-8) 

• Post-Baccalaureate Undergraduate Licensure 
Endorsement Certificate 

• Secondary Education 
Biology (8-12) 
Earth Science (5-12) 
English (8-12) 
History (8-12) 
Mathematics (8-12) 
Technology Education (5-12) 

Special Education 

• Teacher of Students with Moderate Disabilities (PreK-8) 

• Teacher of Students with Severe Disabilities (All Levels) 

• Teacher of Students with Moderate Disabilities (5-12) 

• Technology Education 

The professional education programs at Fitchburg State 
College are under the broad coordination of an Education 
Unit that includes the following licensures and degree areas: 

• Undergraduate and Graduate Teacher Preparation 
Programs 

• Graduate Guidance Counseling Program 

• Graduate Educational Leadership and Management 
Programs. 

Numerous partnerships with schools, educational 
organizations and the private sector are a hallmark of the 
College's commitment to supporting the preparation of 
school professionals. For more detailed information about 
educational partnerships, contact the Office of Certification 
at 978-665-3239. 

Stages of the Undergraduate Teacher 
Preparation Program 

Students interested in graduation with a Massachusetts 
educator's license from Fitchburg State College must 
complete a comprehensive program, working closely with 
their advisor to ensure all requirements for licensure have 
been met. There are three "gates" in the process toward 
licensure. At each gate a student's credentials are reviewed 
to determine their readiness and qualifications to move 
forward in the teacher preparation program and to ensure 
his/her success in schools. Students who are unable to meet 
all requirements at any gate may not move forward and 
should meet with their advisor to determine whether or not 
to continue in the teacher preparation program. 



Gate 1— Formal Admission to the Teacher 
Preparation Program 

All students interested in becoming teachers must be 
formally admitted to the program of their choice, usually by 
the end of sophomore year. At Fitchburg State College, we 
prepare future teachers in the context of a liberal arts and 
sciences education. Students begin their career at Fitchburg 
State College, indicating their interest in becoming a 
teacher and selecting majors that will provide the 
appropriate foundation for meeting the rigorous standards 
required for success. 

The first 44 credits of the undergraduate program is 
devoted to acquiring a broad understanding of subject 
matter across the liberal arts and sciences, and 
demonstrating a command of rigorous content in the 
language arts, mathematics, sciences and social sciences. 

Students interested in teaching at all fields and levels (i.e. 
Early Childhood, Elementary, Middle School, Secondary 
and Special Education) are admitted to a teacher preparation 
program only after they have completed the following 
requirements by the end of their sophomore year. 

• 44 credits of specified content and subject area courses, 

• A minimum gpa of 2.5 overall, 

• Successful completion of the designated "core course" for 
their program, 

• Successful completion of pre-practicum experience(s) 
designated for their program,- 

• A passing score on the Communication and Literacy 
portion of the Massachusetts Test for Educator Licensure, 

• Successful completion of at least two Disposition 
Assessment reviews (one from a faculty member and one 
from a supervisor in a pre-practicum course),- 

• Completion of college's math and reading readiness 
requirements, 

• Completion of the freshman course Orientation to 
Education, 

• Preliminary review of portfolio or equivalent (equivalents 
are defined by the program), 

• Completion of a pre-candidacy philosophy statement,- 

• Recognition of a list of requirements to be completed 
prior to student teaching, including a criminal 
background check, and 

• Recommendation for admittance to the Teacher 
preparation program by the teacher candidate's advisor 
with approval from the Dean of Education. 

Students denied formal admission to a teacher preparation 
program can appeal to the appropriate department chair and 
the Dean of Education. 

Additional course work required for graduation from 

individual programs and certificates 

Teacher certification or initial provisional certification 

requires knowledge of the Federal Constitution and that of 

the Commonwealth. Candidates may fulfill it by 

successfully completing one of the following courses: 

HIST 1400 United States History I 

HIST 1 500 United States History II 

POLS 1500 State and Urban Government 

POLS iooo U.S. Government 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Gate 2— Admission to the Practicum 

Students seeking to enroll in student teaching must 
successfully complete the following prior to the completion 
of their junior year (75 credits); 

• Successful completion of at least four Disposition 
Assessment reviews (one from a faculty member and one 
from a supervisor in pre-practicum course) 

• A passing score on the appropriate content tests of the 
Massachusetts Test for Educator Licensure 

• Positive evaluations of 75 hours of pre-practicum 
experiences 

• Review of portfolio or equivalent (equivalents are defined 
by the program) 

• Positive recommendation by the faculty of the 
department or program 

Application to the Practicum 

In October and March each year, the Fitchburg State 
College Placement Coordinator conducts a meeting to 
explain the practicum application process for teacher 
candidates who have been approved to participate in the 
practicum. Candidates are provided with a list of schools 
that have entered into a formal partnership with Fitchburg 
State College and who have identified mentors who meet 
the requirements of the Education Unit for supervising 
teachers. Supervising teachers must minimally: hold a 
Massachusetts educator's licensure in the area that the 
candidate is seeking, and professional status or equivalent in 
the school/district. Candidates submit their top three 
choices from the list of qualified schools, however at least 
one placement for teacher candidates in early childhood, 
elementary, middle school or special education must be in 
an urban district. Mentors are selected in collaboration with 
the administration of the partnership schools. 

Students' selections are submitted to the appropriate 
program for approval. Contracts are then sent to the 
approved schools confirming the teacher candidate's 
assignment. The teacher candidate then must contact the 
supervising practitioner for an interview. If the supervising 
teacher approves the candidate's placement, the candidate is 
notified by the Educator Licensure office. If the supervising 
teacher objects to the assignment, the Placement 
Coordinator assists the candidate in making a second 
selection. During the practicum experience the candidate is 
expected to follow the schedule of the school, not the 
Fitchburg State College schedule. 

Gate 3— Recommendation for licensure 

Students who have successfully completed the following 
requirements will be recommended for licensure by the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts: 

• Final review of dispositions assessments (at least two to 
have been completed in the practicum, one by college 
supervisor and one by supervising practitioner) 

• Successful completion of the practicum and 
recommendation for licensure by the college supervisor, 
the supervising practitioner and the department of 
program 

• Completion and review of credentials folder 

• Final review of portfolio or equivalent 



• Completion of exit survey by candidate 

• Endorsement for licensure by the Dean of Education 

To apply for licensure, the candidate should follow the 
procedure outlined on the Fitchburg State College web 
site (www.fsc.edu/edcert) which includes: 

• Submission of a Practicum Report Form for each 
practicum experience 

• Print out of a completed on-line application form with the 
Department of Education 

• Request for a formal transcript from the Registrar's office 
which will verify completion of the NCATE approved 
program 



■ 



Education 



Associate Professors Assistant Professors 

Laurie DeRosa David Harris 

Margaret O'Heam Curran Pamela Hill 
Diana Suskind Denise O'Connell 

Glenda Ouellette 



Chairperson 

Laurie DeRosa 

Professors 

Ronald Colbert 
Rona Flippo 
Rosemarie Ciovino 
Charles Hetiel 
George Miller 
Daniel Nomisban 
Sbari Stokes 



The Education Department offers programs in Early 
Childhood, Elementary, Middle School and Special 
Education. 



Early Childhood, Elementary 
and Middle School 

Objectives for Eariy Childhood, Elementary 
and Middle School 

The Early Childhood, Elementary, and Middle School 
Education Programs integrate a grounding in the Liberal 
Arts and Sciences with a comprehensive foundation in 
pedagogy that results in preparation of highly competent 
teachers. The department's strength rests in its underlying 
philosophy that supports the development of educators who 
are reflective, person-centered practitioners able to 
effectively construct, articulate, and apply educational 
theory and research so as to be responsive to current and 
future educational needs of the individuals and families they 
serve. 

The department prepares its graduates to be Teachers of 
Early Childhood (grades P-2), Teachers of Elementary 
(grades 1-6), and Teachers of Middle School (grades 5-8). 

Program of Study 

All teacher education majors graduate with two majors. One 
in Education and one in Liberal Arts and Sciences. The 
Liberal Arts and Science major is required of all future 
teachers by Fitchburg State College. 



Teacher education majors (Early Childhood, Elementary, 
and Middle School) place emphasis on college coursework 
that honors cultural, racial, linguistic and social diversity. 
No less than 39 semester hours of coursework is integrated 
with a variety of field-based experiences in schools. Student 
field-based experiences begin early in the majors and are 
enhanced by strong departmental collaboration with 
exemplary schools and practitioners in the region. Many 
students enjoy opportunities to foster attitudes and skills for 
creative, collegial teaching in the diverse and changing 
environment of our McKay Campus School. 

The Early Childhood Club, Education Club and Kappa 
Delta Pi Honor Society offer students the opportunity to 
grow professionally while meeting with students of similar 
interests. 

Requirements for the Major in Early 
Childhood, Elementary, and Middle School 

Majors in Early Childhood, Elementary, and Middle School 
Education also require a major in the Liberal Arts and 
Sciences. See the IDIS major for Middle School Education. 

Requirements for Initial Teacher Licensure 

For information about undergraduate requirements in 
teacher preparation, see the section titled: "Teacher 
Preparation Programs (Undergraduate)". 

A student denied admission to the Practicum can appeal to 
the appropriate department chair, Associate Dean of 
Education and Dean of Undergraduate Studies. 

Early Childhood Education (P-2) 

Required Courses 

EDUC noo Early Childhood Foundations 
EDUC 1600 Behavioral Science in Early Childhood I 
EDUC 2100 Reading in Early Childhood Education 
EDUC 2200 Language Arts in Early Childhood Education 
EDUC 2400 Fine Arts in Early Childhood Education 
EDUC 3 too Science, Math, and Social Studies in Early 

Childhood Education 
EDUC 4050 Senior Seminar in Early Childhood Education 
EDUC 4862 Practicum in Early Childhood Education I 
EDUC 4863 Practicum in Early Childhood Education 11 
External Requirements 

Liberal Arts and Sciences Distribution which includes: 
BIOL iooo Life Science 1 or 
BIOL l l oo Life Science II 
HIST looo World Civilization I or 
HIST noo World Civilization II or 
HIST H50 World Civilization III 
HIST l 400 US History I or 
HIST 1500 US History II 
PHYS noo Physical Science I or 
PHYS 1 200 Physical Science II 
PSY noo General Psychology 

Liberal Arts and Sciences or Interdisciplinary Studies 

Major 

Elementary Education (1-6) 

Required Courses 

EDUC 2710 Principles and Practices in Education 

EDUC 2750 Science in Education 

EDUC 3020 Teaching Mathematics 

EDUC 3030 Reading in Education 

EDUC 3500 Creative Arts in Elementary Education 

EDUC 3600 Social Studies in Education 



EDUC 3640 Reading in the Content Areas 

EDUC 4100 Language Arts in Education 

EDUC 4iio Foundations Seminar 

EDUC 4 882 Practicum in Elementary I 

EDUC 4883 Practicum in Elementary II 

External Requirements 

Liberal Arts and Sciences Distribution which includes: 

BIOL iooo Life Science I or 

BIOL noo Life Science II 

HIST iooo World Civilization I or 

HIST noo World Civilization II or 

HIST 1 1 50 World Civilization III 

HIST 1400 US History I or 

HIST 1500 US History II 

MATH 1400 Mathematics Across the Curriculum 

PHYS noo Physical Science I or 

PHYS 1200 Physical Science II 

PSY noo General Psychology 

PSY 2210 Child Psychology 

Liberal Arts or Sciences or Interdisciplinary 

Studies Major 

Middle School Education (5-8) 

Required Courses 

EDUC 2710 Principles and Practices in Education 

EDUC 3010 Language Arts in Education 

EDUC 3070 Middle School Concept 

EDUC 3300 Curriculum and Instruction in the Middle School 

EDUC 3400 Reading in the Middle School 

EDUC 3640 Reading in the Content Areas 

EDUC 4010 Seminar-. Foundations in Education 

EDUC/ 4700 Teaching Writing in Middle and Secondary 

ENGL Schools 

EDUC 4885 Practicum in Middle School I 

EDUC 4 886 Practicum in Middle School II 

1 of the following, consistent with Interdisciplinary Track 

EDUC 3020 Teaching Mathematics 

EDUC 2750 Science in Education 

EDUC 3600 Social Studies in Education 

EDUC 4 loo Language Arts in Education 

External Requirements 

Liberal Arts and Sciences Distribution which includes: 

BIOL iooo Life Science I or 

BIOL noo Life Science II 

HIST iooo World Civilization I or 

HIST l loo World Civilization II or 

HIST 1150 World Civilization III 

HIST 1400 US History I or 

HIST 1500 US History II 

MATH 1 400 Mathematics Across the Curriculum 

(Majors who elect Math as a content area for their 
interdisciplinary Major may elect another math 
course to substitute for Math Across the Curriculum. 

PHYS l ioo Physical Science I or 

PHYS 1 200 Physical Science II 

PSY noo General Psychology 

PSY 2230 Adolescent Psychology 

Liberal Arts or Sciences Major or 
Interdisciplinary Studies Major in 2 content areas 
consistent with Middle School Teacher Licensure 
sought. 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Post-Baccalaureate Undergraduate 
Licensure Endorsement Certificate 

"This certificate program will be available to Fitchburg State 
undergraduates who have been awarded degrees within the 
last calendar year, have successfully completed all the 
degree requirements of the undergraduate education 
program in which they seek licensure except student 
teaching and have successfully passed all DOE tests required 
for initial licensure. Completion of this certificate makes a 
candidate eligible for endorsement and does not lead to a 
second bachelor's degree. The Certification Office will 
review individuals who receive this certificate for 
endorsement. If these students are endorsed, they will 
receive the official NCATE/State endorsement statement 
related to their individual initial licensure on their official 
transcript. 



Special Education 



Program Objectives 

The Special Education Program at Fitchburg State College 
offers the oldest and most comprehensive training in the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts. In this program, 
emphasis is on theory, content, and the ability to use 
strategies and resources in working with children and adults 
who have disabilities in the least restrictive or inclusive 
environment. The program embraces an inclusive 
philosophy that emphasizes the similarities of all children 
and young adults. The faculty believe that to work 
effectively with children who have disabilities, one must be 
able to work with all children. Also, special educators must 
work closely with general education teachers. Therefore 
the program offers an elementary pre-practicum and 
practicum experience. 

This program prepares graduates to be Teachers of 
Students with Moderate Disabilities (PreK-8), and Teacher 
of Students with Moderate Disabilities (5-12), and 
Teacher of Students with Severe Disabilities. With 
successful completion of the Massachusetts Test for 
Educator Licensure, General Curriculum, and successful 
completion of a practicum at the elementary level, 
students are also eligible for licensure as an elementary 
teacher (1-6). 

Program of Study 

The program has been developed with an underlying 
belief in the potential of individuals with disabilities. 
Teacher candidates are involved early in their program 
with field-based experiences and academic classes to help 
clarify career decisions and to develop the knowledge, 
skills and dispositions to be effective special educators. 

Special Education Majors in the licensure tracks of 
Moderate Disabilities (PreK-8), Moderate Disabilities (5-12) 
and Severe Disabilities (All Levels) graduate with a double 
major in Special Education and Interdisciplinary Studies. 

Teacher candidates who major in Moderate Disabilities (5- 
1 2) receive licensure for Special Education, 5- 1 2. They 
complete a practicum in an inclusive classroom (5-12) and 
complete the Special Education practicum (5-12). 

Those who major in Severe Disabilities (all levels who elect 
to earn elementary teacher licensure) complete two 



practicum placements: one working with students with 
severe disabilities and one as an elementary teacher (Gr. 1- 
6) in the general education classroom. 

In keeping with the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Licensure requirements, graduates of the program are 
eligible for Initial Licenses. 

Professional Opportunities 

The Special Education Club which is a student chapter of 
the professional organization, the Council for Exceptional 
Children, offers students the opportunity to grow 
professionally while meeting college students with similar 
interests. 

Requirements for Initial Teacher Licensures 

For information about undergraduate requirements in 
teacher preparation, see the section titled: "Teacher 
Preparation Programs (Undergraduate)". 

Teacher of Students with Moderate 
Disabilities (PreK-8), or Teacher of 
Students with Severe Disabilities (All 
Levels) 

The Moderate Disabilities program prepares Special 
Educators to teach individuals with cognitive, social, 
language and academic problems who are included in 
general education classrooms or are in a variety of special 
education settings. Teacher candidates in this program are 
prepared to meet the licensure requirements of the 
Massachusetts Department of Education and for Teacher of 
Students with Moderate Disabilities (PreK-8). With 
successful completion of the Massachusetts Test for 
Educator Licensure, General Curriculum, and successful 
completion of a practicum at the elementary level, students 
are also eligible for licensure as an elementary teacher ( 1 -6). 

The Severe Disabilities program addresses the needs of 
individuals who have severe disabilities, often with 
accompanying emotional and behavioral disorders. 
Curricula focuses on teaching life skills, so that individuals 
with severe disabilities can live as independently as possible 
in home, school and community environments. Teacher 
candidates are also prepared in the elementary curriculum 
and complete a pre-practicum in a severe placement and in 
an elementary classroom. Teacher candidates in this 
program meet the Licensure Standards of the Massachusetts 
Department of Education for Teacher of Students with 
Severe Disabilities. With successful completion of the 
Massachusetts Test for Educator Licensure, General 
Curriculum, and successful completion of a practicum at the 
elementary level, students are also eligible for licensure as an 
elementary teacher ( 1 -6). 

Integrated Professional Pre- Practicum/ 
Practicum (IPP-12 total credits) 

The Integrated Professional Pre-Practicum/Practicum is a 
unique experience that fosters the continuous integration of 
theory and application. It involves a 12 credit block of 
theoretical courses and teaching in a public school setting 
(1/2 days, 4 days a week). 



Teacher Candidates who are in the Moderate Disabilities 
program teach in the role of the Elementary Teacher (Gr. 1- 
6) for 1/2 the semester and in the role of Teacher of 
Students with Moderate Disabilities for 1/2 the semester. 

Teacher Candidates who are in the Severe Disabilities 
program complete 1/2 semester in the role of the 
Elementary Teacher (Gr. 1 -6) and 1/2 of the semester in the 
role of Teacher of Students with Severe Disabilities (All 
Levels). 

Throughout the semester Teacher Candidates receive 
supervised support by college faculty and cooperating 
teachers. Teacher Candidates return to campus for 
curriculum work (see below) that links theoretical content to 
teaching strategies. 

Moderate Disabilities (PreK-8) Licensure 

IPP Curriculum: Moderate Disabilities 

SPED 3500 Behavior Management 
SPED 3550 Reading in Special Education 

IPP Pre-Practicum/Practicum: Moderate Disabilities 

(4 half days a week) 

SPED 3665 IPP Pre-Practicum/Practicum — Elementary 

(Gr. i-6) (half the semester) 
SPED 3 675 IPP Pre-Practicum/Practicum — Moderate 

Disabilities (PreK-s) (half the semester) 

Severe Disabilities (All Levels) Licensure 

IPP Curriculum: Severe Disabilities 
with Elementary Licensure 

SPED 3500 Behavior Management 
SPED 3550 Reading in Special Education 

IPP Pre-Practicum/Practicum: Severe Disabilities 
with Elementary Licensure 

(4 half days/week) 

SPED 3665 IPP Pre-PracticumlPracticum-Elementary 

(Gr. l -6) (half the semester) 
SPED 3765 IPP Pre-Practicum/Practicum — Severe Disabilities 

(All Levels) (halj the semester) 

Student Teaching (Practicum): Teacher of 
Students with Moderate Disabilities (PreK- 
8), Elementary Teacher (Gr. 1-6), and 
Teacher of Students with Severe Disabilities 
(All Levels) 

Teacher Candidates in all licensure programs complete 2 
practica, Monday through Friday, 4 1/2 days in the schools. 
The practica are taken in conjunction with specified courses 
stated below: 

Practica 

SPED 3860 Practicum: Elementary (Gr. i-6) 6 cr. 

SPED 3870 Practicum: Moderate Disabilities (PreK-8) 6 cr. 

SPED 3840 Practicum: Severe Disabilities (All Levels) 6 cr. 

SPED 3845 Practicum: Severe Disabilities II (All Levels) 6 cr. 

Moderate Disabilities Course 

SPED 4001 Assessment oj Students 

with Moderate Disabilities 3 cr. 

Severe Disabilities Course 

SPED 4200 Program Development for Students with 

Severe Disabilities 3 cr. 

External Requirements 

Teacher Candidates address both the speaking and listening 
requirements through the extensive training and feedback 
during the prepracticum and practicum experience. 



Liberal Arts and Science distribution 

ENGL 2900 Children's Literature (PreK-s) Elementary 

GEOG iooo Introduction to Geography 

PSY iioo General Psychology 

PSY 2210 Child Psychology 

PSY 27 io Learning Theory and It's Application 

Teacher Candidates must meet the Constitution 

Requirement by completing: 

POLS 1000 or POLS 1500 or HIST 1400 or HIST 1500 

An Interdisciplinary Major is also required for Licensure for 
Moderate Disabilities (PreK-8) and for Severe Disabilities. 

Teacher of Students with Moderate 
Disabilities (5-12) 

This program addresses the cognitive, emotional, social, 
language and academic problems of individuals in grades 5- 
12 who are included in general education classrooms and 
who are in special education settings. Teacher Candidates 
who complete this licensure major in Special Education and 
in a Liberal Arts and Science Major or Interdisciplinary 
Major. 

Required Courses 

Prior to the Practica 

SPED 2100 Foundations in Special Education 

SPED 2150 Introduction to Individuals with Disabilities 

SPED 2522 Language Arts-. Teaching and Adapting 

Instruction 
SPED 2 5 30 Math/Science/Social Studies for the Inclusive 

Classroom 
SPED 3401 Language Development and Speech 
SPED 3420 Math/Science/Social Studies for Students with 

Disabilities 
SPED 34 40 Reading/Learning Problems 
SPED 3500 Behavior Management 

SPED 3575 Strategies for Secondary Students with Disabilities 
SPED 3550 Reading in Special Education 

Student Teaching (Practicum): Teacher of 
Students with Moderate Disabilities (5-12) 

Teacher Candidates in Moderate Disabilities (5-12) 
complete 2 practica. Teacher Candidates are in the schools 
4 1/2 days a week. 

SPED 3878 Practicum: Moderate Disabilities (5- 1 2) Inclusive 
Classroom (half the semester) 6 cr. 

SPED 3875 Practicum. Moderate Disabilities (5- 1 2) 

(half the semester) 6 cr. 

Course 

SPED 4001 Assessment of Students with 

Moderate Disabilities 3 cr. 

External Requirements 

Teacher Candidates address the speaking and listening 
requirements through the extensive training and feedback 
during the prepracticum and practicum experience. 

Liberal Arts and Science distribution 

ENGL 2910 Literature for Young Adults 

GEOG 1000 Introduction to Geography 

PSY 1100 General Psychology 

PSY 2230 Adolescent Psychology 

PSY 2710 Learning Theory and Its Application 

Teacher Candidates must meet the Constitution 

Requirement by completing: 

POLS 1000 or POLS 1500 or HIST 1400 or HIST 1500 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



A Liberal Arts and Science Major or an Interdisciplinary 
Major is also required for Licensure for Moderate 
Disabilities (5-12). 

Minor in Special Education 

Objectives for the Minor in Special 
Education 

The Special Education minor is designed to meet the 
needs of several groups of students interested in working 
with children and adults with disabilities. The curriculum 
provides students with a background to work with 
individuals with disabilities in a wide variety of school and 
non-school settings (e.g., early intervention, recreation, 
vocational, housing). Students may select courses that 
would serve to prepare them for entry into advanced degree 
programs leading to licensure as a special education teacher. 
Students with career goals outside of the classroom setting 
may choose courses which complement and relate to their 
major field of study (e.g., psychology, human services. 

Requirements for the Minor in 
Special Education 

The minor requires 1 8 semester hours of course work. This 
total includes 6 hours of core courses, and 12 hours of 
electives. Students interested in pursuing graduate work 
toward licensure in special education will be encouraged to 
work closely with an advisor to select courses. 

Required Courses (6 credits) 

SPED 21 50 Introduction to Individuals with Disabilities 
SPED 2510 Students with Physical and Health Care Needs or 
SPED 3 4 to Language Development and Speech 

Electives (12 credits) 

SPED 2100 Foundations of Special Education 

Language Arts: Teaching and Adapting 

Instruction 

Math/Science/Social Studies jor the Inclusive 

Classroom 

Current Issues in Special Education 

Math/Science/Social IStudiesjor Students with 

Disabilities 

Behavior Management 

Strategies Jor Secondary Students with Disabilities 

or 

Secondary Programs jor Adolescents (14-22) with 

Disabilities 

Language Development and Speech or 

Students with Physical and Health Care Needs 



SPED 


2522 


SPED 


2530 


SPED 


3300 


SPED 


3420 


SPED 


3500 


SPED 


3575 


SPED 


3800 


SPED 


3410 


SPED 


2510 



Secondary Education (8-12) 

Clinical Professors 

Laura Baker 
Christopher Cratsley 
Cbola Cbisunka 
Nancy Kelly 
Patricia Smith 
Mark Snyder 
Steven Therrien 
Teresa Thomas 

Objectives for the Program in 
Secondary Education 

A Secondary Education Program is offered for students 
seeking initial teaching certification in the following 
disciplines: 

• Biology (8-12) • History (8-12) 

• Earth Science (5-12) • Mathematics (8-12) 

• English (8-12) • Technology Education (5-12) 

Requirements for Initial Teacher Licensure 

For information about undergraduate requirements in 
teacher preparation, see the section titled: "Teacher 
Preparation Programs (Undergraduate)" 

The secondary Teacher Licensure Programs are housed in 
the academic department of Biology, Earth Science, English, 
History, Mathematics, and Technology Education. The 
programs in Biology, Earth Science, English, History, and 
Mathematics programs share a core of education courses: 
BIOL 2860/ Introduction to Secondary School Teaching 



Teaching Writing in Middle and 
Secondary Schools 

Special Methods in Teaching in Biology 
Special Methods in Teaching in Earth Science 
Special Methods in Teaching in English 
Special Methods in Teaching in History 
Special Methods in Teaching in Math 
Practicum in Secondary School I 



GEOG 


2860/ 


ENGL 


2860/ 


HIST 


2860/ 


MATH 


2860 


ENGL 


4 700 


BIOL 


4850 


GEOG 


4 850 


ENGL 


4850 


HIST 


4850 


MATH 


4850 


BIOL 


4860/ 


GEOG 


4860/ 


ENGL 


4860/ 


HIST 


4860/ 


MATH 


4860 


BIOL 


4870/ 


GEOG 


4870/ 


ENGL 


4870/ 


HIST 


4870/ 


MATH 


4870 


SPED 


3800 



Practicum in Secondary School II 



Adolescents with Special Needs 
See the listing jor each Academic Department jor additional requirements jor 
each program. 



m 



Technology Education 

The Technology Education major requires the following 
core courses: 

Initial Licensure Common Technical Core 

(30 semester hours) 

Manufacturing Cluster 

FFEC 1200 Metal Fabrication Systems 

FFEC 1300 Wood Fabrication Systems 

rFEC 2 730 Automated Manufacturing I 

Communications Cluster 

FTEC 1400 Technical Drawing 

ITEC 1500 Graphic Arts Processes 

TFEC 2410 Computer Aided Drafting 

Construction Cluster 

FTEC 1320 Construction Systems I 

FFEC 2310 Construction Systems II 

FFEC 2400 Architectural Drawing 

Power/Energy/Transportation 

FFEC iooo Electric Systems and Circuits 

FFEC noo Electronics I 

ITEC 1600 Energy Systems II 

Professional Sequence (19 semester hours) 

TFEC 3800 Methods in Teaching Technology Education 

FFEC 3 810 Curriculum Development in Technology Education 

TFEC 4840 Prepracticum Seminar 

FFEC 4 860 Practicum in Technology Education 

Advanced Technical Elective Level 2000 or Higher (pick 

one): 

FFEC 3iio Digital Electronics 

rFEC 3 340 Construction Systems III 

ITEC 34io Drafting Commercial Structures 

FFEC 3 730 Automated Manufacturing II 

In addition all Tech Ed. majors need: 

ITEC 1710 Technical Analysis 



Theater 



Assistant Professor 

Cap Corduan 



Chairperson 

Janice Albergbene 

Professors 

Richard McElvain 
Kelly Morgan 

Objectives for the Program in Theater 

The Theater Program serves all students by offering courses 
that study the history and literature of theater as well as 
performing arts skills in acting, directing and stagecraft 
production. Opportunities to perform annual productions 
are also available. An interdisciplinary major or minor is also 
available. See minor in Theater. 



Major in English/Theater 

The courses required in the major are described under the 
English major. 

Major in Technical Theater 

The courses required for Technical Theater are described 
under the Industrial Technology major. 

The Minor in Theater 

The Theater Minor requires a minimum of 15 semester 
hours, including Introduction to Theater (THEA 2000), 
Directing the Play (THEA 4000), and at least 2 of the 
following courses: 
THEA l 700 Stage Movement or 

Stagecraft and Theater Production 

Art of Dance 

Acting I or 

Acting II 

Making Dances 
and at least one of the following courses: 
ENGL 3000 World Drama 

American Drama 

Modern Drama 

Shakespeare's Drama-. Text and Performance or 

Interpreting Shakespeare's Works 
Three hours of Theater internship may also count toward 
the minor. 



THEA 
PHED 
THEA 
THEA 
PHED 



ENGL 
ENGL 
ENGL 
ENGL 



2200 
4050 
2700 
2800 
4130 



3010 
3020 
4020 
4030 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Women's Studies 



Chairpersons Coordinators 

Margot Kempers Nancy Kelly 

Michael Turk Margot Kempers 

Janice Alberghene Susan Williams 

Objectives for the Women's Studies 
Program 

The program in Women's Studies provides multicultural and 
interdisciplinary courses which examine women's roles, 
history, and issues. These courses satisfy requirements in the 
Liberal Arts and Sciences Program and also can be counted 
toward an interdepartmental minor. 

Requirements for the Minor in Women's 
Studies 

The minor in Women's Studies includes the Introduction to 
Women's Studies and five other courses including 
independent study, selected from the following courses:* 

Required Course 

IDIS 1000 Introduction to Women's Studies 

Electives 

Choose five from the following: 

Women in Latin America 

Psychology oj Women 

Contemporary Issues in Women's Health 

History oj U.S. Women to 1870 

History oj U.S. Women jrom 1870 to the Present 

Women and Literature 

Women in European History since 1700 

Women, Art, and Society 

Women in American Society 

Women, Music and Society 

Independent Study in Women's Studies 
*Note : Each oj the electives jor this minor may have specijic prerequisites. 



IDIS 


iiOO 


PSY 


2250 


IDIS 


2340 


HIST 


2450 


HIST 


2500 


ENG 


3300 


HIST 


3450 


ART 


3700 


SOC 


3 770 


MUSC 


3900 


IDIS 


4903 






■ 



Undergraduate Evening Programs 




Administration 

Graduate and Continuing Education is administered by the 
Office of Academic Affairs. Degree specializations originate 
in the appropriate academic department of the college. 
Where there are no corresponding academic departments, 
committees perform the appropriate functions. CCE is 
responsible, in cooperation with the appropriate academic 
departments, for: 

• Maintaining the quality of degree programs 

• Scheduling courses 

• Advising students 

Faculty 

Courses offered through Graduate and Continuing 
Education are taught by Fitchburg State College faculty and 
other qualified individuals brought into the program as 
Adjunct Faculty. 



T 

JL he Office of Graduate and Continuing Education 
provides undergraduate degree programs in selected 
fields along with a variety of life -long learning 
opportunities and an array of liberal arts courses open 
to degree-seeking and non-degree students. With its 
commitment to affordable and accessible high-duality 
education, GCE offers its undergraduate courses on 
campus locations and via distance-education modes, 
including the Internet. Courses are offered at times, 
including summer and winter sessions, convenient to 
non-traditional and traditional-age students. 

Degree Majors, Minors, 
and Certificate Programs 

Bachelor's Degrees 

BS in Business Administration 
Accounting 
Finance 
Management 
Marketing 

BS in Computer Science 

BS in Computer Information Systems 

BA/BS in Interdisciplinary Studies 

BS in Occupational/Vocational Education 

Minors 

English 
Psychology 

Certificate Programs 

Applied Programming 

Business 

Computer Hardware 

Computer Use and Applications 

Database Systems 

High Level Languages 

Java Programming 

Microsoft Foundation Classes 

Office Administration 

Plastics Technology 

(Offered off-campus at NYPRO Inc. in Clinton only) 

Software Engineering 

Web Development 

Approval Programs 

Vocational Technical Teacher Approval Program 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



BS in Business Administration 



Program Manager 

James Noonan 



Chairperson 

Joseph McAloon 

Program Objectives 

Students who graduate from the Business Administration 
Program are equipped with a knowledge of business 
theories, policies, and procedures and are prepared to take a 
responsible position within the world of business. The 
program refines a student's commitment to personal values 
and moral excellence as well as professional competence. 

Program of Study 

The degree offered by the Business Administration 
Department is the Bachelor of Science degree. The 
curriculum is based in the Liberal Arts, coupled with a 
sufficient mix of professional courses and a variety of 
practical business experiences. 

BS in Business Administration Concentrations 

• Accounting 

• Finance (only offered at night) 

• Management 

• Marketing 

Liberal Arts and Sciences Requirements 

BSAD i 700 Introduction to Computer 

Information Systems for Business 3 S.H. 

Writing I 3 S.H. 

Writing II 3 S.H. 

Health and Fitness 3 S.H. 

Business Statistics 3 S.H. 

Calculus for Business 3 S.H. 

Principles of Economics I (Macro) 3 S.H. 

Principles oj Economics II (Micro) 3 S.H. 

Introduction to Speech Communications 3 S.H. 

Additional Liberal Arts and Sciences 

requirements 33 S.H. 

Subtotal oj Liberal Arts and Sciences 60 S.H. 
Core Curriculum 

For All Business Administration Concentrations: 

BSAD 2010 Introduction to Financial Reporting 3 S.H. 

Introduction to Managerial Accounting 3 S.H. 

Principles oj Management 3 S.H. 

Fundamentals oj Marketing 3 S.H. 

Basic Finance 3 S.H. 

Business Law I 3 S.H. 

Business Policy and Strategy 3 S.H. 

Subtotal Core Curriculum 21 S.H. 

Specializations for the Major 
in Business Administration 

Accounting 

Required Courses 

Financial Reporting Theory and Practice I 3 S.H. 

Financial Reporting Theory and Practice II 3 S.H. 

Cost Accounting I 3 S.H. 

Financial Reporting Theory and Practice III 3 S.H. 

International Accounting and Taxation 3 S.H. 

Individual Taxation 3 S.H. 

Auditing 3 S.H. 

Business Law II 3 S.H. 

Electives 15 S.H. 



ENGL 


1100 


ENGL 


1200 


PHED 


1000 


MATH 


1800 


MATH 


2200 


ECON 


1100 


ECON 


1200 


SPCH 


1000 



BSAD 


2020 


BSAD 


3200 


BSAD 


3300 


BSAD 


3400 


BSAD 


3500 


BSAD 


4890 



BSAD 


3010 


BSAD 


3020 


BSAD 


3120 


BSAD 


4010 


BSAD 


4110 


BSAD 


4120 


BSAD 


4140 


BSAD 


4 500 



Directed Advanced Elective 

Choose any one of the following: 
BSAD 4100 Consolidation and Mergers 
BSAD 4130 Corporate, Estate, and Gijt Taxation 
BSAD 4 160 Not-jor-Projit Accounting 

Finance 

Required Courses 

BSAD 3410 Investments 

BSAD 3460 Real Estate Investment and Management 
BSAD 4230 Business Fluctuations and Forecasting 
BSAD 4400 Financial Management oj Corporations 
BSAD 4500 Business Law II 
BSAD 4880 International Business Management 
BSAD 5000 Topics in Business 
ECON 2400 Money and Banking 
Electives 

Management 

Required Courses 

Human Resources Management 
Production Management 
Organizational Behavior and Theory 
Social and Political Environment oj Business 
Business Fluctuations and Forecasting 
International Business Management 
Electives 

Marketing 

Required Courses 

BSAD 3310 Consumer Behavior 

BSAD 3320 Market Research 

BSAD 3 3 30 Advertising 

BSAD 4880 International Business Management 

Choose any three of the following: 

BSAD 3 3 40 Small Business Management 

BSAD 3 3 50 Total Quality Management 

BSAD 4300 Sales Management 

BSAD 4310 Retail Marketing 

BSAD 4320 Industrial Marketing 

BSAD 4 330 International Marketing 

BSAD 4 340 Developing Marketing Strategies 

Electives 

Subtotal oj Major and Electives 



BSAD 


3210 


BSAD 


3220 


BSAD 


4200 


BSAD 


4210 


BSAD 


4230 


BSAD 


4880 



3 S.H. 


3 S.H. 


3 S.H 


3 S.H 


3 S.H 


3 S.H 


3 S.H. 


3 S.H 


3 S.H 


3 S.H. 


3 S.H. 


15 S.H. 


3 S.H 


3 S.H 


3 S.H. 


3 S.H 


3 S.H 


3 S.H 


21 S.H. 


3 S.H 


3 S.H 


3 S.H 


3 S.H 


3 S.H 


3 S.H 


3 S.H 


3 S.H 


3 S.H. 


3 S.H 


3 S.H 


is S.H 


39 S.H. 




BS in Computer Science 

Chairperson Program Manager 

Frits Lander Xuzhou (Brady) Chen 

Program Objectives 

The Computer Science program offers the opportunity for 
students to develop a unique blend of knowledge and skills 
in the areas of computer software and computer hardware. 
The program provides sufficient theoretical background for 
continued learning. It also provides practical skills to 
prepare the students for professional careers in the rapidly 
changing field of computer science. Students develop good 
communication skills and the ability for teamwork and 
leadership roles in their professional careers. 

Program of Study 



Liberal Arts 


ENGL 


1100 


ENGL 


1200 


PHED 


1000 


PHYS 


2300 


PHYS 


2400 


'MATH 


1300 


MATH 


1800 


MATH 


2300 


MATH 


2 400 


MATH 


2600 



Arts and Sciences Requirements 

Writing I 

Writing II 

Health & Fitness 

General Physics I 

General Physics II 

Precalculus 

Business Statistics 

Calculus I 

Calculus II 

Linear Algebra 

Additional Liberal Arts and 

Science Requirements 

Subtotal for Liberal Arts and Science 



3S.H. 

3 S.H. 

3 S.H. 

4 S.H. 
4 S.H. 

3 S.H. 
3S.H. 

4 S.H 
4 S.H 
3S.H. 

27 S.H. 
64 S.H. 

3 S.H 
3 S.H 

3 S.H 
3 S.H. 
3 S.H 
3 S.H. 
3 S.H 

3 S.H 

4 S.H 
4 S.H. 

4 S.H 
4 S.H. 

Five additional CS electives at or 

above 3000 level isS.H. 

Subtotal for Major 52 S.H. 

Free Electives from any area 4 S.H. 

Total for degree 1 20 S.H. 

+ Pending placement exam results 

* Course used to satisfy Junior/Senior Writing, and Speaking 
and Listening requirements. Computer Literacy requirement 
is satisfied by CS core. 



Required for Major 


CSC 


1500 


Computer Science I 


CSC 


1550 


Computer Science II 


CSC/ 






MATH 


1900 


Discrete Mathematics 


CSC 


2560 


Systems Programming 


CSC 


3100 


Operating Systems 


CSC 


3200 


Programming Languages 


CSC 


3 700 


Algorithms & Data Structures 


*csc 


4 400 


Software Engineering 


CSC 


1600 


Introduction to Electronics 


CSC 


1650 


Digital Electronics 


CSC 


2600 


Computer Organization 


CSC 


3600 


Microprocessors 



BS in Computer Information 
Systems 

Chairperson Program Manager 

Frits Lander Xuzhou (Brady) Chen 

Program Objectives 

The Computer Information Systems program offers the 
opportunity for students to develop knowledge and skills in 
analysis and design of business information systems, 
database development, software development, and 
networking. This program prepares the students for 
professional careers in the rapidly changing field of 
computer information systems. Students develop good 
communication skills and the ability for teamwork and 
leadership roles in their professional careers. 

All CIS majors are encouraged to register for a minor in 
Business Administration. 

Program of Study 

Liberal Arts and Sciences Requirements 



ENGL 


1100 


Writing I 


3 S.H. 


ENGL 


1200 


Writing II 


3 S.H. 


PHED 


1000 


Health & Fitness 


3 S.H 


CSC 


1000 


Introduction to Programming 


3 S.H 


CSC 


1400 


Computer Information Systems 


3 S.H 


CSC/ 








MATH 


1900 


Discrete Mathematics 


3 S.H 


ECON 


1100 


Macroeconomics 


3 S.H 


ECON 


1200 


Microeconomics 


3 S.H. 


'MATH 


1250 


Introduction to Functions 


3 S.H. 


MATH 


1800 


Business Statistics 


3 S.H. 


MATH 


2200 


Calculus for Business 
Additional Liberal Arts and 


3 S.H 






Science Requirements 


28 S.H 






Subtotal for Liberal Arts and Science 


6i S.H 


Required for 


Major 




BSAD 


2010 


Introduction to Financial Reporting 


3 S.H. 


BSAD 


2020 


Introduction to Managerial Accounting 


3 S.H 


BSAD 


3200 


Principles of Management 


3 S.H. 


BSAD 


3300 


Fundamentals of Marketing 


3 S.H. 


BSAD 


3400 


Basic Finance 


3 S.H. 



CSC/ 

BSAD 

CSC/ 

*BSAD 

CSC 

CSC 

CSC 

CSC 

CSC 

CSC 

CSC 



3710 Systems Analysis Methods 



4 700 Systems Design & Implementation 

1500 Computer Science I 

1550 Computer Science II 

2400 Database Systems 

2560 Systems Programming 

2700 Business Programming 

3400 Data Communications and Networking 

3450 Local Area Networks 

Three additional CS electives at or 
above 3000 level 
Subtotal for Major 
Free Electives from any area 
Total for degree 
* Course used to satisfy Junior/Senior Writing, and 
and Listening requirements. Computer Literacy req 
is satisfied by CS core. 

+ Pending Placement Exam results. 



3 S.H 

3 S.H 
3 S.H. 
3 S.H. 
3 S.H 
3 S.H 
3 S.H 
3 S.H 
3 S.H 

15 S.H. 

48 S.H. 

1 1 S.H. 
120 S.H. 

Speaking 
uirement 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



BA/BS in Interdisciplinary 
Studies 

Program Manager 

George Bohrer 

Program Objectives 

The Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Arts in 
Interdisciplinary Studies degrees provide for individually- 
designed, interdisciplinary majors, which allow students to 
work with faculty advisors to develop a plan of study that 
responds to individual educational and professional goals. 
The programs are particularly well -suited to adult learners, 
because they provide the opportunity for part-time, 
individually-paced education which allows students to build 
their academic confidence and integrate their studies into 
their lives. 

Admission Standards and Criteria 

There is a formal application procedure for students who 
choose to major in Interdisciplinary Studies. However, 
before the application is submitted to the Interdisciplinary 
Studies Coordinator, a student must have completed at least 
four semesters of college level work. The purpose of the 
application is to: 

• Set forth the student's academic and professional goals 
and demonstrate why they are best achieved through the 
Interdisciplinary Studies Program 

• Require students to outline their proposed program 

• Stipulate any required independent exercise or internship 

• Provide college-level courses and grades 

Breakdown of Requirements for Major 

• A minimum of 36 semester hours of course work for the 
major with a college-approved minor within one of the 
three fields 

• A minimum of 9 semester hours in each of the other two 
fields of study (defined by disciplines, not department or 
tracks) 

• A common core of three Liberal Arts and Sciences 
interdisciplinary courses: IDIS 1800, Global Issues,- 
MUSC 2000, Commonwealth of the Arts or MUSC 
2100, Commonwealth of the Ancient Arts,- and PHIL 

1 100, Logic or PHIL 2600, Philosophy of Human Nature 
or PHIL 3340 Contemporary Philosophy or PHIL 4430 
Marxism 

• A senior-year "Capstone" course intended to help students 
to integrate the various fields of study 

This may take the form of an independent study or an 
internship (3-15 semester hours) 

• A minimum 30 semester hours of course work completed 
after the program of study is approved and filed with the 
registrar 

A student's program must meet the approval of their 
Interdisciplinary Studies' advisor and advisors from each of 
the chosen fields of study. 



Program of Study 

The Interdisciplinary Studies degree is typically awarded as a 
Bachelor of Science. A Bachelor of Arts is awarded if the 
student includes foreign language study through the second 
year of college level work and concentrates his/her field of 
studies in the Liberal Arts and Sciences fields. 

There are many possible combinations of course work 
available through this major, limited only by the breadth of 
courses offered through the day and evening divisions of the 
college. When creating a plan of study, a student must have 
a rationale for a thematic approach to their program. 
Students must meet the following requirements for the 
major: 

Liberal Arts and Sciences Requirements 

LA&S Requirements (may go up to 63, 
depending upon whether science courses 
taken are 3 or 4 S.H.J 60S.H. 

Major Required Courses 

Major Courses including the required core 

(three or jour fields of study) 36 S.H. 

Capstone 

Capstone Course, Project, or 

Internship in Major 3- i 5 S.H. 

Electives 

Electives (may he fewer depending upon credits 
taken in above two categories.) 21 S.H. 

To tal for Degree 120 S.H. 

BS in Occupational/Vocational 
Education 



Chairperson 

James Alicata 



Program Manager 

James Alicata 



Program Objectives 

The college's undergraduate Occupational Education 
Degree program provides students with a blend of academic, 
vocational technical teaching, and elective learning 
opportunities. The program is committed to educating 
participants in comprehensive personnel development, 
which responds to specific occupational updating, 
professional growth and enhancement, and state-of-the-art 
information sharing for and with vocational technical 
educators. The program advocates a teaching approach, 
which brings about desired changes in the knowledge, skills, 
attitudes, and appreciation level of those in training. 

Program of Study 

The Occupational/Vocational Education degree is a 
Bachelor of Science Degree. A significant component of the 
program is the availability to students at off-campus 
vocational technical school sites located across 
Massachusetts. 

Job relevance and valid, reliable, vocational technical 
practice is attained through participatory planning and 
affiliation with industry, vocational technical school 
practitioners, professional associations, and representatives 
of the college. 

The program offers up to twelve credits in recognition of 
the work experiences of the participating students. 
Candidates may apply for the trade experience credit after 
completing eighty credits in the program. 




ENGL 


1200 


HIST 


1400 


HIST 


1500 


PHED 


1000 


PHIL 


1000 


PHIL 


2000 


PSY 


1100 


PSY 


2230 


SPCH 


1000 



Principal Sites where the Program is Offered 

North 

Greater Lowell Regional Vocational Technical High 
School 

Central 

Assabet Valley Regional Vocational High School 
Montachusett Regional Vocational Technical High 
School 

South 

Bristol-Plymouth Regional Vocational High School 
Diman Regional Vocational Technical High School 

General Education or Liberal Arts and Sciences 
Requirements 

CSC 1100 Computer Application Programming 3 S.H. 

ENGL iioo Writing I 3 S.H. 

Writing II 3 S.H. 

US History I or 3 S.H 

US History II 3 S.H 

Health and Fitness 3 S.H. 

Introduction to Western Philosophy 3 S.H. 

Philosophy oj Education 3 S.H. 

General Psychology 3 S.H. 

Adolescent Psychology 3 S.H. 

Introduction to Speech Communications 3 S.H. 

Additional Liberal Arts and 

Sciences Requirements 3 3 S.H. 

Subtotal 60 S.H. 

Vocational Education Requirements 

Teaching Methods: instructional Strategies 

in Vocational Technical Education 3 S.H. 

Teaching Methods: Educating 

the Vocational Technical Learner 3 S.H. 

Management of the Vocational Technical 

Education Environment 3 S.H. 

Students with Special Needs in 

Vocational Technical Education 3 S.H. 

Competency Based Vocational Technical 

Curriculum Development 3 S.H. 

Implementing a Competency Based 

Curriculum 3 S.H. 

Brain Compatibility-. Teaching and Learning 3 S.H. 

Fundamentals oj Vocational Technical 

Education 3 S.H. 

Computerized Vocational Technical 

Curriculum Management 3 S.H. 

Integrated Vocational Technical and 

Academic Curriculum 3 S.H. 

Assessment Standards and Evaluation 3 S.H. 

Supervised Practicum in Vocational 

Education 3 S.H. 

Requirements Subtotal 36 S.H. 

*Trade Experience 0-12 S.H. 

*Free Electives 0-24 S.H. 

Total for Degree 1 20 S. H. 

* A total oj 24 semester hours is required between trade experience andjree 
electives. 



Minor in English 



OCED 


2515 


OCED 


2516 


OCED 


2518 


OCED 


2523 


OCED 


2529 


OCED 


2539 


OCED 


2547 


OCED 


3517 


OCED 


3545 


OCED 


3546 


OCED 


3549 


OCED 


4534 



Chairperson 

Janice Alberghene 

Program Manager 

Margarite Roumas 

Program Objectives 

The minor in English allows students of other disciplines to 
add a concentration in literature to their plan of study. The 
minor provides a wide range of courses in literature that 
enhance a student's critical thinking and appreciation for the 
masters of the written word. 

Program of Study 

The Literature Concentration requires 18 semester hours of 
study. The following courses, offered in the evening and 
during summer sessions, satisfy the requirements as 
approved by the English Department: 

Six hours of survey selected from: 

ENGL 2000 American Literature jrom the Age 

oj Exploration to the Civil War 3 S.H. 

American Literature jrom the Civil War 

to the Present 3 S.H. 

English Literature jrom Beowulj to Milton 3 S.H. 

English Literature jrom Pepys to Shelley 3 S.H. 

English Literature jrom Bronte to Rushdie 3 S.H. 

World Literature I 3 S.H. 

World Literature II 3 S.H. 

Nine additional hours in literature electives selected from 
the remainder of the above and/or the following (six must 
be at the 3000 level or above): 

ENGL 2300 Literature and Disability 3 S.H. 

Literature and Film 3 S.H. 

Classical Mythology 3 S.H. 

The Short Story 3 S.H. 

Detective Fiction 3 S.H. 

Children's Literature 3 S.H. 

Literature jor Young Adults 3 S.H. 

Modern Drama 3 S.H. 

20th Century Irish Literature or 3 S.H. 

Major American Authors oj 20th Century 3 S.H. 

American Novel to 1950 3 S.H. 

The Age oj Dickens 3 S.H. 

20th Century Irish Literature or 3 S.H. 

Modern Poetry 3 S.H. 

Other English electives as approved by the 

English Department 

Total for English Minor 



ENGL 

ENGL 
ENGL 
ENGL 
ENGL 
ENGL 



ENGL 
ENGL 
ENGL 
ENGL 
ENGL 
ENGL 
ENGL 
ENGL 
ENGL 
ENGL 
ENGL 
ENGL 
ENGL 



2100 

2200 
2210 
2220 
2400 
2500 



2330 
2620 
2700 
2750 
2900 
2910 
3020 
3050 
3210 
3220 
4095 
3050 
4140 



18 S.H. 



Minor in Psychology 



Chairperson 

Margot Kempers 

Program Objective 

The minor in Psychology is particularly useful for students 
who wish to complement their chosen major with 
psychology courses relevant to their area of study, as well as 
for students who wish to gain a general knowledge of 
Psychology for application to their own lives. 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Program of Study 

The minor is designed to enable the student: 

• To understand and evaluate psychological research and 
literature 

• To choose courses which complement and relate to the 
major 

field of study 

• To explore a particular interest in Psychology in depth 
Accordingly, the following course organization is required: 

Group I 

Two courses are required: 

PSY 1100 General Psychology 

(prerequisite not counted towards minor) 
PSY 2 no Introduction to Research Methods 

Group II 

At least one course is to be taken from each of any three of 
the four areas (Adaptive, Applied Studies, Basic Processes, 
and Developmental) described under the psychology major 
described in the section titled "Undergraduate Day 
Programs." 

The remaining required courses may be selected from either 
the integrative courses (Group III) or any one of the above 
mentioned areas. Courses may also include: 
PSY 2200 Human Growth and Development 
PSY 2 750 Tests and Measurements 

Total for Psychology Minor 1 8 S.H. 

Certificate Programs in 
Business 

Program Manager 

James Noonan 

Certificate in Business 

The Certificate in Business allows students with or without a 
college degree to learn the fundamentals of Business 
Administration. The credit earned for the certificate can be 
applied to an undergraduate degree in Business or can serve 
as prerequisites for an MBA or Management Science 
Program. 

lents 

Introduction to Financial Reporting 3 S.H. 

Introduction to Managerial Accounting 3 S.H. 

Principles oj Management 3 S.H. 

Fundamentals oj Marketing 3 S.H. 

Basic Finance 3 S.H. 

Business Law I 3 S.H. 

Total for Certificate 1 8 S.H. 

• At least three of the six courses must be completed at 
Fitchburg State College, including the last two courses 

• Students must maintain a cumulative Grade Point Average 
of 2.0 or better 



Requirements 


BSAD 


2010 


BSAD 


2020 


BSAD 


3200 


BSAD 


3300 


BSAD 


3400 


BSAD 


3 500 



Office Administration Certificate 

There are two phases of course work to attain the 
Certificate of Office Administration. Phase I can be 
completed independently of Phase II, but Phase II requires 
completion of Phase I. 



Phase 1 






Requirements 






CSC 


1050 


Internet Communications 


3 S.H. 


CSC 


f 100 


Computer Applications Programming I 


3 S.H. 


CSC 


1200 


Introduction to Microsoft Windows 








and Word Processing 


3 S.H. 


BSAD 


3200 


Principles oj Management 


3 S.H 


BSAD 


2010 


Introduction to Financial Reporting 


3 S.H 


ENGL 


1100 


Writing I 


3 S.H. 






Subtotal Phase I 


is S.H 


Phase II 






Requirements 






CSC 


1300 


Introduction to Spreadsheets and Databases 3 S.H. 


BSAD 


2020 


Introduction to Managerial Accounting 


3 S.H. 


BSAD 


3210 


Human Resources Management 


3 S.H. 


BSAD 


3500 


Business Law I 


3 S.H 






Subtotal Phase II 


12 S.H. 






Total for Certificate 


30 S.H. 



• At least eight of the ten courses must be completed at 
Fitchburg State College, including the last two courses 

• Students must maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or better 

Certificate Programs in 
Computer Science 

Program Manager 

Nadimpalli Mabadev 

The certificate programs in Computer Science are designed 
for those who work with computers at their workplace and 
wish to sharpen their skills in specific areas. All the courses 
are part of the undergraduate curriculum. In order to earn a 
certificate, a minimum grade point average of 3.0 must be 
maintained within the program. At least 50% of the courses 
must be completed at Fitchburg State College. The 
department must approve all other courses. 

Computer Use and Applications Certificate 

This certificate provides basic computer literacy skills in the 
usage of Internet, e-mail and a popular operating system. In 
addition, word processing, spreadsheets, databases and 
presentation graphics are studied in detail. 
CSC 1050 Internet Communications 3 S.H. 

CSC HOO Computer Applications 3 S.H. 

CSC 1300 Intro, to Spreadsheets and Databases 3 S.H. 

Total for Certificate 9 S.H. 




Web Development Certificate 

The Internet plays a crucial role in the information 
revolution. It is used increasingly for personal and business 
communications, for commerce and exchange of ideas, and 
as a source of information and entertainment. This 
certificate provides the knowledge and skills needed to 
make the best use of what Internet can offer and to create 
professional quality web pages. 

CSC 1050 Internet Communications 3 S.H. 

CSC i i 50 Basics oj Web Design 3 S.H. 

CSC 2150 Advanced Web Design with Scripting 3 S.H. 

CSC 3250 Advanced Topics in Web Development 3 S.H. 

Total for Certifies re 12 S. H. 

Applied Programming Certificate 

This certificate introduces the programming languages that 
are used to program small and large businesses applications. 



CSC 


1000 


CSC 


1500 


CSC 


1550 


CSC 


2 700 



Intro, to Programming 
Computer Science I 
Computer Science II 
Business Programming 
Total for Certificate 



3 S.H. 
3 S.H 
3 S.H 
3 S.H 
12 S.H. 



High Level Languages Certificate 

This certificate introduces the high level programming 
languages, at the assembler level, at the structured 
programming level and at the object-oriented programming 
level. 

Computer Science I 3 S.H. 

Computer Science II 3 S.H. 



CSC 


1500 


CSC 


1550 


CSC/ 




MATH 


1900 


CSC 


2560 


CSC 


3500 



Discrete Mathematics 3 S.H. 

Systems Programming 3 S.H. 

Object Oriented Programming 3 S.H. 

Total for Certificate 15 S.H. 

Java Programming Certificate 

Java is a very elegant and popular object oriented 
programming language. In addition, it is platform 
independent and simplifies programming for the Internet, 
distributed networking, database access, embedded systems 
and client/server computing. This certificate provides for 
building programming skills from very basic to advanced 
web programming with Java. 

CSC 1500 Computer Science I 3 S.H. 

CSC 1550 Computer Science II 3 S.H. 

CSC/ 

MATH i 900 Discrete Mathematics 3 S.H. 

CSC 2560 Systems Programming 3 S.H. 

CSC 3050 Web Programming with Java 3 S.H. 

Total for Certificate 15 S.H. 

Microsoft Foundation Classes Certificate 

Microsoft Foundation Classes (MFC) provides the 
Application Programming Interface (API) for creating 
applications for Win32 platforms. This certificate provides 
the knowledge and skills needed for creating Windows 
applications. 



CSC 

CSC 

CSC/ 

MATH 

CSC 

CSC 

CSC 



1 500 Computer Science I 3 S.H. 

1550 Computer Science II 3 S.H. 

1900 Discrete Mathematics 3 S.H. 

2560 Systems Programming 3 S.H. 

3500 Object Oriented Programming 3 S.H. 

3550 Windows Programming with MFC 3 S.H. 

Total for Certificate 1 8 S.H. 

Database Systems Certificate 

Database systems have evolved for managing large-scale 
information securely and efficiently. This certificate 
provides in-depth knowledge of how databases work, where 
they are used and how to program databases for information 
storage and retrieval. 
CSC 1000 Intro, to GUI Programming 
CSC 1 400 Computer Information Systems 
CSC/ 

MATH 1 900 Discrete Mathematics 
CSC 2400 Database Systems 
CSC 4550 Database Programming 
Total for Certificate 

Computer Hardware Certificate 

This certificate provides the theoretical background in 
computer hardware needed for more advanced topics such 
as Data Communications, Digital Signal Processing and 
Embedded Systems. 

MATH 1300 Precalculus 3 S.H. 

CSC 1600 Intro, to Electronics 4 S.H. 

CSC 1650 Digital Electronics 4 S.H. 

CSC 2500 Assembly Language 3 S.H. 

CSC 2600 Computer Organization 4 S.H. 

CSC 3600 Microprocessors 4 S.H. 

Total for Certificate 22 S.H. 

Software Engineering Certificate 

Software Engineering is one of the fastest growing 
professions as we move from the Industrial Revolution to the 
era of Information Technology Revolution. The graduates of 
this certificate not only acquire good programming skills, 
but also understand the life cycle of a software product and 
how to design software for efficiency, maintenance and 
upgrades. 



3 S.H. 


3 S.H. 


3 S.H. 


3 S.H 


3 S.H 


5 S.H 



Note: Completion of this certificate also allows awarding 


of the High Level 


Languages Certificate. 




CSC 


1500 


Computer Science I 


3 S.H 


CSC 


1550 


Computer Science II 


3 S.H 


CSC/ 








MATH 


1900 


Discrete Mathematics 


3 S.H 


CSC 


2560 


Systems Programming 


3 S.H 


CSC 


3500 


Object Oriented Programming 


3 S.H 


CSC 


3700 


Algorithms and Data Structures 


3 S.H 


CSC 


4 400 


Software Design 


3 S.H 






Total for Certificate 


21 S.H 



Note: Completion of this certificate also allows awarding of the High Level 
Languages Certificate. 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Certificate Program in 
Plastics Technology 

Program Manager 

Steven Therrien 

In cooperation with NYPRO, Inc., the college offers a 
certificate program in Plastics Technology. Located in 
Clinton, MA, NYPRO is a world-class leader in injection 
molding. The program is open both to NYPRO employees 
and to any other student desiring to learn about injection 
molding and the manufacturing process involving 
conversion of raw material into finished parts and products. 
Course instructors, approved by Fitchburg State College, 
have extensive backgrounds in the plastics industry. 

Requirements 

Many of the courses include a laboratory component 
wherein students utilize injection molding machines. These 
activities are designed to enhance the learning experience. 

The courses are held in the evenings each fall and spring 
semester in the modern classroom facilities of the NYPRO 
Institute in Clinton, MA. Students must maintain a 
cumulative GPA of 2.0 in order to earn the certificate 

Required Courses 

PLAS 1010 Blueprint Reading 

Industrial Electrical Maintenance 

Mold Design 

Hydraulics/Pneumatics 

Injection Molding 

Principles oj Supervision 

Polymeric Materials, Design 

and Application 

Statistical Process Control 

Total for Certificate 



Approval Programs 



PLAS 


1030 


PLAS 


2020 


PLAS 


2040 


PLAS 


2050 


PLAS 


2070 


PLAS 


3060 



PLAS 



3080 



Program Manager 

James Alicata 

Vocational Technical Teacher Approval 
Program 

The Vocational Technical Teacher Approval Program of 
study is currently being revised to meet the new 
Massachusetts Department of Eduction regulations for 
individuals seeking approval as a vocational technical 
teacher. The new regulations are expected to become 
effective September 1, 2004. For details, contact the 
program chair, Dr. James Alicata at 978-665-3047. 

Candidates seeking credentials as approved vocational 
technical instructors must successfully complete a thirty-six 
semester hour competency based training program. This 
training program provides the candidate with the 
curriculum, organizational and delivery skills, along with 
the methodological and pedagogical competencies needed 
to become an effective vocational technical instructor or 
pursue a baccalaureate program. 



Teaching Methods-. Instructional Strategies 

in Vocational Technical Education 

Teaching Methods: Educating the Vocational 

Technical Learner 

Management of Vocational Technical 

Education Environment 

Students with Special Needs in Vocational 

Technical Education 

Competency Based Vocational Technical 

Curriculum Development 

Implementing a Competency Based 

Curriculum 

Brain Compatibility: Teaching and Learning 

Supervised Practicum in 

Vocational Education 

Subtotal Part I 

Fundamentals oj Vocational Technical 

Education 

Computerized Vocational Technical 

Curriculum Management 

Integrated Vocational Technical and 

Academic Curriculum 

Assessment Standards and Evaluation 

Subtotal Part II 

Total for Program 





Parti 




e. 


OCED 


2515 


3 S.H 


OCED 


2516 


3 S.H 






3 S.H 


OCED 


2518 


3SH. 






3 S.H. 


OCED 


2523 


3 S.H 








OCED 


2529 


3 S.H. 






3 S.H. 


OCED 


2539 


24 S.H. 








OCED 


2547 




OCED 


4534 



Part II 

OCED 
OCED 
OCED 
OCED 



3517 



3545 



3546 



3549 



3 S.H. 

i 


iU 

3 S.H. 


3 S.H 


3 S.H 


3 S.H. 


3 S.H. 


3 S.H 


3 S.H. 


2 4 S.H 


3 S.H 


3 S.H 


3 S.H 


3 S.H 


12 S.H. 


36 S.H 




Undergraduate Course Description 




Art 



African-American Studies 

introduction to African-American Studies 

AAST 1000 3 cr. 3 hr. 

This introductory course defines the origins and scope of African- 
American studies. It provides a survey of the social, economic, 
religious, and cultural expressions of African-Americans as they 
followed the tangled path from Africa through slavery, emancipation 
into the 20th century. 1, L, C, IDIS 

African-American History 

(See HIST 2300) I, C ▲ 

Modem African History 

(See HIST 2930) I, C ▲ 

History of African-American Women 

(See HIST 2520) I, L, C, IDIS ▲ 

20th Century African-American Literature 

(See ENGL 2670) L, C ▲ 

Other Voices 

(See ENGL 2650) L, C ▲ 

Peoples and Cultures of Africa 

(See SOC 2510) B, C A 

History of Jazz 

(See MUSC 3800) L, C A 

African Jazz Dance 

(See PHED 1310) I, L, C, IDIS A 

Independent Study in African-American Studies 

AAST 4901-4903 1-3 cr. A 

Directed Studies in African-American Studies 

AAST 4975 A 



Art Appreciation 

ART 1100 3cr.3hr. A* 

The course presents a condensed survey of art history from 
prehistoric art to the present emphasizing the historical relationship 
of style and content. The Greek, Roman, Renaissance, Impressionist, 
and Modern art periods are emphasized. L, C 

Survey of Art Forms I 

ART 1150 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

A study of architecture, sculpture, and painting from ancient 
Egyptian times to the Renaissance in Europe. Asian and other non- 
western or ethnographic cultures may be included. Emphasis is 
placed on understanding style in these various art forms. L, C 

Survey of Art Forms II 

ART 1160 3cr.3hr. A 

This survey of significant styles in the architecture and painting of 
the Western World depicts art from the year 1 400 to the present 
with emphasis upon the special nature of the visual experience. L, C 

Introduction to Studio Art: Drawing, Painting, and Sculpture 

ART 1300 3 cr. 3 hr. 

This course provides a hands-on introduction to drawing, painting, 
and sculpture The course will emphasize the fundamentals of each 
studio discipline, but will also explore the expressive potential of 
visual art: how the various elements of drawing, painting, and 
sculpture can be used to embody very different feelings and ideas. 

Drawing 

ART 1400 3 cr. 6 hr. A • 

A studio course that introduces students to the practice of drawing 
with emphasis on the description of form through means of line, 
shade, and perspective. An investigation of a variety of media as well 
as of basic stylistic alternatives is encouraged L, C 

Introductory Painting 

ART 1450 3cr.6hr. A 

The course studies the basic problems of form, color, and texture as 
understood in oil or acrylic painting. Consideration is also given to 
the nature and use of the oil painting materials themselves. L 

Design 

ART 1600 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

In this course the basic elements and principles of design are 
analyzed and applied to the creation of two-dimensional form. 
Topics covered include the effect of black and white, color, mixed 
media, scale, and texture on form. Lectures, slides, film, and visual 
presentations are included in the course program. L 

Three-Dimensional Design 

ART 1650 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course explores three-dimensional design concepts as they have 
been applied historically. Topics covered include form, space, 
structure, scale, line, and color. Lectures, slides, film, and visual 
presentations are included in the course program. L 

Contemporary Art 

ART 1720 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course presents a study of recent and contemporary trends in 
American and international art from 1945 to the present. The course 
consists of active student participation in slide discussions and 
museum trips. L, C 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Sculpture I 

ART 1840 3cr.6hr. A 

This introductory studio course encourages students to explore their 
ideas and to transform them into sculpture. Students combine 
creativity, exciting materials, and basic sculpture techniques to create 
unique works of art. L 

Life Drawing 

ART 2200 3cr.6hr. A 

The basic problems in form and anatomy are studied while drawing 
from the nude and costumed model. Various techniques and tools are 
explored, including a study of some of the great masters' drawings. L 

Intermediate Drawing 

ART 2250 3 cr. 6 hr. ▲ • 

The course is an advanced study of pictorial technique in dry media, 

including but not limited to charcoal, pencil, conte, and pastel. 

Emphasis is placed on the developing of a students own style through 

a variety of subjects and media. L 

Prerequisite: ART 1400 or permission of instructor. 

American Art 

ART 2300 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course is a survey of significant stylistic developments in visual 
arts from the earliest colonial times to the present. L 

Sculpture II 

'ART 2400 3cr.6hr. A 

This advanced studio course is an expansion upon the basic 

principles of sculpture. Sculpture projects are geared toward the 

individual interests and requirements of the advanced student. L 

Prerequisite: ART 1840 or permission of instructor. 

Water-Based Media 

ART 2450 3 cr. 4 hr. ▲ • 

The course introduces students to painting with water-based media. 
Throughout the course, the focus will be on developing command of 
the medium of transparent watercolor, although painting with acrylics 
will also be introduced. While a prior course in drawing would be 
helpful, it is not required. L 

Art of the Renaissance 

ART 2550 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

The course studies the development of painting, sculpture, and 
architecture in Italy from 1250 to 1550, the age of Michelangelo, and 
the Northern Europe Renaissance from 1 400 to 1 600. L 

Intermediate Painting 

* ART 2600 3cr.6hr. A 

The course provides an advanced study of pictorial techniques with 

an emphasis on personal expression in oil, acrylic, or water based 

media. The class may be repeated for credit. L 

Prerequisite: ART 1450, 2450 or permission of instructor. 

Nineteenth Century Art 

ART 2900 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This survey is comprised of art from French Neo-Classicism 
through Post-Impressionism, including the movements of 
Romanticism, Realism, and Impressionism. Emphasis is placed on 
French, British, and German art, with pertinent comparisons to 
American, Japanese, African, and ethnographic art. Students study 
women and minority artists including Berthe Morisot, Mary 
Cassatt, Rosa Bonheur, Suzanne Valadon, Henry Osawa Tanner, and 
others. L 

Art Criticism 

ART 3100 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course is a study of the development of modern art criticism. 
The course begins by examining traditional art criticism as established 
by Panofsky, Woefflin, and others. It then concentrates on contem- 
porary art and criticism, commencing with Clement Creenberg in the 
1940s and concluding with Postmodern criticism of the 1980s and 
1990s. L, IDIS 

Prerequisite: one Art History course or Music 2000. 



Early Twentieth Century Art 

ART 3150 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course is a survey of multicultural art from 1 890 to 1 945 in 
Europe and the United States. Periods covered include French Post 
Impressionism, Fauvism, and Cubism,- German Expressionism,- Spanish 
and French Surrealism, Early American Modernism, the Harlem 
Renaissance, and Regionalism Students study women and minority 
artists including Suzanne Valadon, Kathe Kollwitz, Gabriel Munter, 
Frida Kahlo, Emily Carr, Georgia O'Keefe, Henry Ossawa Tanner, 
Jacob Lawrence, Romare Bearden, Horace Pippin, Bob Thompson, 
Diego Rivera, and others. L, C 

History of Architecture 

ART 3300 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course presents a condensed survey of architectural history 
from ancient art to the present. Periods studied include Greek, 
Roman, Romanesque, Gothic, Renaissance, and Baroque 
architecture. Non-Western architecture includes the culture of 
Japan, India, and Islam. I, L, IDIS, C 

History of Modern Architecture 

ART 3500 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

A study of architecture with a concentration upon the nineteenth 
and twentieth centuries. Periods begin with early American 
architecture and continue through the various revivals of the 
nineteenth century, include Art Nouveau and the Chicago School, 
and conclude with the modern skyscrapers and post-modern 
architecture. L, IDIS 

Women, Art, and Society 

ART 3700 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

This course introduces the student to the place and roles of women 
in the world of visual and fine arts from the middle ages to the 
present. L, C 

Independent Study in Art 

ART 4901-4903 1 -3 cr. 13 hr. A • 

The independent study is for selected students who have approval 
of both the department head and their advising Instructor. 

Museum Internship 

* ART 4950 3cr.6hr. A 

In conjunction with Fitchburg State College, the Fitchburg Art 
Museum offers a multifaceted learning experience coupled with 
practical application conducted in the Fitchburg Art Museum and in 
elementary school classrooms of Fitchburg and surrounding towns. 
Student Instructors are trained to give instructional lectures about the 
ancient cultures of Egypt, Mesopotamia, and Mesa Verde, to school 
children both in the Museum galleries and in the classroom. 

Directed Study 

ART 4975 1-6 cr. A • 



Key to Course Offerings 

Q: designates courses in the 
Quantitative Scientific Cluster 

I: the Ideas and Events Ouster 

B: the Human Behavior Cluster 

L: the Literature, Language 
and Arts Cluster 

C: Multicultural 

IDIS: Interdisciplinary courses 

Multicultural and interdisciplinary counts also 

fulfill a cluster designation. 

* Asterisk indicates that the course may 
be offered less than once every two years. 

▲ Undergraduate Day School 

• Undergraduate Evening School 

Courses having a more narrow focus than 
those taught on a regular basis or courses 
being taught on an experimental basis can 
be taught as Topics" courses. These courses 
will be assigned numbers based on the 
student level for which they are intended — 
first, second, third or fourth year. 




Biology 



Introduction to Life Science I 

BIOL 1000 3 cr. 4 hr. ▲ • 

Offered in the fall semester for day students. 
The course focuses on the history, philosophy, and content of 
biology as a science. Laboratory work includes experiences that 
emphasize problem solving by the student. Q 

Introduction to Life Science II 

BIOL 1100 3 cr. 4hr. A • 

Offered in the spring semester for day students. 

Continuation of BIOL 1000. Q 
Anatomy and Physiology I 

BIOL 1200 4cr.5hr. ▲• 

Offered in the fall semester for day students. 
The course explores the structure and function of the human 
organism on the cellular, tissue, organ, and system levels. Cellular 
metabolism, histology, and the following systems: skeletal, muscular, 
and nervous (including the special senses) are examined The 
laboratory emphasizes both physiology and the dissection of 
preserved mammalian specimens. (Not open to students who have 
completed BIOL 1700, Human Biology or BIOL 2420, Human 
Physiology.) Q 

Anatomy and Physiology II 

BIOL 1300 4cr.5hr. ▲• 

Offered in the spring semester for day students. 

This course is a continuation of BIOL 1 200. The following systems 

are covered: circulatory, respiratory, digestive, excretory, endocrine, 

and reproductive. 

(Not open to students who have completed BIOL 1700, Human 

Biology or BIOL 2420, Human Physiology.) Q 

Prerequisite: BIOL 1200 or permission of Instructor. 

Adaptations 

BIOL 1350 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The human organism is examined in terms of its adaptation to acute 
and chronic stress. Physiological responses to such stressors as 
exercise, heat, darkness, altitude, and nutrition are studied 
theoretically and in a laboratory setting Q, IDIS 

General Botany 

'BIOL 1400 3 cr. 4 hr. A • 

The course focuses on the biology of bryophytes, ferns, 
gymnosperms, and angiosperms. The relationship of plant biology to 
agriculture and medicine is also discussed. The laboratory involves 
the study of live and preserved plant materials, simple physiological 
experiments, and a plant growth project. The class is not open for 
majors or minors in Biology. Q 

Seminar in Modern Biology 

*B10L 1500 lcr.lhr. A 

The seminar evolves around the discussion of current topics in basic 
and applied biological research based on readings of original scientific 
reports. Each student is expected to prepare one brief presentation on 
a topic of his or her choice. 

Nutrition 

BIOL 1650 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

The course involves an examination of nutrients in foods and their 
metabolic role in normal nutrition Emphasis is on energy sources and 
utilization, vitamins and minerals, nutritional requirements in relation 
to the changing demands of life, and the effect of food handling and 
processing on the nutrient content of food Course material is 
facilitated by lectures, discussions, and personal nutrition projects. Q 

Human Biology 

BIOL 1700 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

Students learn the anatomy and physiology of the cells, tissues, 
organs, and organ systems of the human organism as well as their 
functional inter-relationships. (The class is not open to students who 
have completed BIOL 1200, 1 300.) Unless permission of instructor is 
granted Q 



General Biology I 

BIOL 1800 4cr.6hr. ▲• 

The course examines principles of molecular, cellular, and organismal 
biology. Topics include biomolecules, cell structure and function, and 
information processing and inheritance. The laboratory emphasizes 
the scientific method through experimentation Q 

General Biology II 

BIOL 1900 4cr.6hr. ▲• 

The class is a continuation of BIOL 1800 The course examines 
principles of organismal, population and community biology. Topics 
include comparative anatomy and physiology, evolution and ecology. 
The laboratory emphasizes hypothesis formation and testing as well 
as data gathering and analysis. Q 

Biology of Drugs 

BIOL 2000 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

A study of the biological effects of drugs at the cellular level. 

Emphasis is placed on the more popular psychoactive drugs. 

Prerequisite: one year of Biology, Chemistry, or permission of Instructor. 

Flora of New England 

BIOL 2100 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course is an introduction to the vegetation of New England 
The emphasis of this course is to become familiar with the flora and 
the factors that influence the different ecological associations found 
in New England. Laboratory is devoted to the techniques of plant 
identification with emphasis on the terminology and use of botanical 
keys. Field trips are taken for collecting representative elements of the 
local flora and preparation of a herbarium. Q 

Introductory Ecology 

BIOL 2300 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

Offered in the fall semester for day students. 

The course is a survey of major ecological concepts and 

methodology as a basis for further investigations of the dynamic 

relationship between organisms and their environment. Field and 

laboratory work emphasize problem identification, formulation of 

hypotheses, data collection, and analysis and interpretation of results 

in terms of their biological implications. 

Prerequisite: BIOL 1000, or 1100, or 1800, or 1900 or permission of 

Instructor. 

Environmental Health 

*BIOL 2400 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

Students conduct investigations into public health with emphasis on 
forms of life, chemical substances, environmental conditions, and 
other environmental forces that exert an influence on human health 
and well-being. 

Prerequisite: BIOL 1100 or equivalent or permission of Instructor. 

Human Physiology 

BIOL 2420 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course is an intensive study of the functional operation of 

human organ systems and the interrelationships of these systems 

(Intended for students who are majoring in Biology or Clinical Lab 

Science.) Q 
Prerequisite: Not open to students who have taken BIOL 1200/1300 unless 

permission of Instructor is granted. 

Histology 

'BIOL 2500 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

The course starts with a systematic survey of basic animal cell and 

tissue types, followed by in-depth microscopic study of the major 

organ systems. Practical work includes histological microtechnique on 

normal and pathological specimens. 

Prerequisites: BIOL 1800 or BIOL 2420 or BIOL 1200, 1300 
or permission of Instructor 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Animal Behavior 

'BIOL 2600 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

This course focuses on classical and current research exploring the 
mechanisms and evolution of Animal Behavior. Course topics include 
the genetic, ecological, evolutionary, cellular and physiological 
processes that shape animal behavior. Particular emphasis is placed on 
reviewing primary literature to understand the evolution of adaptive 
behaviors for communication, predator avoidance, foraging, habitat 
selection, courtship, mating, parental care, kin recognition, and 
cooperations Weekly laboratory session will provide students with 
the opportunity to conduct independent experiments on animal 
behavior using a variety of model systems. 

Survey of Micro-organisms 

BIOL 2700 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

Offered in the spring semester for day students 
3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab per week plus some additional time. 

The course serves as an introduction to the biology of major groups 
of micro-organisms including bacteria, viruses, protozoa, and fungi. 
Emphasis is placed on their role in nature and their relationship to 
man as agents of infectious diseases. In the laboratory principles and 
practices of aseptic techniques and diagnostic identification and 
culture of disease entities are explored. 

Prerequisites: BIOL 1300 and CHEM 1200 or permission of Instructor. 

Genetics 

BIOL 2800 4 cr. 6 hr. A • 

Offered in the spring semester for day students. 

Basic principles of biological information processing are examined 

including Mendelian inheritance, sex determination, chromosome 

cytogenetics, linkage, recombination and genetic mapping, 

mutagenesis, molecular genetics and gene-enzyme relationships, and 

quantitative inheritance. Laboratory work includes study of 

mutational effects and recombinational analysis in Drosophila, bacteria, 

and viruses. 

Prerequisite: 3 semester hours of Introductory Biology or equivalent. 

Introduction to Secondary Teaching 

BIOL 2860 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course is required of all students preparing for initial license at 
the secondary level. It is a sophomore level course for full-time 
undergraduates and the first course taken by transfer students. It is 
taught at the local high school and is a clinical laboratory experience. 
This course includes a 25 hour pre-practicum requirement and is a 
prerequisite for other certification course requirements. Students 
become familiar with the complexities of secondary school teaching 
and its demands. The course gives faculty the opportunity to screen 
students and gives students the opportunity to test their commitment 
to teaching. 

Marine Biology 

* BIOL 2900 3cr.4hr. A 

Offered in the fall semester for day students. 
In this course students investigate the distribution of the dominant 
animals and plants in a salt marsh, sand beach, tide pool, and rocky 
intertidal area. Data on physical and chemical factors of these habitats 
is correlated with the composition, behavior, and physiology of the 
flora and fauna of each habitat. 

Prerequisites: BIOL 1800, 1900 or permission of Instructor. 

Parasitology 

'BIOL 3000 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

The morphology and diagnostic identification of representative 
groups of parasitic protozoa, helminths, and arthropods are studied 
along with their functional life cycles and pathogenic relationships to 
animal and human hosts. Emphasis is placed on epidemiology, 
pathology, control, and treatment of important parasitic diseases. 

Prerequisite: BIOL 1900. 



Plant Physiology 

•BIOL 3200 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

Offered in the fall semester for day students. 
Individually paced instruction is offered to study the integration of 
plant structure and function, emphasizing physiology of the 
integrated plant-water relations, transpiration and translocation, 
mineral nutrition, photosynthesis, respiration, growth hormones, 
differentiation, and morphogenesis. 

Prerequisite: BIOL 1900 or BIOL 1400. 

Cell Biology 

BIOL 3250 4cr.6hr. A 

Offered in the fall semester for day students. 
Cell and subcellular structure and function are covered in this 
course. Membranes, cell organelles, bioenergetics, photosynthesis, 
DNA and RNA structure, function and replication, protein 
synthesis, and gene regulation are the major areas considered. 
Laboratory includes absorption spectrophotometry, cell 
fractionation, organelle isolation, DNA isolation, and 
electrophoresis. 

Prerequisites: BIOL 2800 and CHEM 2100 or permission of Instructor. 

Entomology 

*BI0L 3300 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

Offered in the fall semester for day students. 
Students learn anatomy, habits, life histories, and identification of 
insects and some related arthropods. Laboratory work includes 
preparation of a representative collection of adult and larval forms 
from terrestrial and aquatic environments with emphasis on 
techniques for identification of these forms. 

Prerequisite: BIOL 1900 or permission of Instructor. 

Limnology 

*BI0L 3400 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

Offered in the fall semester for day students. 

The course offers a study of fresh waters and their inhabitants. Class 

work surveys protists, invertebrates, vertebrates, and plants collected 

from local waters and emphasizes their ecological interrelationships as 

determined by biological, physical, and chemical parameters. 

Prerequisites: BIOL 1900 and BIOL 2300 or permission of Instructor. 

Biochemistry 

BIOL 3450 4 cr. 6 hr. A 

Offeredin the fall semester for day students. 

The course is a study of the chemistry of biologically important 

molecules and macromolecules, including metabolism and regulation, 

water, proteins, enzymes, lipids, carbohydrates, and nucleic acids. 

Laboratory emphasizes manual and instrumented techniques for 

isolation, qualitative and quantitative analysis of macromolecules, and 

the kinetics and induction of enzymes. 

Prerequisite: BIOL 2800, CHEM 2100 or permission of Instructor. 

Plant Taxonomy 

* BIOL 3500 3cr.5hr. A 

Offered 
The course examines the classification 
with evolutionary principles and 
trends. Laboratory is devoted to the 
techniques of plant identification 
with emphasis on the terminology 
and use of botanical keys. Field trips 
are taken for collecting representative 
elements of the local flora and 
preparation of an herbarium. 

Prerequisite: BIOL 1800 or 1900 or 
permission of Instructor. 




in the fall semester for day students. 
of higher plants in accordance 

Key to Course Offerings 

Q: designates courses in the 
Quantitative Scientific Cluster 

I: the Ideas and Events Ouster 

B: the Human Behavior Cluster 

L: the Literature, Language 
and Arts Cluster 

C Multicultural 

IDIS: Interdisciplinary courses 

Multicultural and interdisciplinary counts also 

fulfill a cluster designation. 

* Asterisk indicates that the course may 
be offered less than once every two years. 

▲ Undergraduate Day School 

• Undergraduate Evening School 

Courses having a more narrow focus than 
those taught on a regular basis or courses 
being taught on an experimental basis can 
be taught as Topics" courses. These courses 
will be assigned numbers based on the 
student level for which they are intended — 
first, second, third or fourth year. 



Developmental Biology 

BIOL 3550 4 cr. 6 hr. A 

Offered in the spring semester for day students. 
The course examines a detailed survey of developing embryos from 
the fertilized egg through the various stages leading to the adult 
organism. Current theories regarding the molecular mechanisms 
underlying cell differentiation and other classic developmental 
processes are also themes of this course. Other topics covered in the 
survey include regeneration, metamorphosis, aging, and cancer. 
Laboratory involves the study of development in live sea urchins, 

birds, frogs, and ferns as well as work with prepared slides 
Prerequisites: BIOL 1800, BIOL 1900, BIOL 2800, BIOL 3250, or permission 

of Instructor. 

Biology of Algae 

*BIOL 3600 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

Students collect and identify common algae found in the New 
England area. Emphasis is on freshwater forms, but some study of 
marine algae is conducted as well. Distribution of algal species is 
correlated with physical and chemical factors in their habitats. 
Laboratory includes a study of algal physiology and reproduction as 
well as techniques for cultivation. 

Prerequisite: BIOL 1400 or BIOL 1900 

Bioethics 

BIOL 3700 3 cr. 3 hr. 

Bioethics explores the clash between modern biology and human 

values. Students will have the opportunity to develop ethical 

guidelines and be prepared to think in a critical fashion about 

biologically precipitated problems. Ethical theories, genetic 

engineering, cloning, are some of the topics to be discussed. The 

course uses lectures, discussions, and case study analyses. 
Prerequisite: One semester of General Biology or Life Science or Anatomy and 

Physiology or permission of Instructor. 

Vertebrate Biology 

BIOL 3800 4cr.6hr. A 

This course provides students with a thorough introduction into the 

biology of vertebrate animals. Lecture topics include anatomy, 

physiology, ecology, and evolution of the four classes of vertebrates. 

Laboratories emphasize the mastery of skills needed to collect and 

identify vertebrates. 

Prerequisite: BIOL 1900 or permission of Instructor. 

General Microbiology 

BIOL 3900 4 cr. 6 hr. A 

Offered in the fall semester for day students. 

The structure, nutrition, and growth of bacteria is examined in this 

course as well as characterization of representative bacteria, fungi, 

viruses and protozoa. Their genetic and metabolic peculiarities, 

immunological techniques, and the immune response in man is 

studied. Laboratory work includes aseptic technique, isolation and 

cultivation of microbes, staining techniques and diagnostic metabolic 

reactions. 
Prerequisites: Organic Chemistry and BIOL 2800 or permission of Instructor. 

Endocrinology 

'BIOL 4250 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course covers chemical integration of physiological processes 
by hormones and related agents. Discussions include structure and 
function of vertebrate and other animal endocrine systems, 
neuroendocrine relationships, and other topics of current interest. 

Prerequisites: BIOL 1200/1300, or BIOL 1800/1900 and one year of 
Chemistry, or permission of Instructor. 

Molecular Biology 

'BIOL 4500 4cr.6hr. A 

The course offers studies of restriction enzymes, plasmids, gene 

cloning, recombinant DNA, DNA sequencing, oncogenes, and other 

topics of current interest. Laboratory work includes restriction 

enzyme digests and mapping, gene cloning, bacterial transformation, 

blue/white color selection, minipreps, PCR, blotting techniques and 

introduction to Bioinformatics. 

Prerequisites: BIOL 2800 and BIOL 3250. 



Evolution 

*BIOL 4600 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course is an introduction to the principles and processes 
governing the evolution of living organisms. Emphasis is placed on 
the ways by which various other biological disciplines relate to 
evolutionary studies. A survey of paleontological evidence is given to 
demonstrate how evolutionary principles have affected life. 

Prerequisites: BIOL 1900, 2300, and 2800 or permission of Instructor. 

Neurobiology 

*BIOL 4800 3cr.3hr. A 

A survey is conducted of neural activity and the neural bases of 
behavior as illustrated by simpler invertebrate and vertebrate nervous 
systems. Topics covered in the class include structure and function of 
neurons, neurodevelopment, cellular basis of behavior (sensory and 
motor systems), neuropharmacology, and neural plasticity. The class 
is facilitated by lectures and laboratory. 

Prerequisites: BIOL 1200/1300, or BIOL 1800/1900 and one year of 
Chemistry, or permission of Instructor. 

Immunology 

BIOL 4810 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

Offered in the spring semester for day students. 

The course consists of a survey of immune response, antibody 

formation and function, immunosuppression, blood group antigens 

and antibody-antigen reactions. The principles of complement 

activity, hypersensitivity, and autoallergic reactions are discussed. 

Prerequisites: BIOL 2800, BIOL 3250, or permission of Instructor. 

Biology Teaching Methods 

BIOL 4850 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course examines the methods for teaching modern Biology, 
includes a 25 hour pre-practicum, and is a prerequisite for student 
teaching Topics include methods for teaching scientific inquiry, 
bioethical decision-making, and critical thinking as well as research 
on alternative assessment, classroom management, and technology in 
the classroom. Students who plan to student teach should see 
'Teacher Preparation Programs (Undergraduate)" for additional 
requirements. 

Prerequisites: BIOL 1800/1900 and permission of Instructor. 

Independent Study 

BIOL 4901-4903 1 to 3 credits A • 

Offeredin the fall and spring semesters for day students. 
In the Independent Study participants fulfill laboratory or other 
independent research under the guidance and supervision of one or 
more faculty members. A comprehensive term paper and an oral 
presentation are required for successful completion of the project. 
Independent Study may be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 
semester hours. 

Prerequisites: junior or senior standing, 15 credits of Biology and special 
permission of the Departmental Curriculum Committee. 

Biology Practicum in a Secondary School I and II 

BIOL 4860, 4870 6 cr. 6 hr. A 

Students are assigned to cooperating secondary schools for a 
semester of student teaching. 

Internship 

BIOL 4950, 4960 3 or 6 cr. A 

Offered in the fall and spring semester for day students. 

The Internship involves off-campus laboratory or field experience in 
conjunction with established research programs at cooperating 
governmental, industrial, or private facilities. Supervision is shared by 
program directors and faculty members at Fitchburg State College. 
Assignments are contingent upon students' abilities and acceptance by 
the cooperating institution. One or two full days of work per week 
may be expected. A comprehensive term paper and an oral 
presentation are required after each semester of Internship work for 
successful completion of the project. An Internship course may be 

repeated for up to a maximum of 1 2 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: junior or senior standing and approval of the Biology 

Department. 

Directed Study 

BIOL 4975 1-6 cr. 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Business Administration 

Introduction to Computer Information Systems for 
Business 

BSAD 1700 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

This course introduces the student to computer information science 
and its applications. The student develops literacy in the computer 
and its uses. The laboratory work includes an introduction to Word 
Processing, Spreadsheets, Databases, and the fundamentals of 
programming with BASIC. No previous knowledge of computers is 
required or presumed. Credit is not awarded for both BSAD 1 700, 
Introduction to Computer Information Systems for Business and CSC 
1 100, Computer Applications. See Business Administration 
Department Chair for alternate course selections. Q 

Prerequisite: Basic Math II. 

introduction to Business 

BSAD 1850 3cr.3hr. ▲ 

Introduction to Business is a college-level survey course in business 
that explores the nature of the American free enterprise system and 
its business organizations. This course examines the role played by 
business in American society, as well as its purpose and 
responsibilities. Furthermore, it introduces the student to the practical 
operations that must exist if businesses are to create goods and 
services, and it highlights some of the major problems faced by 
managers in planning, organizing, directing, and controlling these 
areas. Therefore, this course is intended to give the student a broad 
overview of the functions, institutions, principles, and practices of 
business. 

Introduction to Financial Reporting 

BSAD 2010 3 cr. 3 hr. ▲ • 

This course provides an overview of financial accounting/reporting 
in its role as an information system within the socioeconomic 
environment of business. Financial reporting concepts and practices 
are presented from a decision perspective in which the content of 
financial statements and the analysis, interpretation, and application 
of this information in making rational business decisions are 
examined. Relationships between business events and elements of the 
financial statements are analyzed. Coverage of accounting procedures 
is presented to the extent that they are necessary to understand the 
substance of financial statement information. Internal control of 
accounting systems will be considered. A base of analytical tools will 
be provided for interpretation of financial information. Specific 
financial accounting issues related to current and long-term 
operational assets, current liabilities, debt instruments, and equity are 
discussed. 

Prerequisites: sophomore status. BSAD 1700 or CSC 1400, MATH 0200. 

Introduction to Managerial Accounting 

BSAD 2020 3 cr. 3 hr. ▲ • 

This course stresses the usefulness of accounting data as it relates to 
the managerial decision making process relative to planning, control, 
and analysis. Among the multifaceted areas of study are cost volume, 
profit analysis, budgeting, performance analysis, and organizational 
planning and control. 

Prerequisites: BSAD 2010, ECON 1200, MATH 1250. 

Business Problem Solving with Microcomputers 

BSAD 2700 3cr.3hr. ▲• 

This course uses the computer as a tool to solve business problems. 
Problem definition, analysis of problem, solution design, and 
implementation are phases leading toward the development of a 
business application system. 

Prerequisite: BSAD 1700. 



Financial Reporting Theory and Practice I (formerly 
Intermediate Accounting I) 

BSAD 3010 3cr.3hr. ▲• 

This course is designed to provide a strong conceptual, analytical, 
and procedural foundation for the study of financial reporting and 
practice. The historical development of accounting thought and the 
role of financial accounting in today's economy are investigated. 
Socioeconomic, political, legal, and ethical influences on financial 
reporting are considered. A discussion of the following issues: 
procedures to record, summarize, and report results of business 
events, content and presentation of financial statements, and specific 
reporting issues related to cash and receivable. An overview of 
financial statement analysis is also presented. International issues are 
addressed as appropriate. 

Prerequisites: BSAD 2020. 

Financial Reporting Theory and Practice II (formerly 
Intermediate Accounting I) 

BSAD 3020 3 cr. 3 hr. ▲ • 

In this course, in-depth discussion of financial reporting theory and 
practice is continued with respect to: inventories,- concurrent 
operational assets, current and contingent liabilities, long-term debt; 
and owners' equity. Financial statement analysis of these financial 
statement elements is also continued. Ethical and international issues 
are addressed throughout the semester. 

Prerequisite: BSAD 3010. 

Cost Accounting 

BSAD 3120 3 cr. 3 hr. ▲ • 

This course discusses job and process costing, managerial decision 
making using cost estimation and cost-volume-profit analysis, flexible 
budgeting, transfer pricing, and capital investment decisions. 

Prerequisites: BSAD 2020. 

Principles of Management 

BSAD 3200 3 cr. 3 hr. ▲ • 

This is an introductory course in basic management concepts and 
practices. This course covers principles and techniques as they relate 
to planning, organizing, leading, and controlling business enterprises. 

Human Resources Management 

BSAD 3210 3 cr. 3 hr. ▲ • 

This is an introductory course which surveys human resources 
practices and procedures involved with recruiting, employment, 
training and development, job evaluation, compensation, health and 
safety, labor relations, and workplace law Special topics of student 
interest are also covered. 

Prerequisite: BSAD 3200. 

Production Management 

BSAD 3220 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

This course provides an overview of business operations In light of 
selected production improvement techniques (automation, incentive 
wage system, etc.), students review the role of selected staff 
departments (purchasing, production 
planning, etc.) that support the line 
organization. In the process, students 
become familiar with a variety of 
control systems (quality control, 
inventory control, etc.), which are 
fundamental in any business — 
whether product or service oriented. 
Prerequisite: BSAD 3200. 

Fundamentals of Marketing 

BSAD 3300 3 cr. 3 hr. ▲ • 

This course discusses the role of 
marketing in our economic and social 
structure. It includes the planning, 
distribution, pricing, and promotion of 
goods and services to consumer and 
industrial markets in the context of 
internal activities of the firm and 
environmental forces. 



Key to Course Offerings 

Q: designates courses in the 
Quantitative Scientific Cluster 

1: the Ideas and Events Ouster 

B: the Human Behavior Ouster 

L: the Literature, Language 
and Arts Ouster 

G Multicultural 

IDIS: Interdisciplinary courses 

Multicultural and mterdisaplmary course also 

fulfill a cluster designation. 

* Asterisk indicates that the course may 
be offered less than once every two years. 

A Undergraduate Day School 

• Undergraduate Evening School 

Gxirses having a more narrow focus than 
those taught on a regular basis or courses 
being taught on an experimental basis can 
be taught as Topics" courses. These courses 
will be assigned numbers based on the 
student level for which they are intended — 
first, second, third or fourth year. 



Consumer Behavior 

BSAD 3310 3 cr. 3 hr. ▲ • 

This course familiarizes the student with the consumer decision 

making processes. It utilizes the concepts of the social and behavioral 

sciences in order to provide an understanding of consumer buying 

behavior. 

Prerequisites: BSAD 3300. 

Market Research 

BSAD 3320 3 cr. 3 hr. ▲ • 

This course emphasizes the importance of research in marketing 

planning and decision making. Instruction includes the basics of 

scientific investigation, the search for information, sampling, data 

collection, data analysis, interpretation, and reporting. 

Prerequisites: BSAD 3300. 

Advertising 

BSAD 3330 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

In this course students become knowledgeable about the preparation 

and use of advertising. Topics include the functions of advertising, 

planning an advertising campaign, copy, artwork, and media 

selection. 

Prerequisites: BSAD 2020, 3200, 3300, 3500. 

Small Business Management 

BSAD 3340 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course provides the students with an understanding of the 

unique characteristics required of the successful small business 

entrepreneur and the specifics relative to the start-up, financing and 

management of a small business. Emphasis is on a full spectrum of 

business functions as applied to small firms, including proprietorships, 

partnerships, corporations, and franchised outlets. 

Prerequisites: BSAD 3200, 3300. 

TQM (Total Quality Management) 

BSAD 3350 3 cr. 3 hr. ▲ • 

This course studies the concepts, practices, and methods of 

contemporary quality management in both manufacturing and 

service-related industries. Topics may include quality management, 

customer service, leadership, measuring quality, statistical process, and 

teamwork. 

Prerequisite: BSAD 3200. 

Basic Finance 

BSAD 3400 3 cr. 3 hr. ▲ • 

This course studies the forms and sources of financing business 

firms, large and small, corporate and noncorporate. The emphasis is 

on financial planning and financial problem solving. 

Prerequisite: BSAD 2020. 

Investments 

BSAD 3410 3 cr. 3 hr. ▲ • 

The course analyzes stocks, corporate and governmental bonds, and 

other investment media, and studies the secondary stock market 

mechanism. Students review various investment vehicles and security 

evolution. Research of individual companies and industries is required 

The course is primarily facilitated by lectures and problem solving. 

Prerequisites: BSAD 2020, 3200, 3300. 

Real Estate Principles and Practices 

BSAD 3440 3 cr. 3 hr. ▲• 

Using a business perspective this course explores real estate use, 

ownership, and development as well as its social impact and business 

constraints. The effect of home ownership on executive transfers and 

company costs is examined. Current terminology in the field is 

defined, including property rights, ownership, financing, planning for 

the future, property evaluation, and property management. 

Prerequisite: BSAD 3200. 



Real Estate Investment and Management 

BSAD 3460 3 cr. 3 hr. ▲ • 

The course looks at the business decisions involved in the 

investment, financing, and management of real estate. This course 

focuses on real estate as a popular investment vehicle because of the 

number of income-producing characteristics it possesses. Students 

learn the principles of cash flow, changing property values, equity 

investor, decision-making, risk and return, and market research in 

light of current real estate trends. 

Prerequisites: BSAD 2020, 3200, 3300, 3400. 

Business Law I 

BSAD 3500 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

This course is an introduction to the study of business law, its nature 
and classification, the court systems, and their procedures Contract 
law, the law of sales, and personal property are considered 
comprehensively. 

Systems Analysis Methods 

BSAD 3710 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

As an overview of the system development life cycle, this course 
introduces the student to the fundamental concepts and techniques of 
systems analysis Classical and structured methods of systems 
documentation are explored as well as information gathering and 
reporting activities. 

Prerequisite: BSAD 3900 and CSC 3450 

Computer Concepts and Programming Techniques 

BSAD 3720 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course is a survey of technical topics related to computer 

systems with emphasis on the relationship between computer 

architecture, system software, and applications software. 

Prerequisites: BSAD 3710, CSC 2700. 

Financial Reporting Theory and Practice III 

BSAD 4010 A • 

In this course, in-depth discussion of financial reporting theory and 

practices continued with respect to: inventories, concurrent 

operational assets,- current and contingent liabilities,- long-term debt,- 

and owners' equity. Financial statement analysis of these financial 

statement elements is also continued. Ethical and international issues 

are addressed throughout the semester. 

Prerequisite: BSAD 3020, MATH 1800. 

Consolidations and Mergers 

BSAD 4100 3 cr. 3hr. A • 

This course includes accounting problems involved in the 

preparation of consolidated financial statements and in home and 

branch office relationships. The accounting concepts of purchasing 

and pooling of interests are stressed. 

Prerequisites: BSAD 3020, including all related prerequisites. 

International Accounting and Taxation 

BSAD 4110 3 cr. 3 hr. ▲ • 

This course will provide an understanding of the International 

Accounting standards and the International Taxation rules within the 

accounting profession. U.S. accounting practices and foreign 

accounting practices in selected countries will be discussed Taxation 

issues will center on US taxes, both corporate and individual, for 

outbound and inbound transactions. 

Prerequisites: BSAD 3020. 

Individual Taxation 

BSAD 4120 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

This course studies the Federal Income Tax Laws, as they apply to 

individuals, in compliance and tax planning opportunities. 

Prerequisites: BSAD 3020. Financial Reporting 
Theory and Practice II (including all related prerequisites). 

Corporate, Estate, and Gift Taxation 
(formerly Advanced Taxation) 

BSAD 4130 3cr.3hr. A 

This course studies the Federal Income Tax Laws and regulations in 

both compliance and tax planning opportunities applicable to 

partnerships, corporations, fiduciaries, and gift and estate taxes. 

Prerequisite: BSAD 4120. 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Auditing 

BSAD 4140 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

The basic concepts of auditing and control are examined in this 
course. It emphasizes internal control, audit problems, and 
professional responsibilities of the CPA to the auditing requirements. 

Prerequisite: BSAD 4010. 

Not For Profit Accounting 

*BSAD 4160 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course examines the accounting and reporting principles, 
standards, and procedures as they apply to governmental and not-for- 
profit entities, such as governmental organizations, hospitals, colleges, 

and universities. 

Prerequisites: BSAD 3020, including all related prerequisites. 

Organizational Behavior and Theory 

BSAD 4200 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

This course is a general descriptive and analytical study of 

organizations from the behavioral science point of view. It includes 

problems of motivation, leadership, morale, social structure, group 

networks, communications, hierarchy, and control in complex 

organizations. The interaction between technology and human 

behavior is discussed. Alternative theoretical models are considered. 

Prerequisites: BSAD 3200. 

Social and Political Environment of Business 

BSAD 4210 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

This course is a study of the evolution of American business in the 

context of its changing political and social environment. Analysis of 

the origins of the American business creed, the concept of social 

responsibility of business, and the expanding role of the corporation 

is included. 

Prerequisites: BSAD 3200. 

Business Fluctuations and Forecasting 

BSAD 4230 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

The analysis of public and business policies which are necessary as a 
result of business fluctuations within our capitalist free enterprise 
system often require technical forecasting. This course will emphasize 
this technical forecasting aspect. 

Prerequisites: ECON 1200, MATH 1800. 

Ethical Decisions in Business 

BSAD 4250 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

This course is designed to explore, discuss, and analyze the values 
and methods that can be used by our future business managers to 
make ethical decisions in live business situations. It provides a basis 
for considering the type of corporate policy and environment 
essential for minimizing the conflict between "right" and "the end 
justifies the means." 

Sales Management 

BSAD 4300 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

This course enhances the students' understanding of and skills for 
managing the selling function. The emphasis of the course work is on 
personal selling as an element in the marketing mix. 

Prerequisites: BSAD 3300. 

Retail Marketing 

BSAD 4310 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

This course introduces the student to the nature and scope of retail 
marketing and management. The course includes the structure of 
retailing, merchandising, buying, pricing, promotion, organization, as 
well as management of the retail firm. 

Prerequisites: BSAD 3300. 

Industrial Marketing 

BSAD 4320 3 cr. 3 hr. ▲• 

This course centers on the marketing of goods to industrial firms, 
governmental agencies, and other organizations included within the 
industrial market. The areas covered in the course include distribution 
channels, pricing policies, product planning, and market strategy. 

Prerequisites: BSAD 3200. 



International Marketing 

BSAD 4330 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

This course concentrates on the marketing activities of firms 
operating in an international market. It provides the student with an 
understanding of the factors that influence the selling of products in 
international markets. The planning, organizing, and controlling of 
international marketing is explored along with its law, history, and 
economics. 

Prerequisites: BSAD 3300. 

Developing Marketing Strategies 

BSAD 4340 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

Through the use of case studies and, where possible, cooperating 
businesses and nonprofit organizations, students identify pertinent 
marketing problems and opportunities, assess the organization's 
resources, and develop viable marketing programs. The course 
includes new product development and management strategies for 
effective marketing policies over the course of the entire product life cycle. 

Prerequisites: BSAD 3300. 

Financial Management of Corporations 

BSAD 4440 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

This course covers the analysis and management of the flow of 
funds through an enterprise. Cash management, source, and 
application of funds, as well as term loans and types and sources of 
long term capital are examined. As an introduction to capital 
markets, the class explores capital budgeting, cost of capital, and 
financial structure. 

Prerequisite: BSAD 3400. 

Business Law II 

BSAD 4500 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

This course is a continuation of Introduction to Business Law and 

deals with the law of agency, commercial paper, credit, and the 

various forms of business. 

Prerequisite: BSAD 3500. 

Systems Design & Implementation 

BSAD 4700 3cr.3hr. A« 

This capstone course will emphasize the design and implementation 
phases of the system development life cycle using case studies. A 
problem solving approach will be used for students to learn strategy 
and techniques for dealing with complexities in Information Systems 
Development. 

Prerequisite: CSC/BSAD 3710 

Data Base Management Systems 

*BSAD 4720 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

This course provides an introduction to the concepts of data base 

processing with emphasis on application programming in a database 

environment. Physical and logical organization of data, data 

relationships, and operational requirements of a database management 

system are also discussed. 

Prerequisites: BSAD 3710, CSC 2700. 

Applied Software Development 

BSAD 4730 3 cr. 3 hr. A „ _ _ „ _ 

. . . . ., KA , C Key to Course Offerings 

As the capstone course in the MIS _. f . . . 

... . , (J: designates courses in the 

concentration, this course requires the Quantitative Scientific Cluster 

student to apply concepts, principles, |. the Ideas and Events Ouster 

and problem solving techniques, as B: the Human Behavior Cluster 

well as strategies and tools learned in L the Literature, Language 
previous MIS and business courses to and A^ Cluster 

the development of a realistic C: Multicultural 

computer-based information system of 1DIS: Interdisciplinary courses 

medium complexity. Multicultural mi mterdisaplmry counts also 

Prerequisite: BSAD 3720. mfachtinfa^on. 

* Astensk indicates that the course may 
be offered less than once every two years. 

▲ Undergraduate Day School 

• Undergraduate Evening School 

Courses having a more narrow focus than 
those taught on a regular basis or courses 
being taught on an experimental basis can 
be taught as Topics" courses. These courses 
will be assigned numbers based on the 
student level forwhich they are intended — 
first, second, third or fourth year. 




International Business Management 

BSAD 4880 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course provides an analysis of the complexities of doing 
business overseas. Emphasis is on commerce, trade, and investments. 
Topics include cultural differences, market barriers, business 
practices, product/market strategies, distribution and organization 
for small firms and multinational corporations. 

Prerequisite: senior status in Business Administration or permission of 

Department Chairperson. 

Business Policy and Strategy 

BSAD 4890 3 cr. 3 hr. ▲ • 

This course integrates all organic management functions. Cases are 

used as subjects for analysis and systematic decision making practice. 
Prerequisite: senior status in Business Administration 
or permission of Department Chairperson. 

Independent Study-Management 

BSAD 4903 3 cr. ▲ • 

Independent Study-Accounting 

BSAD 4913 3cr. ▲ • 

Independent Study-Marketing 

BSAD 4923 3 cr. ▲ • 

Independent Study-CIS 

BSAD 4933 3cr. ▲ • 

To study specific, advanced topics in the Business Administration 
area, students must have the approval of supervising instructor and 
the department. 

Independent Study-Management 

BSAD 4902 2 cr. ▲ • 

independent Study-Accounting 

BSAD 4914 2cr. ▲ • 

Independent Study-Marketing 

BSAD 4934 2 cr. A • 

Independent Study-Management 

BSAD 4915 lcr. A • 

Independent Study-Accounting 

BSAD 4925 lcr. A • 

Independent Study-Marketing 

BSAD 4935 lcr. A • 

Independent Study-CIS 

BSAD 4945 lcr. A • 

Internship: Business Laboratory 

BSAD 4910 lcr. A • 

BSAD 4920 2cr. A • 

BSAD 4930 3 cr. A • 

The (1,2,3 credit) Business Laboratory Internships operate within the 

Business and Technology Training Center. The Business laboratory is a 

learning laboratory that allows students to work on various projects 

Students will participate in developing and operating their own consulting 

firm in the laboratory. They will develop outreach to large, medium, and 

small businesses, organizations, institutions, and enterprises. Students may 

earn up to 6 credits throughout their four years of college. 

BSAD 4950 6 cr. ▲• 

This course is a part time (18 hr. week) internship in either the 

private or public sector. The purpose of the course is to allow the 

student the opportunity to synthesize the theoretical learning of the 

classroom with a practical work situation. 

Prerequisite: approval by Internship Director. 

Internship 

BSAD 4970 12 cr. A • 

This course is a full semester (36 hr. week) Internship in either the 

private or public sector. The purpose of the course is to allow the 

student the opportunity to synthesize the theoretical learning of the 

classroom with a practical work situation. 

Prerequisite: approval by Internship Director. 



Internal Departmental Practicums 
(Business Laboratories) 

BSAD 4915, 4925, 4935 (see Independent Studies) A 

Students will participate in a series of Learning Laboratories, 

including a student-run consulting firm. The Business Administration 

Department offers students opportunities to receive up to six credits 

by working on actual business projects on campus and in the community. 
Prerequisite: permission of Department Chairperson. 

Directed Study 

BSAD 4975 1-6 cr. 



▲ • 



Chemistry 



Industrial Chemistry 

CHEM 1000 4 cr. 6 hr. A 

This introduction to chemistry includes a study of the periodic 
table, atomic structure, electrochemistry, thermochemistry, chemical 
bonding, kinetics, oxidation-reduction, acids-bases, thermodynamics, 
and a brief introduction to organic compounds. Q 

Prerequisite: MATH 1300. 

Pre-Biochemistry 

CHEM 1100 4cr.5hr. A* 

This course provides the fundamentals of chemistry for non-science 
majors. Material is limited to basic concepts in general chemistry that 
are necessary for understanding the principles of organic and 
biochemistry. This course replaces Chemistry I and is required for 
Nursing Majors Q 

Elements of Human Biochemistry and Organic Chemistry 

CHEM 1200 4 cr. 5 hr. A • 

This course is a continuation of Pre-Biochemistry I or the 

equivalent. The course material also includes a study of organic 

chemistry and human biochemistry. This course replaces Chemistry 

II and is required for Nursing Majors Q 

Prerequisite: CHEM 1100. 

General Chemistry I 

CHEM 1300 4cr.6hr. ▲• 

The course explores the fundamental laws and theories of chemistry 
such as atomic structure, the periodic table, electrochemistry, 
descriptive inorganic chemistry, the gas laws, solutions, equilibrium 
calculations, and chemical bonding. Chemical calculations are 
emphasized. Q 

General Chemistry II 

CHEM 1400 4cr.6hr. ▲• 

This course is a continuation of General Chemistry I. Topics 

included are chemical, acid/base, and solubility equilibria, and 

chemical kinetics. Q 

Prerequisite: CHEM 1300. 

Organic Chemistry I 

CHEM 2000 4cr.6hr. ▲• 

Properties of organic compounds are discussed in terms of their 

molecular structures and reaction mechanisms. This course is 

recommended for those who need for a solid theoretical foundation 

in chemistry, especially those contemplating graduate study in science 

or medicine. Q 

Prerequisites: CHEM 1400. 

Organic Chemistry II 

CHEM 2100 4cr.6hr. ▲• 

This course is a continuation of CHEM 2000. Q 

Prerequisite: CHEM 2000. 

Analytical Chemistry I 

CHEM 3000 4cr.6hr. A 

The course emphasizes theory and application of Quantitative 

Analysis. The lectures stress chemical equilibrium, solubility product, 

complexometric formation, oxidation-reduction, and stoichiometric 

calculations. 

Prerequisites: CHEM 1300, 1400, 2000, 2100 or the equivalent. 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Physical Chemistry I 

CHEM 3200 4cr.6hr. A 

The course explores the underlying principles of chemistry from a 

physical chemistry standpoint. Topics of discussion include kinetic 

theory, theories of the structure of matter, theory of solutions, 

electrochemistry, thermodynamics, spectroscopy, and kinetics. 

Prerequisite: CHEM 2100 or the equivalent. 

Physical Chemistry II 

CHEM 3300 4cr.6hr. A 

The course is a continuation of Physical Chemistry I. 

Prerequisite: CHEM 3200. 

Analytical Chemistry II 

CHEM 3500 4cr.6hr. A 

The course studies Instrumental Analysis. Laboratory experiments 

include spectrophotometric, conductometric, potentiometric, and 

chromatographic analyses. 

Prerequisites: CHEM 2100 and CHEM 3000 or the equivalent 

Advanced Topics 

Student and faculty availability determine the following course 
offerings. 

Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 

'CHEM 3600 3cr.3hr. A 

The course studies bonding theories, acid-base theories, reactions in 
non-aqueous solvents, complexation and chelation, reactivity, and 
physical measurements. 

Prerequisite: CHEM 1400 or the equivalent 

Natural Products 

* CHEM 4000 3cr.3hr. A 

This course examines chemistry isolation, purification, and 
identification of pure compounds from a variety of naturally occurring 
substances. Special techniques are introduced whenever feasible. 

Prerequisites: CHEM 2000 and 2100. 

Biochemistry (See BIOL 3450). 

CHEM 4100 4cr.6hr. A 

Prerequisite: CHEM 2100. 

Polymer Chemistry 

'CHEM 4200 4cr.6hr. A 

This introduction to the synthesis and properties of macromolecules 
also serves as an application of chemical principles to this interesting 
and important group of materials. 

Prerequisites: CHEM 2000 and 2100 or the equivalent. 

Radiation Chemistry 

CHEM 4300 4 cr. 4 hr. A 

The fundamentals of radiation chemistry are explored, including 

radioactivity, atomic nuclei, nuclear reactions, decay systematics, 

reactors, and radiation detection and measurement. Emphasis is 

placed on the use of radioactive materials in chemical applications. 

Prerequisites: CHEM 1400, PHYS 1400. 

Forensic Chemistry 

CHEM 4400 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course studies forensic detection of crimes by examining 
physical evidence, such as hair, fibers, paint, drugs, DNA, 
fingerprints, firearms, and tool marks, as well as toxicology, arson, 
explosion, serology, rape victims, document, and voice examination. 

Independent Study in Chemistry 

CHEM 4900 lto3 cr. A 

This independent study facilitates laboratory research under the 
guidance of the Chemistry staff. 

Prerequisite: permission of the Instructor. 

Internship 

CHEM 4940 3 cr. A 

The Internship gives the student an opportunity to work in an 
industrial, government, or private research laboratory to gain 
experience relevant to their major. 



Internship 

CHEM 4950 6 cr. A 

The Internship gives the student an opportunity to work in an 
industrial, government, or private research laboratory to gain 
experience relevant to their major. 

Directed Study 

CHEM 4975 1-6 cr. A 

Clinical Laboratory Sciences 

Introduction to Clinical Laboratory Sciences 

CLS 1000 lcr.2hr. A 

An integrated lecture-laboratory course designed to acquaint the 
student with the role and duties of technologists, including 
employment opportunities and educational requirements for the 
profession. The Laboratory portion of the class includes: introduction 
to techniques in hematology, clinical chemistry, immunohematology, 
and clinical microbiology. 

Clinical Laboratory Techniques 

CLS 1400 3cr.5hr. A 

The course studies the clinical laboratory's role in assessing the 
kidney in health and disease. The microscopic and chemical analysis 
of urine is taught with emphasis on correlation of test data to disease 
diagnosis. Techniques and theory of phlebotomy studied. 

Prerequisite: BIOL 2420 or the permission of Instructor. 

Basic Hematology 

CLS 2000 3cr.5hr. A 

This course is an introduction to the composition and formation of 
blood and blood cells. Laboratory exercises include routine 
procedures used in the hematology laboratory such as staining, cell 
counting and identification, selected manual methods and application 
of quality control procedures. 

Prerequisite: BIOL 1800, CLS 2100 or permission of Instructor. 

Basic Laboratory Skills 

CLS 2100 4cr.6hr. A 

Through lecture and laboratory sessions, students will review basic 
principles of chemistry, laboratory math, and statistics as they learn to 
accurately measure, calculate, and quantify analytes Quality control 
principles are also examined. The basic standards, theory and 
terminology associated with phlebotomy are introduced with 
laboratory practice in venipuncture and fingerstick techniques. Q 
Prerequisite: MATH 1700; CHEM 1300 and 1400, or permission of instructor. 

Professional Issues in Clinical Laboratory Science 

CLS 3000 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course explores economic, political, and social issues pertinent 
to health care delivery. Professional and personal ethics, 
interpersonal communication skills, interview techniques, career 
options for laboratory personnel, basic education, and management 
strategies are emphasized. 

Prerequisite: CLS 1000 or permission of 
Instructor. 



Human Biochemistry I 

CLS 3100 4cr.6hr. A 

The study of the biochemical 
properties of carbohydrates, amino 
acids, proteins and lipids specifically 
related to the human body Major 
metabolic pathways of glucose 
metabolism in the liver and body cells, 
mechanisms of enzyme action and 
bioenergetics will be discussed. 
Physiological topics related to the 
gastrointestinal tract, nutrition, liver, 
nerve and muscle function are 
discussed. Laboratory sessions 

complement lecture. Q 

Prerequisite: CHEM 1300, 1400, 2000, 
and 2100. 



Key to Course Offerings 

Q: designates courses in the 
Quantitative Scientific Cluster 

I: the Ideas and Events Ouster 

B: the Human Behavior Cluster 

L: the Literature, Language 
and Arts Cluster 

C Multicultural 

IDIS: Interdisciplinary courses 

Multicultural and interdisciplinary counts also 

juljill a cluster designation. 

* Asterisk indicates that the course may 
be offered less than once every two years. 

A Undergraduate Day School 

• Undergraduate Evening School 

Courses having a more narrow focus than 
those taught on a regular basis or courses 
being taught on an experimental basis can 
be taught as Topics" courses These courses 
will be assigned numbers based on the 
student level for which they are intended — 
first, second, third or fourth year. 



Human Biochemistry II 

CLS 3150 4cr.6hr. A 

Continuation of CLS 3100. Topics include the biochemical 
properties of RNA, DNA, fatty acid and amino acid metabolism. 
Physiological topics related to renal and endocrine function, skeletal 
and mineral metabolism, and water balance are discussed. 
Laboratory sessions complement lecture and include urinalysis. Q 

Prerequisite: CLS 3100. 

Immunoassay/CIinical Virology 

CLS 3200 3cr.5hr. A 

The course studies in vitro antigen-antibody reactions and theory of 
serological reactions. The practical application of theory to clinical 
laboratory testing, enzyme assays, immunoelectrophoresis, 
agglutination and precipitation tests is studied and performed. An 
overview of viral structure, oncogenesis, and viral infections of man is 
given. 

Prerequisite: BIOL 3900. 

Parasitology/ Mycology 

CLS 3400 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

Life cycles, identification, and clinical pathology of parasites in 
humans are studied in this course along with common mycotic 
infections of humans and methods of identification. 

Prerequisite: BIOL 3900. 

Clinical Hematology I 

CLS 4000 4cr.6hr. A 

This course focuses on an examination of red cells and white cells 
and the laboratory testing used in the detection of anemias and 
leukemias. Students study the pathophysiology of bone marrow and 
peripheral blood while performing routine and special procedures 
used in the clinical Hematology lab. 

Prerequisite: CLS 2000. Open to senior CLS majors only and permission of 

Instructor. 

Clinical Hematology II 

CLS 4050 3cr.5hr. A 

The course is a continuation of Hematology I with special emphasis 

on Hematology Instrumentation, Quality Control principles and 

Body Fluid Analysis In addition, the course includes the study of 

Hemostasis and tests related to the detection of bleeding and 

thrombotic problems. A clinical practicum at an affiliated laboratory is 

performed at the conclusion of the course. 

Prerequisite: CLS 4000. Open to senior CLS majors only and permission of 

Instructor. 

Issues in Clinical Microbiology I 

CLS 4100 2cr.2hr. A 

Students will perform an in-depth investigation of concepts, 
theories, or problems that are of importance to clinical 
microbiologists. Students will become skilled at searching the 
current literature and will enhance their verbal communication skills 
as they discuss their findings with the group. 

Co-requisite: CLS 4400. S/U grading only. 

Issues in Clinical Microbiology II 

CLS 4150 2cr.2hr. A 

Continuation of CLS 4100. 

Co-requisite: CLS 4450. S/U grading only. 

Clinical Chemistry i 

CLS 4200 4cr.6hr. A 

The course provides a detailed study of the biochemical processes 
associated with health and disease. Students learn about the 
measurement of constituents in the blood and body fluids to monitor 
health and facilitate the diagnosis of disease. Emphasis is placed on 
interpretation, disease correlation, problem solving, and quantitative 

techniques. 

Prerequisites: CLS 3100 and 3150. Open to senior CLS majors only and 

permission of Instructor. 

Clinical Chemistry II 

CLS 4250 4cr.6hr. A 

This course is a continuation of CLS 4200. A clinical practicum is 
performed at an affiliated laboratory at the conclusion of the class 
Prerequisites: CLS 4200. Open to senior CLS majors only and permission of 

Instructor. 



Issues in Clinical Chemistry I 

CLS 4300 2cr.2hr. A 

Students will perform an in-depth investigation of concepts, 
theories, or problems that are of importance to clinical chemists. 
Students will become skilled at searching the current literature and 
will enhance their verbal communication skills as they discuss their 
findings with the group. 

Co-requisite: CLS 4200. S/U grading only. 

Issues in Clinical Chemistry II 

CLS 4350 2 cr. 2 hr. A 

Continuation of CLS 4300. 

Prerequisite: CLS 4300; Co-requisite: CLS 4250. S/U grading only. 

Clinical Microbiology I 

CLS 4400 3cr.5hr. A 

Students learn techniques for the isolation and identification of 
common human pathogenic bacteria and methods for susceptibility 
testing. Instruction includes techniques used in the diagnostic 
microbiology laboratory. 

Prerequisites: BIOL 3900, CLS 3400. Open to senior CLS majors only and 

permission of Instructor. 

Clinical Microbiology II 

CLS 4450 3cr.5hr. A 

Techniques used to diagnose human infectious disease are covered in 
this class. The isolation and identification of uncommon human 
pathogenic bacteria is studied along with antibiotic structure and 
function. A clinical practicum is performed at affiliated laboratory at 
the conclusion of the class. 
Prerequisites: CLS 4400. Open to senior CLS majors only and permission of 

Instructor. 

Immunohematology I 

CLS 4600 3cr.5hr. A 

The theory and laboratory techniques involved in blood banking are 
examined in this course. Areas of study include common blood types, 
screening and preparation of donors, crossmatching, antigen- 
antibody reactions, and serological procedures. 

Prerequisites: BIOL 2800, 4810. Open to sen/or CLS majors only and 

permission of Instructor. 

Immunohematology II 

CLS 4650 1 cr. 2 hr. A 

The course is a continuation of CLS 4600. It includes a short 

practicum in an affiliated blood bank laboratory. 
Prerequisites: CLS 4600. Open to senior CLS majors only and permission of 

Instructor. 

Clinical Correlations I 

CLS 4800 lcr.2hr. A 

This Seminar is designed to demonstrate the interrelationships 

between clinical laboratory disciplines. A case study approach is 

utilized to help students integrate laboratory information. 

Corerequisites: CLS 4000, 4200, 4400, 4600. Open to senior CLS majors 
only and permission of Instructor. S/U grading only. 

Clinical Correlations II 

CLS 4850 lcr.2hr. A 

The course is a continuation of CLS 4800 using the seminar and 

case study approach. 

Corerequisites: CLS 4050, 4250, 4450, 4650. Open to senior CLS majors 
only and permission of Instructor. S/U grading only. 

Independent Study 

CIS 4901, 2, 3 1,2,3 cr. A 

Open to students who have permission of supervising Instructor and 
department. The course of study, meetings, and project presentation 
are arranged upon approval. 

Internship 

CLS 4940 A 

Directed Study 

CIS 4975 1-6 cr. 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Communications Media 

Systems and Theories of Communication 

COMM 1105 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

An introductory course that explores the ways in which 
communication is studied and discussed in both academic and 
professional arenas. The course covers the process and social 
implications of communication. It examines the history and current 
structure of several media, including print, graphic design, 
photography, film, television, and sound recording. It also examines 
the technological and social systems that are associated with the field. 

Message Design 

COMM 1120 3cr.3hr. A 

The course introduces visual communication for the development of 
visual literacy. Students become involved with a variety of activities in 
previsualization, planning, designing, making, and evaluating visual 
messages. This course specifically relates to the communications 
concentrations taught in Phase II, including technical writing, 
television, photography, film, interactive, and graphic design. 

Script Writing 

COMM 2320 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

Students are instructed in the basics of script writing for film, 
television, and multi- image productions, including preparation of 
proposals, treatments, storyboards, and scripts. Script formats covered 
in the class include documentary, educational, corporate, and 
dramatic film/video writing. See also ENGL 2320. 

History of Photography 

COMM 2400 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course presents a survey of the development of photography to 
the present day. L 

History of Film I 

COMM 2405 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

An examination of the major and influential works, artists, 
movements, cultures and industries in world cinema from its 
beginnings to the 1950s, as well as the field's historiography and 
modes of inquiry. L, C 

History of Film II 

COMM 2415 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

An examination of the major and influential works, artists, 
movements, cultures and industries in world cinema from the 1950s 
to the present, as well as the field's historiography and modes of 
inquiry. Fulfills computer literacy requirement. L, C 

History of TV 

'COMM 2420 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course provides a comprehensive analysis of television 
broadcasting from its inception to the present. The social and 
technological aspects of the medium are presented and examined in a 
lecture and seminar format. Particular emphasis is placed on 
television's sociological influence and impact on the communication 
process. I 

History of Graphic Design 

'COMM 2430 3cr.3hr. A 

This course presents the history of typography and its pertinence to 
graphic design from the beginning of written history to the present. 
Emphasis is placed on various movement of avant garde typography 
of the early twentieth century and its influence on present day 
graphic design. L 

Journalism 

COMM 2800 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course studies the press with emphasis on ethics in news, 
treatment of contemporary issues, and structuring the news story. 
Students write individualized assignments. (Credit is not given for 
both COMM 2800 and ENGL 2800.) 

Prerequisites: ENGL 1100, ENGL 1200. 



Multimedia Project Design 

COMM 3304 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course provides an introduction to the history, theory, and 
practice of designing communications for interactive/multimedia 
environments. Special attention is paid to flowcharting, branching, 
hierarchy structures, screen design, storyboards, scripting, and all 
aspects of user interface design. Students also consider the roles of 
learning theory and instructional design as they create design 
documents for course projects. 

Interactive Media I 

COMM 3305 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

By using an interactive application students explore the use of 
digital audio, video, stills, presentation software, and elementary 
authoring. Students work with advanced features of the computer 
operating system and common software resources, such as databases 
and communications. 

Interactive Media II 

COMM 3306 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course studies authoring tools and the logic structures that 

various design tools offer the producer/developer and the production 

team. Students integrate audio, still imagery, video, and hypertext 

into course projects. 

Prerequisite: COMM 3304 and COMM 3305. 

Interactive Media III 

COMM 3307 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

A study of advanced techniques of authoring, design, and 
production that students apply in sponsored projects. Working in 
groups of three or four, students simulate a professional design 
team's production regimen in order to complete an advanced 
multimedia production of professional portfolio quality. 

Prerequisite: COMM 3306. 

Interactive Media Seminar 

COMM 3308 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This seminar provides an opportunity to study advanced topics of 
multimedia design and development. Subjects covered in the seminar 
include design and application of game theory, computerized 
animation, morphing techniques, and virtual reality. 

Prerequisite: permission of the Instructor. 

Interface Design 

COMM 3309 

This course investigates the design of interactive interfaces for 

multimedia and World Wide Web presentation. Students explore 

how the conceptual and aesthetic aspects of graphic design apply 

specifically to non-linear interactive digital environments. 

Prerequisites: COMM 3810 and COMM 3305. 

DVD Authoring 

COMM 3350 

DVD-Video is the distribution medium of choice for film/video and 
interactive multimedia content. This course bridges the film/video 
and interactive media tracks to address 
video compression and menu design 
for DVD-Video. Students will learn 
and apply skills used by DVD 
industry professionals in the 
production of significant DVD 



projects. 

Prerequisites: COMM 3305 and COMM 
3740 or Permission of Instructor. 

Writing for Advertising 

COMM 3430 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course provides an introduction 
to the principles, strategies, and 
ethical issues in writing advertising for 
various media. Students create written 
copy for individual unified media 
campaigns. 



Key to Course Offerings 

Q: designates courses in the 
Quantitative Scientific Cluster 

I: the Ideas and Events Ouster 

B: the Human Behavior Cluster 

L: the Literature, Language 
and Arts Cluster 

C Multicultural 

1D1S: Interdisciplinary courses 

Multicultural and interdisciplinary counts also 

juljill a cluster designation. 

* Asterisk indicates that the course may 
be offered less than once every two years. 

▲ Undergraduate Day School 

• Undergraduate Evening School 

Courses having a more narrow focus than 
those taught on a regular basis or courses 
being taught on an experimental basis can 
be taught as 'Topics" courses These courses 
will be assigned numbers based on the 
student level for which they are intended — 
first, second, third or fourth year. 



Public Relations 

COMM 3460 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The focus in this course is on the role of managed communications 
in public relations unique to industry, human services, and 
educational institutions. Definitions and concepts, history, potential 
careers, and research methods are examined. 

Technical Documentation 

COMM 3470 3 cr. 3 hr. ▲ • 

This course gives students the opportunity to study and write the 
basic forms of technical documentation found in business and 
industry, including end-user manuals and training guides. Examination 
of graphics, typography, and desktop publishing is considered as they 
apply to hardcopy production. (See also ENGL 3470.) 

Introduction to Film and Video 

COMM 3505 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This is the foundation course for the Video/Film concentration. 
Students are introduced to the basics of production and post- 
production in the two media Topics include: understanding and using 
visual language, film and video camera operation, understanding the 
film and video production process, basic film and video nonlinear 
editing, production crew structure, and interpersonal communication. 
Students shoot super 8 film and video tape and then edit both the 
film and video. Student are required to purchase film and video tape 
as well as pay for processing. 

Pre-Production Planning for Film and Video 

COMM 3506 3 cr. 3 hr. 

This course considers the intent and purpose of a message as a first 
step in media production. The social and cultural implications of 
media storytelling are examined The course focuses on clearly 
defining message content, intent and audience as a precursor to an 
exploration of how particular film and video techniques communicate 
and are interpreted. Teams will subsequently develop the pre- 
production planning needed for a short film or video work, including: 
idea development, script treatments, story development, script 
writing, rewriting, storyboarding, script breakdown, production 
scheduling and resource planning. 

Prerequisite: COMM 3505 

Audio Production for Film and Video 

COMM 3510 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course covers audio production basics — field, studio and booth 
audio acquisition, logging, mastering and archiving — with an 
emphasis on audio's role in film and video production. By the end of 
the course, the student will be able to capture the highest quality 
audio in the manner most effective for integration during film or 
video post- production. 

Prerequisite: COMM 3505. 

Intermediate Video Production 

COMM 3520 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course focuses on the development of the skills necessary for 

single-camera video production, including shooting and recording 

with directed video equipment, location sound recording, location 

lighting, directing, nonlinear editing, and other post- production 

techniques. The student is required to purchase videotape. 

Note: the department recommends that this course be taken at the 

same time as COMM 3580. 

Prerequisite: COMM 3505. 

Post-Production 

COMM 3530 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This is an intensive course in film and video editing, as well as other 
post-production techniques. Course work includes practice in editing 
theory, sound effects recording, narration recording, and multi-track 
sound mixing. The course is based on the use of AVID non-linear 
editors. Students are required to provide their own video tapes. 

Prerequisite: COMM 3540 or COMM 3740 or permission of the Instructor. 



Advanced Video Production 

COMM 3540 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

An upper-level production oriented course provides the opportunity 
for students to produce work of professional quality. This course 
draws on the skills of all previous courses in production. Working in 
production groups, students write, shoot, and begin editing a high- 
quality video program. Students may choose documentary, 
experimental, corporate, or dramatic subjects for this production. 
The final edit is completed on non-linear AVID systems. Student are 
required to purchase all production materials. 

Prerequisite: COMM 3520 and COMM 3740. 

Production Management 

COMM 3550 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course provides an examination of the fundamentals of 
production management. Topics covered in the class are: production 
budgets, production scheduling, contracts and agreements, union 
regulations for actors and crew members, shooting permits, legal 
implications and financial structures. 

Prerequisite: COMM 3520 or COMM 3720. 

Sound Design 

COMM 3560 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course examines the elements of post-production sound design 
within the context of film and video production. This course blends 
the artistic and the technical. Students will use nonlinear editors, 
digital audio work stations and digital recording equipment to design 
soundtracks for their film and video productions. All materials are the 
responsibility of the student. 

Prerequisite: COMM 3520 or COMM 3710. 

Lighting 

COMM 3580 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course provides an introduction to the techniques of lighting, 

both on location and in the studio. Topics covered in the class 

include: the use of lighting instruments,- lighting control media and 

devices, location lighting techniques, studio lighting techniques,- 

camera movement, composition, metering,- the use of lenses, electrical 

and safety considerations, grip techniques and equipment Students 

are required to purchase video tape. 

Note: The department recommends that students take this course 

simultaneously with either COMM 3520 or COMM 3710. 

Prerequisite: COMM 3505. 

Photography I 

COMM 3600 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course introduces technical and aesthetic aspects of 
photography, such as exposure techniques, film, paper, and basic 35 
mm camera work Students are responsible for all paper, film, 
supplies, and mounting materials. 

Photography II 

COMM 3610 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course is a continuation and refinement of the material covered 
in COMM 3600. Editing and sequencing along with filters, flash, fill- 
flash, and an introduction to the studio is covered. 

Prerequisite: COMM 3600. 

Photography III 

COMM 3620 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course introduces medium format photography. Lighting, 

portraiture, and commercial photography are explored in 

professionally designed studios. Students are responsible for all paper, 

film, and chrome processing. 

Prerequisite: COMM 3610. 

Large Format Photography 

COMM 3630 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course specializes in 4 x 5 photography and the use of the Zone 

System for exposure and development. Students are responsible for 

all paper and film supplies. 

Prerequisite: COMM 3610. 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Color Photography 

COMM 3640 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course introduces the basic theory of color photography. 
Printing is emphasized and all work is C-prints and chromes. 

Prerequisite: COMM 3610. 

Digital Photography 

COMM 3645 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course studies the fundamentals of digital image acquisition, 

scanning, image manipulation, and various output devices. 

Prerequisite: COMM 3620 or 3640 or permission of Instructor. Fulfills 

computer literacy requirement 

Photo Management 

COMM 3660 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course studies photographic space design for private, 

commercial, and educational use. The class promotes an 

understanding of flow, function, equipment inventory, record 

keeping, and budget control. 

Prerequisite: COMM 3610. 

Photography Seminar 

'COMM 3690 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The seminar provides an opportunity for advanced study in the 

medium. Students are responsible for all paper and film supplies. 

Prerequisites: COMM 3620, 3630, or 3640. 

Intermediate Film Production 

COMM 3710 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

Intermediate Film Production introduces the tools of professional 

motion picture production. Topics include: 16mm sync camera 

operation, lens and filter differentiations, camera support, shooting 

tests of several film emulsions, film laboratory procedures, use of sync 

sound equipment (Nagra and DAT) and AVID nonlinear editing. 

Note: the department recommends that this course be taken at the 

same time as COMM 3580. 

Prerequisite: COMM 3505. 

Advanced Film Production 

COMM 3720 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course provides an advanced examination of professional 16mm 

production and AVID nonlinear post-production techniques. Topics 

covered in the class include: location shooting, sound recording and 

editing, film editing, negative matching, and interlock mixing. 

Students produce a professional 16mm film during the course. Film 

and processing costs are shared by all students. 

Prerequisite: COMM 3710 and COMM 3740. 

Directing Video/ Film 

*C0MM 3730 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course examines the role of the director. Topics covered in the 
class include: script analysis and breakdowns, casting, blocking the 
camera and the actors, acting, and directing actors. The class focuses 
on the relationships between the director and producer, actor, writer, 
and editor as well as between the director and the cinematographer. 
The role of the assistant director is defined, and unions, talent 
agencies, schedule planning, and interpersonal communications are 
explored. Students are responsible for all materials. 

Prerequisites: COMM 3510 or COMM 3710 and COMM 3580. 

Digital Production for Film and Video 

COMM 3740 3cr.3hr. A 

In this course students may shoot 16mm film, video, or digital 

formats. Topics covered in the class include: techniques for shooting 

film for video, telecine techniques,- resolving sound to video tape, 

time code fundamentals, editing video tape, understanding paintbox, 

digital effects, and other post-production techniques, and preparing 

to edit non-linear on the AVID system. Students are required to 

purchase film and video tape, as well as processing telecine services. 
Prerequisite: COMM 3710 or 3520. Fulfills computer literacy requirements. 



Cinematography 

COMM 3750 3 cr. 3 hr. 

Cinematography is an advanced elective for film and video students 
who wish to specialize in the specific elements of production related 
to cinematography. This course is a blend of the artistic and the 
technical. Aspects of the topic include: film stock, laboratories, 
lenses, lighting, cameras, composition, camera angles, continuity, 
color, and special processes. The relationship between the 
cinematographer and other members of the production team as well 
as the structure of feature film camera departments will be examined. 
Prerequisite-. COMM 3710 Intermediate Film production. 

Graphic Design I 

COMM 3810 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course provides a basic introduction to the design process and 
the principles of design. Emphasis will be placed on problem solving 
and relating graphic design to communication. Students will be 
introduced to tools and equipment used in the field while working on 
layout and creative conceptualization. Students are responsible for all 
graphic supplies. (Credit is not given for both COMM 3810 and IT 
2520.) 

Graphic Design II 

COMM 3820 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

By using a problem solving approach to graphic design, students 

learn advanced graphic design principles. Students design and 

prepare highly finished comprehensive layouts. Projects include 

Marker Layout, Typography, Publication Design, Poster Design, 

and Corporate Identity. Problems are approached and solutions 

reached through teamwork. Projects are evaluated through joint 

critique. Students are responsible for all graphic supplies. 

Prerequisite: COMM 3810. 

Graphic Design III 

COMM 3830 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

By concentrating on technical and creative illustration, students 

have an opportunity for advanced study in graphic design. Students 

work in various media, including pen and ink, water color, marker, 

and colored pencil. Students are responsible for all illustration 

supplies. 

Prerequisite: COMM 3820. 

Graphic Management 

COMM 3840 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course studies the practices of advertising, sales, and marketing 

management in business, industry, and education. Emphasis is placed 

on the graphic designer in the role of creative art director, production 

manager, and designer illustrator. Topics of study include careers in 

graphic design and portfolio design and preparation. 

Prerequisite: COMM 3820. 

Publication Design 

COMM 3850 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course examines all aspects of publ 
designing with type, layout, 
combining photography and 
illustration with text, and print 
production. Students employ these 
skills in the design of newsletters, 
booklets, magazines, book and web 
page design. Portfolio quality pieces 
are produced in this advanced level 
course. Students are responsible for 
all graphic supplies. 

Prerequisites: COMM 3820, 3890. 




ication design including 
Key to Course Offerings 

Q: designates courses in the 
Quantitative Scientific Cluster 

I: the Ideas and Events Ouster 

B: the Human Behavior Cluster 

L: the Literature, Language 
and Arts Cluster 

C: Multicultural 

IDIS: Interdisciplinary courses 

Multicultural and inttrdisciplmary courses also 

juljiH a cluster designation. 

* Asterisk indicates that the course may 
be offered less than once even/ two years. 

A Undergraduate Day School 

• Undergraduate Evening School 

Courses having a more narrow focus than 
those taught on a regular basis or courses 
being taught on an experimental basis can 
be taught as Topics" courses. These courses 
will be assigned numbers based on the 
student level for which they are intended — 
first, second, third or fourth year. 



Writing for Business and Technology 

COMM 3860 3 cr. 3 hr. A 9 

The course is for students interested in writing in the business, 
industry, and management context. Topics covered in the class are: 
business correspondence, description of process and mechanisms, 
sets of instructions, proposals, abstracts, and reports. (Credit is not 
given for both COMM 3860 and ENGL 3860.) 

Feature and Magazine Writing 

COMM 3870 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course examines writing feature articles for newspapers, 
magazines, and trade journals. (Credit is not given for both COMM 
3870 and ENGL 3870.) 

Typography 

COMM 3880 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course is designed to teach the fundamentals of typography. 

Students will create projects that will enhance their knowledge of 

professional layout and design programs while paying special 

attention to the subtleties of typography. Comparison will be made 

between preparing simple and complex files for print. Students are 

responsible for all graphic supplies. 

Prerequisite: COMM 3820, 3890. 

Computer Graphic Design 

COMM 3890 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course introduces the techniques and tools utilized in electronic 

media to create, manipulate, and organize the graphic image. This 

course demonstrates present and future applications of electronically 

generated images as they relate to the graphic designer. Students 

have hands-on experience with computer graphics and electronic 

publishing hardware and software Students are responsible for all 

supplies. 

Prerequisite: COMM 3820. Fulfills computer literacy requirements. 

Graphic Design Photography 

COMM 3900 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course covers the commercial applications of photography, 

including product presentation, advertising, illustration, promotion, 

and publication photography. Students learn the role of the designer 

as a photographer who solves assigned problems using various 

techniques including digital photo and image manipulation Students 

are responsible for all graphic supplies. 

Prerequisites: COMM 3600, 3820. 

Graphic Arts Production 

COMM 3910 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course examines the skills necessary to produce printed 

products. Students complete projects with electronic page layout 

programs, operate process cameras, prepare printing plates, precisely 

match ink colors, and print their projects. The very important 

relationship between the designer and the commercial printer is 

emphasized. (Credit is not given for both COMM 3910 and ITEC 

1500.) 

Prerequisite: COMM 3810 or permission of Instructor. 

Advanced Computer Graphic Design 

COMM 3920 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This is an advanced course in computer graphics covering 

application of electronically generated images as they relate to the 

graphic designer and the use of computer graphics work stations. 

Topics of study include: digital typography, illustration, electronic 

publishing, and digital photography. Students are responsible for all 

supplies. 

Prerequisites: COMM 3820, 3890 or permission of the Instructor. 



Two-Dimensional Motion Graphics 

COMM 3940 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course investigates the processes involved in choreographing 
and producing animated two-dimensional images and typography. 
Students demonstrate a variety of techniques including frame-by- 
frame animation, keyframe interpolation and animation compositing 
using Adobe and Macromedia software. Assignments explore 
storyboarding, "four-dimensional" typography, vector-based 
animation, animated illustration and digital video for multimedia and 
World Wide Web presentation. 

Prerequisites: COMM 3810, 3890. 

Motion Design 

COMM 3945 

This course investigates the design and choreography of two- 
dimensional animated images and typography. Students demonstrate 
a variety of techniques that are used in industry-standard motion 
graphics software including frame-by-frame animation, interpolation, 
and compositing. Assignments explore storyboard creation, kinetic 
typography, animated illustration, and vector-based animation for 
digital presentation. 

Prerequisites: COMM 3880 and COMM 3890. 

Human Communications 

COMM 4200 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course provides for the study of human communication 
theories, concepts, contexts, and skills with the intent of developing 
an understanding of everyday interaction. Through the study of 
human communication theory, students will develop the vocabulary 
and concepts to evaluate communication practices. The class pays 
particular attention to achieving self-presentation and relational skills 
that apply to a variety of social contexts students encounter. Class 
discussion, activities, and assignments are designed to develop both 
knowledge and competencies necessary to understand the 
relationship between communication patterns and social order. 

Prerequisite: junior status 

Seminar in Communication Theory 

COMM 4205 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The seminar provides detailed and extensive study of 
communication theories, particularly interpersonal and mass 
communication theories. 

Instructional Training Design 

COMM 4210 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course examines instructional communications as they apply to 

selected learning theories and various instructional approaches or 

methods. Strong emphasis is given to the application of learning 

theories to interactive technologies. 

Prerequisite: junior status. 

Organizational Communication 

COMM 4220 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course is designed to introduce students to contemporary 
concepts about organizational communication functions, the structure 
of organizational communication systems and organizational levels at 
which communication occurs. Student research and field study will 
consist of a communications audit of a selected organization and the 
analysis at the related human, hardware, and software interfacing. 

Prerequisite: junior status. 

Communications Law and Ethics 

COMM 4230 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course provides an introduction to communications law and 

media ethics that raise important issues for all students in the 

Communications/Media department. Topics discussed in the class are: 

copyright law, libel, censorship, cable and broadcast law, privacy, and 

the U.S. legal process. 

Prerequisite: junior status. 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Media Criticism 

COMM 4240 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

In the context of film and video work, students examine several 

approaches to evaluating media, including political, cultural, social, 

genre, and feminist. 

Prerequisite: junior status. 

Research Seminar 

COMM 4250 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The seminar provides an opportunity to explore and learn various 
research methodologies, such as archival research, content analysis, 
and field study. The seminar is offered with various focuses, 
depending upon student and Instructor need and interest. 

Prerequisite: junior status. 

Advanced Professional Study 

'COMM 4260 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This interdisciplinary production course combines the talents of 

students from two or more concentrations. Students learn to work in a 

production team with a client to produce professional quality video, 

film, slide-tape, print, graphic, and/or interactive materials. 

Prerequisite: completion of five courses within a concentration. 

Pre-Press Production 

COMM 4270 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

Students need a bridge between design and the complex world of 
printing. File preparation for print reproduction will be stressed in this 
comprehensive, advanced level course. Printing terminology, job 
specification, file formatting, bid writing, color proofing, trouble 
shooting electronic documents, and mechanical press related 
problems are studied. 

Prerequisite: COMM 3820, 3890. 

intercultural Communication 

COMM 4280 3 cr. 3 hr. 

In this course we will explore intercultural communication through 
communication theory that differs from other social science 
disciplines. The course will equip students with tools to understand 
and think about intercultural communication methods so they may 
develop the skills to call upon in episodes of intercultural interaction. 
Students will work through a range of theoretical, methodological, 
descriptive, and interpretive critical readings to reach the goal of 
understanding the multiple perspectives and theories of intercultural 
communication. 

Prerequisites: COMM 1105 and COMM 1120. 

internship 

COMM 4880 12 cr. 36 hr. A • 

This full semester on- or off-campus Internship requires fifteen 
thirty-six-hour weeks of work. Communications/Media majors 
apply their knowledge and skills to the practical solution of 
communications problems. 

Prerequisites: completion of all preceding Communications/Media Phases 

with a cumulative Communications/Media Grade Point Average of 2.5 or 

better at the time the Application for Internship is due. Approval by 

Communications/Media Interview Committee and Department Chairperson. 

Students must complete an internship program in the semester prior to a 

planned internship. This program includes the student's presentation of a 

portfolio of work to be evaluated and approved by the Internship Committee. 

Independent Study 

COMM 4901 1 cr. 3 hr. A 

COMM 4902 2cr.6hr. A 

COMM 4903 3 cr. 9 hr. A 

COMM 4906 6 cr. 18 hr. A 

The Independent Study provides an opportunity for highly self- 
motivated students to explore areas of Communications/Media not 
provided within the departmental curriculum. Research methodology 
is to be used and a written monograph is to be presented to the 
faculty sponsor. Approval of a faculty sponsor, consent of the advisor, 
and permission of the Chairperson is required. 



Field Study 

COMM 4940 3 cr. 9 hr. A 

COMM 4950 6 cr. 18 hr. A 

The Field Study provides an experience that permits students to 
develop the knowledge and skills acquired in the classroom. A 
portfolio of the work completed is to be presented to the faculty 
sponsor. Approval of a faculty sponsor, sanction of a site supervisor, 
consent of the advisor, and permission of the Chairperson is required 

Directed Study 

COMM 4975 1-6 cr. A 

Computer Information Systems 

See course offerings under 
Business or Computer Science. 

Computer Science 

All Computer Science Electives 
must be at or above CSC 3000 level. 

Introduction to Programming 

CSC 1000 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

This course provides an opportunity to learn a higher-level 
language, to gain experience in the design, coding and utilization of 
computer programs, and to develop simple applications using a 
graphical user interface. Q 

Co-requisite: Passing the Math placement exam or Math 0200. 

Internet Communications 

CSC 1050 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

The Internet plays a crucial role in the information revolution. It is 
used increasingly for personal and business communications, for 
commerce and exchange of ideas, and as a source of information and 
entertainment. This course introduces the student to various 
components of the Internet such as the web, email, discussion groups, 
ftp, telnet etc. Tools and techniques for efficient web browsing will be 
taught. Security issues involved in using the Internet will be discussed. 
Students will design simple web pages and publish them on the 
Internet. 

Computer Applications 

CSC 1100 3cr.3hr. ▲• 

This is an introductory level study of the computer and application 

software techniques. This course introduces microcomputer concepts, 

common operating system functions, Internet, email and an 

integrated package of application software, including word 

processing, spreadsheet, database and presentation development. The 

student learns how to construct and edit a document, spreadsheet, 

database and presentation using the 

proper tools. Q 

Co-requisite: Passing the Math placement 
exam or Math 0200. 

Basics of Web Design 

CSC 1150 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

This course is about creating web 
pages using the latest version of 
HTML. The course covers the basics 
of HTML code. Students will learn 
to work directly with HTML tags to 
create forms, frames and cascading 
sheets, and to embed music and other 
multimedia. 
Prerequisite: CSC 1050 or permission from 
department. 



Key to Course Offerings 

Q: designates courses in the 
Quantitative Scientific Cluster 

I: the Ideas and Events Ouster 

B: the Human Behavior Cluster 

L: the Literature, Language 
and Arts Cluster 

C Multicultural 

IDIS: Interdisciplinary courses 

Multicultural and interdisciplinary courses also 

fulfill a cluster designation 

* Asterisk indicates that the course may 
be offered less than once every two years. 

A Undergraduate Day School 

• Undergraduate Evening School 

Coutses having a more narrow focus than 
those taught on a regular basis or courses 
being taught on an experimental basis can 
be taught as Topics" courses These courses 
will be assigned numbers based on the 
student level for which they are intended — 
first, second, third or fourth year. 



introduction to Spreadsheets and Databases 

CSC 1300 3 cr. 3 hr. ▲ • 

This course introduces the student to spreadsheets and databases. 

The student becomes proficient in the use of spreadsheets and 

databases as well as in the use of built-in functions for business, 

family etc. Q 

Co-requisite: Passing the Math placement exam or Math 0200. 

Computer Information Systems 

CSC 1400 3 cr. 3 hr. ▲ • 

This course is an introduction to concepts in computer information 
systems. Students learn how information technology is used in 
business. Topics covered include use of information systems in 
business, basics of hardware, software, networks and data 
management, use of productivity software, security and ethical use 
of information systems, business decision systems, and developing 
and managing information systems. A working knowledge of word 
processing, spreadsheet, and presentation software is required Q 
Co-requisite: Passing the Math placement exam or Math 0200, and CSC 
1100 or BSAD 1700 or equivalent knowledge. 

Computer Science I 

CSC 1500 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

This course introduces Computer Science by using a high-level 

programming language. Students will be taught to design programs 

and implement them using object-oriented programming techniques. 

This course provides a solid background for further studies in 

Computer Science by preparing students to enroll in the more 

specialized high-level software courses. Q 

Prerequisite: Passing the Math placement exam or Math 0200. 

Computer Science II 

CSC 1550 3 cr. 3 hr. ▲ • 

This course builds on the concepts covered in Computer Science I. 
Topics covered include inheritance, polymorphism, recursion, 
advanced GUI programming, exception handling, and input/output 
handling Students use integrated development environment to 
create, compile, run and debug programs Q 

Prerequisite: CSC 1500. 

Introduction to Electronics 

CSC 1600 4cr.5hr. ▲• 

This course provides an introduction to analog circuits and modern 
solid-state devices, including diode rectifiers, power supply design, 
OP amps, and oscillator circuits. Extensive laboratory work illustrates 
the operation and behavior of circuits, as well as the use of modern 
laboratory test equipment. Topics covered in the class include basic 
circuit analysis, semiconductor principles, diodes, power supply 
design, bipolar and FET transistor applications, OP AMP circuits and 
applications, oscillators, and linear integrated circuits. Students 
registering for this course must also register for the accompanying 
Lab course. 

Prerequisite: Math 1300. 

Digital Electronics 

CSC 1650 4cr.5hr. ▲• 

This course provides a study of the design and application of both 
asynchronous and synchronous electronic logic circuits. Counters, 
registers, serial and parallel adders, and arithmetic units are included. 
Topics covered are: Boolean algebraic simplifications, Karnaugh maps, 
Quine McCluskey method, combinational logic circuits, sequential 
logic circuits, comparison of TTL, MOS, ECL logic families, the 
arithmetic unit, coding and decoding, parity detection and 
generators, multiplexers and programmable logic devices Extensive 
laboratory work supplements the topics studied. Students registering 
for this course must also register for the accompanying Lab course. 

Prerequisite: CSC 1600. 



Discrete Mathematics 

CSC 1900 3 cr. 3 hr. ▲ • 

This course introduces discrete mathematics as applied to computer 

science. Topics covered include Boolean logic, elementary set theory, 

functions, relations, enumeration, proof techniques, number systems 

and trees. Q (Credit is not given for both CSC 1900 and MATH 

1900.) 

Prerequisite: Math 1250 or Math 1300 or equivalent knowledge. 

Advanced Web Design with Scripting 

CSC 2150 3 cr. 3 hr. • 

Scripting is used to add programming capabilities to HTML code 
and to create dynamic and more interactive web pages. Students will 
learn JavaScript as a scripting tool for creating web pages. 
Operators, statements, functions, event handling and objects of this 
language will be studied. Students will learn the document, form 
and window objects in detail 

Prerequisite: CSC 1150 or equivalent knowledge. 

Database Systems 

CSC 2400 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course is about design and implementation of database systems 
Evolution of various database models including hierarchical, relational 
and object-oriented models and the advantages of different models 
are studied. Use of Structured Query Language (SQL) in relational 
databases is explained and applied Students design databases 
applying E-R modeling and normalization techniques. 

Prerequisites: CSC 1550, and CSC 1900 or MATH 1900. 

Systems Programming 

CSC 2560 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

This course provides the student with the fundamentals of 

structured programming at the systems level. UNIX is used as a base 

for this course Students obtain a thorough knowledge of the C 

language, comfort in using the UNIX operating system and an 

appreciation for a systems approach to low-level programming 

tasks. Q 

Prerequisites: CSC 1550 and CSC 1900 or MATH 1900. 

Computer Organization 

CSC 2600 4cr.5hr. ▲• 

The purpose of this course is to provide a thorough discussion of the 

fundamentals of computer organization and architecture, and to relate 

these to contemporary computer design issues. After a brief review of 

the basic digital components used, the steps that a designer would go 

through in the design of an elementary systems are covered followed 

by a discussion of the organization and design of the central 

processing unit (CPU) and various control system implementations. 

The input/output and memory subsystems are included as is a brief 

discussion of multiprocessing systems, pipelining, and virtual memory. 

Students registering for this course must also register for the 

accompanying Lab course 

Prerequisite: CSC 1650. 

Business Programming 

CSC 2700 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course provides students with experience in the design and 
coding of programs using a business oriented language. Topics 
covered include structured programming techniques, data, record and 
file design,- sorting and merging of files, table handling,- variable- 
length records, indexed sequential access methods. File creation, 

updating and reporting is given special attention. 

Prerequisite: CSC 1550 

Web Programming with Java 

CSC 3050 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

There are three aspects to Web Programming: Front-end GUI 

programming, back-end Web or database server programming and 

the network programming to connect the two. In this course, 

students learn to use Java classes for creating applets, for server 

programming and for interfacing with a database. The course also 

reviews advanced concepts of object oriented programming, Java's 

exception handling, and multithreading. 

Prerequisite: CSC 2560. 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Operating Systems 

CSC 3100 3cr.3hr. ▲• 

This course examines the internal structure and operation of 

operating systems with an emphasis on their design criteria and 

approaches. Topics covered include: process management, 

scheduling, deadlock, memory management, virtual memory, 

protection and security and distributed systems. A working 

knowledge of a higher-level system programming language and 

computer data structures is assumed. 

Prerequisites: CSC 2560 and CSC 2600. 

Programming Languages 

CSC 3200 3cr.3hr. ▲• 

This course studies the hierarchy of programming languages starting 

with Assembly Language. It covers general principles of languages 

within imperative, object oriented and functional paradigms as well as 

logic programming. Students have an opportunity to learn the basic 

concepts and constructs of various programming frameworks and 

practice software design skills in languages like Ada, Lisp and/or 

Prolog. 

Prerequisite: CSC 2560 

Advanced Topics in Web Development 

CSC 3250 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

State of the art tools and technologies used in developing and 

deploying web pages will be studied. Server-side programming for 

database access will be studied. Students will create model 

applications used in e-commerce. 

Prerequisite: CSC 2150. 

Assembly Language 

CSC 3300 3cr.3hr. ▲• 

Assembly language provides the means for programming a 

computer at the most basic machine level. In this course, we explore 

the fundamental operations of a modern computer system using 

software tools. Topics examined include numerical and character 

representations, microprocessor register usage, machine instructions, 

addressing modes, input/output processing, parameter passing, 

interrupt processing and simple data structure realizations on the Intel 

80x86 processor. Q 

Prerequisite: CSC 1550 or permission from the department. 

Data Communications & Networking 

CSC 3400 3cr.3hr. ▲• 

Data communications is a subset of telecommunications involving 
the transmission of data to and from computers and components of 
computer systems. It is concerned with the transmission of data 
through some medium such as wire or fiber optic cable and includes 
coverage of the telephone system, local area networks and wide area 
networks. Concepts of concern are error control, data codes, signal 
representation and modulation techniques, protocols, reliability, and 
security. This course deals with both the hardware and software 
aspects of successful communication. 

Prerequisite: CSC 2560. 

Local Area Networks 

CSC 3450 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

This course examines local area network (LAN) technology and 
architecture both through general concepts and practical hands-on 
experience. All networking fundamentals are presented based on the 
modular approach of the ISO standards. Topics covered include file 
servers, configurations and protocols, installation and management of 
server hardware and software, system monitoring, maintenance and 
troubleshooting. Due to its importance, the TCP/IP protocol will be 
stressed. 

Prerequisite: CSC 2560. 



Object Oriented Programming 

CSC 3500 3 cr. 3 hr. ▲ • 

This course covers the fundamental principles of Object Oriented 

Paradigm 

It studies the concepts of Procedural and Data Abstraction, Classes, 

Inheritance, Polymorphism, Virtual Functions, Templates, Exception 

Handling, File Manipulations. Students learn the main tools of a 

popular language supporting the object-oriented framework and 

various techniques of object-oriented design. 

Prerequisite: CSC 2560. 

Windows Programming with MFC 

CSC 3550 3cr.3hr. ▲ 

This course is about developing Win32 applications using Microsoft 
Foundations Classes and Windows API. Topics include Menus, 
Controls, Dialog Boxes, Property Sheets and Document/View 
Architecture. 

Prerequisites: CSC 3500. 

Microprocessors 

CSC 3600 4cr.5hr. ▲• 

The course provides a detailed study of the microprocessor and its 
applications. Emphasis is placed on a current microprocessor, its 
hardware and software and its associated family of integrated circuits. 
Students design a microprocessor system, configuring the random 
access memory, the read-only memory, and peripheral devices using 
peripheral interface adapters. Students reinforce theory with extensive 
laboratory work. Students registering for this course must also register 
for the accompanying Lab course. 

Prerequisite: CSC 2600. 

Algorithms and Data Structures 

CSC 3700 3 cr. 3 hr. ▲ • 

This course provides an introduction to modern study of computer 
algorithms and complex data structures. It explores the logic of 
algorithmic analysis and design as well as practical utility and 
implementation techniques. The basic ideas from Complexity Theory 
will help students understand the concept of efficiency of algorithms 
and its role in the design of algorithms. The analysis of data structures 
is focused on the concepts of linked list, queues, stacks and trees. 
Various programming techniques such as divide and conquer, 
dynamic programming and backtracking are presented. 

Prerequisite: CSC 2560. 

Systems Analysis Methods 

CSC 3710 3cr.3hr. A* 

As an overview of the system development life cycle, this course 

introduces the student to the fundamental concepts and techniques of 

systems analysis. Classical and structured methods of systems 

documentation are explored as well as information gathering and 

reporting activities. 

Prerequisites: CSC 3450. 

Compiler Construction 

CSC 4200 3 cr. 3 hr. ▲ 

The course studies the techniques 

involved in the analysis of source 

language code and the generation of 

efficient object code. The focus is 

more on the front end of the 

compiler (analyzer) than it is on the 

back end (generator). By working in 

small project teams students modify 

an existing compiler. Topics covered 

in the class include: language 

definition, lexical, syntactic, and 

semantic analysis, and code 

generation. 

Prerequisite: CSC 2600. 




Key to Course Offerings 

Q: designates courses in the 
Quantitative Scientific Cluster 

I: the Ideas and Events Ouster 

B: the Human Behavior Cluster 

L: the Literature, Language 
and Arts Cluster 

C: Multicultural 

IDIS: Interdisciplinary courses 

Multicultural and interdisciplinary counts also 

fulfill a cluster designation. 

* Asterisk indicates that the course may 
be offered less than once every two years. 

▲ Undergraduate Day School 

• Undergraduate Evening School 



Courses having a more narrow focus than 
those taught on a regular basis or courses 
being taught on an experimental basis can 
be taught as Topics" courses. These courses 
will be assigned numbers based on the 
student level for which they are intended — 
first, second, third or fourth year. 



Software Engineering 

CSC 4400 3cr.3hr. ▲• 

This course examines main features of software life cycle. It covers 

the main issues in design creation, principles of programs 

verification, system testing and evaluation criteria. This course 

provides students with an opportunity to obtain practical experience 

in software design using CASE tools. Students work in project 

teams and apply principles of software design, verification, testing 

and coding toward the solutions of assigned problems 

Prerequisite: CSC 2560. 

Database Programming 

CSC 4550 3cr.3hr. ▲• 

Many businesses, small and large, utilize user- interfaces to access 
databases to provide security as well as multiple user access to the 
databases. This course will introduce the student to software 
components designed for database programming in a higher-level 
language. Each student works on a project of applied nature that 
involves documenting the requirements of a database, creating the 
database, and designing the user-interface to access the database. 
Working knowledge of the host language is required. 

Prerequisites: CSC 2400 and permission from the Instructor. 

Digital Signal Processing 

CSC 4600 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

DSP has found it way into a number of applications including 
communications and controls, graphics, and speech and image 
processing. DSP is concerned with real time signal processing where 
timing is of the utmost importance. This course will help students 
understand time and frequency domain descriptions of signals and 
systems. Linear time invariant systems, convolution, difference 
equations, and various mathematical transforms. (Fourier, Fast Fourier 
and z-transform) are introduced to describe and design both recursive 
and non-recursive digital filters DSP processor fundamentals, 
architectures and special features will be introduced using a particular 
processor in a lab environment. 

Prerequisite: CSC 2600 and MATH 2400. 

Systems Design & Implementation 

CSC 4700 3cr.3hr. ▲• 

This capstone course will emphasize the design and implementation 

phases of the system development life cycle using case studies. A 

problem solving approach will be used for students to learn strategy 

and techniques for dealing with complexities in Information Systems 

Development. 

Prerequisite: CSC 3710 

Independent Study 

CSC 4901, 4902, 4903 1, 2, 3 cr.A • 

The independent study provides an opportunity for highly motivated 
students to explore advanced areas of computer science not provided 
within the departmental curriculum. Approval of the faculty sponsor, 
consent of the advisor and permission of the Chairperson are 

required. 

Prerequisite: Completion of all the required 2000 level core courses with a 
Grade Point Average of 3.0 or more in those courses. 

Internship 

CSC 4940, 4950 3, 6 cr. ▲ • 

A 3-credit on- or off-campus internship requires 12 hours of work 

each week for fifteen weeks. Students apply their knowledge and 

skills to develop practical solutions to computer science or computer 

information systems problems. Approval by Department Chairperson 

is needed to register for this course. A written report on the work 

done in the format specified by departmental policy must be 

submitted to the chairperson to receive a grade. 

Prerequisite: Completion of all the required 2000 level core courses with a 
Grade Point Average of 3.0 or more in those courses. 



Directed Study 

CSC 4975 1-6 cr. A • 

A course in the departmental curriculum may be offered as directed 
study subject to the college policies and departmental policies. 
Approval of the faculty sponsor, consent of the advisor and 
permission of the Chairperson are required 

Prerequisite: Completion of all the required 2000 level core courses with a 
Grade Point Average of 3.0 or more in those courses. 



Criminal Justice 



Introduction to Criminal Justice 

CJ 2000 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course provides the student with an overview of the structure 
and organization of the criminal justice system. Emphasis is placed on 
the examination of the functions and decision processes of those 
agencies that deal with the management and control of crime and 
criminal offenders The course includes didactic presentations, 
assigned readings, class discussions, visiting practitioner lecturers, and 
small group discussions. 

Principles and Practices of Law Enforcement 

CJ 2050 3 cr. 3 Mrs A 

Students will examine the nature, history, role, operations and 
management of law enforcement agencies. Additional topics to be 
explored include police powers, investigations, use and abuse of 
police force, police corruption, crime prevention and the future of 
policing. 

Prerequisite: CJ 2000 

Introduction to Courts 

CJ 2100 3 cr. 3 hrs. A 

This course introduces students to the American system of criminal 
trail courts, including the functioning of the key actors in the 
courtroom-prosecutors, defense attorneys, judges, court clerks - and 
how the system functions at key decision points, including charging, 
bail, plea negotiations, trial and sentencing. We will also look at the 
role of courts within our larger political system. 

Prerequisite: CJ 2000 

Correctional Theory and Practice 

CJ 2350 3 cr. 3 hrs. A 

Corrections is the branch of the criminal justice system comprised of 

the programs, facilities and organizations responsible for the 

management of individuals who have been accused or convicted of 

criminal offenses. This course examines the history, operation, 

structure and clientele of modern correctional institutions and assesses 

the problems confronting them. The course also explores the 

relationships between corrections and social, political and economic 

trends within society. 

Prerequisite: CJ 2000 

Women in Criminal Justice 

CJ 2450 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course will examine the involvement of females in the criminal 

justice system, as victims, offenders, workers and professionals. 

Female criminality will be explored from varied perspectives. Students 

will undertake a systematic examination of the issues, biases and 

problems affecting the girls and women involved in this system, with 

attention focused on the effects of these factors on them, their 

relationships and their families. 

Prerequisite: CJ 2000 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Correctional Law 

CJ 2500 3 cr. 3 hrs. A 

Since the 1960s law has become an increasingly important 

accountability mechanism for corrections. Court decisions shaped 

the policies and practices in corrections institutions and, in some 

states, helped to transform prisons and jails into new organizational 

entities. This course seeks to help students understand how law 

affects the corrections environment, as well as examining current 

issues in corrections. 

Prerequisite: CJ 2000 



Race, Crime and the Law 

CJ 2560 3 cr. 3 hrs. A 

Arrest, conviction and incarceration rates for persons of color are 

generally acknowledged to be disproportionate. Is this the result of 

inequitable treatment by the criminal justice system, or are there 

other factors that may explain it? This course will review the 

empirical evidence available to answer this question and the ways in 

which researchers have attempted to frame these questions and 

analyze the results. 

Prerequisite: CJ 2000 

Juvenile Justice 

CJ 2600 3cr.3hr. A 

The course is designed to develop student awareness of past and 
contemporary philosophies, practices, and paradoxes of juvenile 
justice. The course examines the programmatic efforts designed for 
juveniles "in trouble with the law" and focuses on the relationships 
between the components of this system of justice. The content of the 
course is supplemented by current journal research, lectures, and 
panel discussions by practicing professionals, and a field-based class. 

Prerequisite: CJ 2000. 

Ethics in Criminal Justice 

CJ 2651 3cr.3hr. A 

This course will acquaint the student with the theoretical 
foundations essential to ethical decision making by introducing 
students to ethical theory, major ethical belief systems, and ethical 
issues in criminal justice. Students will develop awareness of and 
explore the major ethical issues/questions specific to each of the 
criminal justice subsystems,- in addition, the student will become 
familiar with and examine the ethical challenges and dilemmas that 
confront criminal justice professionals across the US system of 
justice. Strategies for responding to situations are considered and 
models of ethical decision making are examined. 

Prerequisite: CJ 2000. 

Criminal Law 

CJ 2550 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The focus of this course is the study of the general principles of 
criminal law. The approach adopted in this course involves the use of 
the text to explain general principles and their application to specific 
crimes followed by cases that apply the general principles to the facts 
of the specific cases. The students will be encouraged to formulate 
their own views regarding the application made by the court it its 
opinion on the one hand and, on the other, they will also be 
encouraged to understand the principles and definitions in order to 
apply them. Students will be required to act as legislators, judges, 
juries, defense attorneys and prosecutors in order to see the principles 
and definitions from all perspectives. I 

Prerequisite: CJ 2000. 

Domestic Terrorism and Hate Crime 

CJ 3000 3 cr. 3 hrs A 

From the Ku Klux Klan to Timothy McVeigh, a few Americans have 
sought to achieve their ends through violent action. This course 
introduces students to the variety of extremist groups within the 
United States and examines their history, nature, extent and danger- 
ousness. It also explores hate crime, a relatively new responsibility of 
the criminal justice system. We will look at the social construction 
of hate crime and issues concerning its enforcement. 

Prerequisite: CJ 2000 



International Terrorism 

CJ 3050 3 cr. 3 hrs. A 

This course applies an interdisciplinary approach to identify the 
contexts, origins, causes, patterns, trends, and explanations of 
international terrorism. Students will study terrorist organizations, 
their structure, financing, agenda, objectives, methodology, 
international links, and use of technology. They will also study anti- 
terrorist measures, state-sponsored terrorism, and emergency 
management as it affects terrorist incidents. 

Prerequisite: CJ 2000 

Organized Crime and Youth Gangs 

CJ 3100 3 cr. 3 hrs. A 

This course offers and overview of the nature and extend of 
organized crime, as well as the impact of organized crime on U.S. 
society, both in terms of economy and politics. The course then 
takes up contemporary youth gangs in the United States, concluding 
with policies programs addressing gangs (including law enforcement 
and prevention and intervention efforts). 

Prerequisite: CJ 2000 

Criminal Justice Research Methods 

CJ 3130 3 cr. 3 hrs A 

This course provides students with an understanding of how 
researchers use scientific methods to frame and explore issues 
important in criminal justice. The course focuses on methods of 
measuring crime, data collection, research design, sampling and 
probability, survey and questionnaire design, methods of observation 
and written communication of results Students will propose a 
research topic, conduct a literature search, write hypotheses, collect 
data, test their hypotheses, and analyze their results. 

Prerequisite: CJ 2000 

Criminal Justice Data Analysis 

CJ 3140 3 cr. 3 hrs. A 

This course explores the ways in which researchers use data analysis 
in criminal justice research. The course focuses on methods of 
analyzing crime, using secondary data such as the Uniform Crime 
Reports, National Crime Victimization Surveys, NIBRS, and other 
frequently-used datasets. The student is introduced to computer 
software packages, e.g., SPSS, to analyze data. Students will 
evaluate critically several studies, including their design, analysis of 
data, and conclusions. 

Prerequisite: CJ 2000 

White Collar and Corporate Crime 

CJ 3200 3 cr. 3 hrs. A 

This course introduces students to a variety of topics and issues in 

the area of white-collar and corporate crime. It examines and 

contrasts the treatment corporate and white-collar offending by the 

criminal justice and regulatory justice systems. It looks at 

definitional issues, the nature and extent of white-collar crimes, 

crime types, case studies and the etiology of offending. 
Prerequisite: CJ 2000 

Key to Course Offerings 

Q: designates courses in the 

Quantitative Scientific Ouster 
I: the Ideas and Events Ouster 
B: the Human Behavior Cluster 
L: the Literature, Language 

and Arts Ouster 
G Multicultural 
ID1S: Interdisciplinary courses 
Multicultural and interdisciplinary courses also 
fulfill a cluster designation. 

* Asterisk indicates that the course may 
be offered less than once every two years. 

▲ Undergraduate Day School 

• Undergraduate Evening School 

Gxirses having a more narrow focus than 
those taught on a regular basis or courses 
being taught on an experimental basis can 
be taught as Topics" courses. These courses 
will be assigned numbers based on the 
student level for which they are intended — 
first, second, third or fourth year. 




Community Based Corrections 

CJ/HMSV 3300 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course examines the philosophy of community-based 
corrections from historical, legal, social, and psychological 
perspectives. The essence of probation and parole and their 
administration are considered in conjunction with criminal justice 
issues and practices that affect the court's decision to allow 
community sanctions and supervision in lieu of incarceration. 
Contemporary trends and alternatives to traditional supervision are 
explored as well. A supervised practicum (20 hours per semester) is 
encouraged. 

Prerequisite: CJ 2000 

Comparative Justice Systems 

CJ 3525 3 cr. 3 hrs. A 

This course will focus on a comparative study of criminal justice 

systems in other nations with special reference to their structure, 

laws, procedures and processes. The course will also examine crime 

committed in other cultures and how criminals are punished and/or 

rehabilitated. 

Prerequisite: CJ 2000 

Colloquium 

CJ 3750 3 cr. 3 hrs. s 

This course seeks to integrate the student's earlier work on theories 
of crime, types of crime, prevention, program assessment, etc., while 
honing the student's research and writing skills. The course involves 
intensive writing exercises, critical reading exercises, and critical 
analysis of research projects. 

Prerequisite: CJ 2000. 

Internship in Criminal Justice 

CJ 4970 6cr. A 

CJ 4990 12 cr. 

Internship is the structured academic experience that allows Senior 
CJ students who have successfully met eligibility criteria, to 
integrate and apply the skills and theory of the discipline in a field- 
based setting. Such an experience helps the student develop an 
understanding of the effects of administrative practices and 
governing policies on the ability to carry out the responsibilities of 
his/her field placement. 

Students participate in Internship the supervision of qualified 
professionals in CJ organizations. 

In addition to the field experience, students participate in a weekly 
seminar held by the college's supervising professor. Here, students 
share their experiences and develop a heightened awareness of their 
roles in the organizations in which they are functioning. 

Students must have completed their prerequisites at least one 
semester before taking Internship and must pre-register with the Field 
Placement office in the beginning of the semester prior to the 
semester before they plan to enter an agency, (for example, students 
planning a fall placement must have completed their prerequisites by 
the end of the previous fall semester and pre-register with the 
Instructor early in the previous spring.) 

Students must meet CJ Internship eligibility requirement as 
determined by the Department of Behavioral Sciences. 

Additional course descriptions for the Criminal 
Justice major can be found in Human Services, 
Political Science, and Sociology. 

Introduction to Legal Process 

POLS 2270 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

Sex, Race and the Constitution 

POLS 2550 3cr.3hr. A 

Criminal Procedure: The Right of the Accused 

POLS 2700 3cr.3hr. A 

Constitutional Law 

POLS 3500 3cr.3hr. A 

Crisis Intervention 

HMSV 2400 3 cr. 3 hr. A 



Interviewing Techniques 

HMSV 2500 3 cr. 3 hr. 

Child Abuse and Neglect 

HMSV 3500 3 cr. 3 hr. 
Criminology 

SOC 2750 3 cr. 3 hr. 

Juvenile Delinquency 

SOC 2760 3 cr. 3 hr. 

Law and Society 

SOC 3500 3 cr. 3 hr. 



Early Childhood, Elementary, 
and Middle School Education 

Early Childhood Foundations 

EDUC 1100 4cr.5hr. A 

This course gives a brief orientation on the developmental 
philosophy and goals of early childhood education Students 
consider educational procedures used in facilitating the development 
of the child. They also explore the role of the teacher, the 
environment, and the appropriate instructional strategies to use with 
young children. The course is required of all Early Childhood 
majors. A pre-practicum is required. 

Behavioral Science in Early Childhood: Child Development 
and Observation 

EDUC 1600 4cr.5hr. A 

This course includes a study of principles, patterns, and theories of 

human development and learning as well as principles and techniques 

of naturalistic and standardized child study Observation, recording, 

synthesis, and interpretation of the behavior of young children occurs 

within a pre-practicum setting. Written case studies are required. This 

course is a requirement for Early Childhood majors. 

Prerequisite: General Psychology or Introduction to Psychology. 

Required for EDUC 3110. 

Reading in Early Childhood Education 

EDUC 2100 3cr.5hr. A 

The reading process and factors influencing the development of 

reading are examined. Pre-reading and reading skills are identified, 

and techniques for assessment of skills are presented. Methods and 

materials for teaching primary reading are discussed and illustrated. A 

pre-practicum is required. 

Prerequisite: EDUC 1600. 

Language Arts in Early Childhood Education 

EDUC 2200 3cr.5hr. A 

This course presents a timely and concise summary of important 
issues confronting the teacher and learner when developing a mastery 
of language arts in the Early Childhood Setting. The focus is on 
methodology related to the teaching of listening, speaking, reading, 
and writing. A pre-practicum is required. 

Fine Arts in Early Childhood Education 

EDUC 2400 4cr.5hr. A 

This course studies the integration of art, music, and movement into 

curricula for young children by using an interdisciplinary approach. 

Investigation of the objectives, methods, and materials in the fine arts 

is conducted. 

Prerequisite: EDUC 1100. 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Pre-Kindergarten Clinical 

EDUC 2500 4cr.Shr. A 

This course is designed for the student of Early Childhood 
Education who is interested in exploring early childhood prior to the 
Kindergarten and public school experience. The students investigate 
a variety of models and curriculum programs designed for infants, 
toddlers, and preschool-aged children. Further the student 
experiences a wide variety of pre- Kindergarten settings and explores 
the systems designed to create, administer, and evaluate such 
programs. 

Parent-Child Relations in Education 

EDUC 2700 3cr.Shr. A 

This course explores the role of the parent in the development of 
the child and how the parent relates to the educational system. This 
course stresses awareness of how parents stimulate the growth of 
behavioral trends in their children and how they can be useful as 
resources to improve the child's educational environment. 

Prerequisite: EDUC 1600 or PSY 2210. 

Principles and Practices in Education 

EDUC 2710 3cr.3hr. A 

This course includes an examination of the theoretical and practical 

knowledge of the teaching/learning process. Students demonstrate 

competencies in the areas of planning, curriculum design, and 

evaluation. Focus is placed on the needs and learning styles of the 

elementary school and middle school child and the instructional 

strategies used to meet those needs effectively. In addition, classroom 

management skills and techniques are emphasized. A pre-practicum is 

required. A portfolio assessment process is introduced in this course. 

Prerequisite: PSY 2210 or PSY 2230. 

Science in Education 

EDUC 2750 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

In this course contemporary elementary and middle school science 
methods, materials, courses of study and science texts are examined. 
Science teaching units are developed and demonstrated. A pre- 
practicum is required. 

Integrated Creative Arts Teacher Education Program 

*EDUC 2800 15 cr. 45 hr. A 

This is a full-semester experience which includes five weeks of 
classroom instruction and training in creative work in visual arts, 
language arts, movement, music, and integrating art forms. 
Subsequent to the initial training period, students are placed in field 
stations for classroom experiences for the remainder of the semester. 
While in the field stations, students assist teacher-specialists in one or 
more of the art form areas. They also develop and implement 
programs for the specific classroom and its pupils so as to foster the 
pupils' personal expression through creation in the arts. A weekly 
seminar on Wednesday afternoons from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. is held at 
the College for the purpose of workshop experiences and problem 
solving. Students are visited and evaluated regularly by College 
faculty as well as by cooperating teacher-specialists in the schools. 
Students are expected to be present in the school throughout the 
semester. 

Caring for Infants and Toddlers 

EDUC 2900 4cr.6hr. A 

This course assists students in the development of attitudes, 
knowledge, and skills important to understanding and supporting the 
interactions of infants and toddlers. 

Language Arts in Education 

EDUC 3010 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course provides students with an introduction to the nature of 
language and language growth. Emphasis is placed on the meaning 
and importance of language arts as well as on the characteristics of 
elementary and middle school age children, which affect and are 
affected by the language arts program. Elements of writing, speaking, 
listening, and reading are stressed A pre-practicum is required. 

Prerequisite: EDUC 2710. 



Teaching Mathematics 

EDUC 3020 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

Contemporary elementary and middle school mathematics 

standards, methods, and materials are examined in this course. 

Developmentally appropriate lessons and learning devices are 

refined and demonstrated. A pre-practicum is required. 

Prerequisite: Math competency Passing Score or Basic Math II. 

Reading in Education 

EDUC 3030 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course includes an examination of the reading process with 
emphasis on methods of evaluation and strategies for reading. 
Reading skills and procedures for developing these skills are 
examined, and current approaches to the teaching of reading are 
evaluated. The student is made cognizant of methods of grouping and 
evaluation procedures. A pre-practicum is required. 

Prerequisites: PSY 2210, EDUC 2710. 

Reading Diagnosis and Remediation 

*EDUC 3050 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course provides students with the competencies necessary to 
diagnose reading abilities and to develop reading proficiency in their 
future classrooms. Students are taught the skills needed to administer, 
score, and analyze Informal Reading Inventories. The student tests a 
child, plans a program of instruction for that child, and instructs the 
child based on the diagnosis and instructional plan Emphasis is also 
placed on the development and utilization of assessment strategies, 
instructional techniques, and instructional activities specific to the 
needs and interests of the child. 

Prerequisites: EDUC 2100 and EDUC 3030. 

Methods and Materials in Early Childhood Education 

'EDUC 3060 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course includes a hands-on workshop and exploration of all 
areas of the early childhood curriculum. As part of the exploration, 
students research and prepare games and devices appropriate to an 
early childhood classroom. This course serves as an elective for all 
education majors. 

Middle School Concept 

*EDUC 3070 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course introduces students to the historical development, 
philosophy, and the competencies needed to teach in the Middle 
School. Pre-practicum required. 

Prerequisite: PSY 2210 or PSY 2230. 

Science, Math, and Social Studies in 
Early Childhood Education 

EDUC 3100 4cr.5hr. A 

This course emphasizes the development and demonstration of 
instructional techniques and materials in science, math, and social 
studies, which are appropriate for heterogeneous groups of young 
children. A pre-practicum is required. 

Behavioral Science in Early Childhood II: 
Learning and Assessment 

EDUC 3110 4cr.5hr. A 

This course is a continuation of 
EDUC 21 10. (EDUC 2110 and 
EDUC 3110 cannot be taken 
simultaneously.) 

Curriculum and Instruction in 
the Middle School 

*E DUC 3300 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course introduces students to 
curriculum development, 
instructional competencies, and 
appropriate goals and objectives for 
the Middle School. A pre-practicum 
is required. 

Prerequisite: EDUC 3070. 



Key to Course Offerings 

Q: designates courses in the 
Quantitative Scientific Cluster 

I: the Ideas and Events Ouster 

B: the Human Behavior Cluster 

L: the Literature, Language 
and Arts Cluster 

C: Multicultural 

IDIS: Interdisciplinary courses 

Multicultural and interdisciplinary courses also 

fulfill a cluster designation 

* Asterisk indicates that the course may 
be offered less than once every two years. 

▲ Undergraduate Day School 

• Undergraduate Evening School 



Courses having a more narrow focus than 
those taught on a regular basis or courses 
being taught on an experimental basis can 
be taught as Topics" courses. These courses 
will be assigned numbers based on the 
student level for which they are intended — 
first, second, third or fourth year. 



Reading in the Middle School 

*EDUC 3400 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course imparts appropriate knowledge and competencies for 
reading at the Middle School level. 

Creative Arts in Education 

EDUC 3500 3cr.3hr. A 

The course explores materials and processes of children's perception 
and behavior with emphasis aimed at encouraging the development 
of their critical and creative potential 

Prerequisite: EDUC 2710. 

Social Studies in Education 

EDUC 3600 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course equips the future teacher with the knowledge, teaching 

strategies, and sequential course development necessary to teach 

Social Studies at the elementary and middle school level. A pre- 

practicum is required. 

Prerequisites: EDUC 2710, EDUC 3030. 

Reading in the Content Areas 

EDUC 3640 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course includes discussion of the role of content reading in 

elementary and middle school classrooms, textbook evaluation and 

quantitative/qualitative evaluation procedures, reflections on being a 

content learner, and the development and practice of strategies for 

learning from textbooks, including vocabulary, comprehension, and 

study skills. 
Prerequisite: EDUC 3010 or EDUC 3030 (for Elementary and Middle School 

majors). 

Using Computers in Classrooms 

EDUC 3700 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

Students examine the philosophy, theory, and application of 
computers in classrooms. A significant portion of class time is devoted 
to "hands on" experiences with computers. These experiences include 
programming in text and graphics mode, introducing and using 
LOCO, using printers, using the Internet for research, integrating 
computers and other technologies in teaching content area subjects, 
developing programs designed to enhance the learning abilities of 
children, and evaluating educational software. Prior experience using 
computers is not assumed. Q 

Analysis of Reading Problems 

EDUC 4000 3cr.3hr. A 

The course examines the correlates of reading problems Students 
learn to identify principles of diagnosis, and analyze, administer, and 
interpret formal diagnostic tests. Students demonstrate competency in 
preparing a case study report. 

Prerequisite: EDUC 2100 or EDUC 3030. 

Foundations Seminar 

EDUC 4010 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course covers an examination of the historical perspectives and 

philosophical orientation in the field of elementary and middle school 

education Specific attention is given to an analysis of current issues 

and programs in social foundation, legal foundation, curricular 

patterns, and pluralism in Education. 

Prerequisite: EDUC 2710. 

Senior Seminar in Early Childhood 

EDUC 4050 3 cr. 5 hr. A 

This course covers an examination of the historical perspectives and 
philosophical orientations in the field of early childhood education 
Specific attention is given to an analysis of current issues and 
programs. For senior practicum students only. 



Introduction to Bilinguai Education 

EDUC 4150 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course provides an overview of the theory, research and 
practice of bilinqual education Historical constructs, current 
theories, and the philosophy of bilingual biculturalism will be 
emphasized Basic concepts of bilingualism, state, and nation 
initiatives, politics and legislative mandates regarding bilingual 
education will be discussed. Familial, cultural, developmental and 
diverse learning abilities as they relate to the bilingual children will 
also be explored. 

Theories of Language and Second Language Acquisition 

EDUC 4200 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course introduces current theoretical models of language 
acquisition focusing on literacy development and developing 
language skills. It is designed to provide students with an overall 
understanding of the importance of language development and 
language acquisition as seen in the education environment. Issues 
regarding first and second language development will be addressed. 
Students will focus on how theory and research relate to language 
instruction. 

Bilingual Teaching Methods and Strategies 

EDUC 4300 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course introduces students to the various theories and methods 
of teaching children from diverse linguistic backgrounds. The 
emphasis will be placed on approaches and methodologies in 
teaching both English and the child's native language. Teaching 
strategies for supporting language skills, assessment approaches and 
evaluation procedures to determine the needs of bilingual students 
will be provided. Children with diverse learning abilities within the 
bilingual setting will also be emphasized. 

Assessment and Evaluation of Bilingual Programs 

EDUC 4400 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course is designed to explore the assessment and evaluation 
systems in bilingual education programs. The focus will be on the 
federal, state, and local educational policies and assessment practices 
of students in terms of language acquisition, language skills, content 
knowledge, as well as the evaluation of curriculum materials and 
teaching methods Student progress, monitoring, developing and 
designing authentic assessment approaches, creating portfolios, as 
well as previewing, analyzing, and evaluating current bilingual 
assessment instruments will be included 

Bilingual Practicum 

EDUC 4500 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The practicum is designed for student teachers preparing for their 
certification, Teacher of Transitional Bilingual Education, Elementary 
Provisional with Advanced Standing. The students will be placed in 
bilingual classrooms at various grade levels (K-third grade) where 
they will be observing, assisting, and teaching under the supervision 
of a cooperating teacher. The students will also be attending, with 
their college supervisor regularly scheduled seminars (see Bilingual 
seminar) in which both Spanish and English will be presented. 

Bilingual Seminar 

EDUC 4600 1 cr. 1 hr. A 

The Bilingual Seminar is a complement and supplement to the 
Student Teaching Practicum in the bilingual classroom setting. 
Students will investigate the diversity of bilingual classroom settings, 
learning environments, curriculum approaches, teaching 
methodologies and teaching strategies as they relate to the bilingual 
child. Observation, journal writing and curriculum presentations and 
evaluations will be required. 

Teaching Writing in Middle and Secondary Schools 

EDUC 4700/ ENGL 4700 

This course provides practice and research in alternatives for teaching 
writing in secondary schools. Different approaches are explored 
through experiments for the teacher and opportunities to test these 
approaches are available in prepracticum experiences. A prepracticum 
is required. 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Introduction to Learning Disabilities 

*EDUC 4780 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course includes a study of some of the causes of school learning 
disabilities at the Elementary level. Specific techniques and 
remediation exercises are discussed. 

Practicum I and II in Early Childhood Education 

EDUC 4862, 4863 6cr.A 

For the Student Teaching Practicum in Early Childhood, students 

are assigned to cooperating schools for a semester of student 

teaching. 

Practicum in Elementary Education I and II 

EDUC 4882, 4883 6 cr. A 

Students are assigned to cooperating elementary schools for a 
semester of student teaching. 

Practicum in Middle School Education I and II 

EDUC 4885, 4886 6cr.A 

Students are assigned to cooperating middle schools for a semester 
of student teaching. 

Independent Study in Education 

EDUC 4903 3 cr. A 

This course provides students in early childhood, elementary, and 

secondary education with the opportunity to do research with staff 

guidance in a problem in education. The course is limited to juniors 

and seniors. 

Prerequisite: permission of Department. 

Directed Study 

EDUC 4975 1-6 cr. A 



Economics 



Introduction to Economics for Non-majors 

ECON 1050 3cr.3hr. A 

This course surveys the field of economics without the technical 
sophistication of a principles course. The emphasis is on real 
problems of competition and growth with examples of concepts 
drawn primarily from the experience of the U.S. economy in global 
perspective. I 

Principles of Economics: Macroeconomics 

ECON 1100 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

This course is a study of the theory of employment, income, and 

growth. Stabilization policy and current problems in American 

capitalism are emphasized. I 
Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of the College Mathematical Readiness 

requirement 

Principles of Economics: Microeconomics 

ECON 1200 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

Students examine the theory of the consumer and the business firm 
in this course. Efficiency in the allocation of resources is examined in 
four different market structures: pure competition, pure monopoly, 
monopolistic competition, and oligopoly. I 

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of the College Math Readiness 

requirement 

Consumer Economics 

ECON 1300 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course emphasizes theories of consumption and economic 
functioning with emphasis on demand, consumer problems, standards 
of living, policies for protecting consumers, and expanding 
consumption. I 

Comparative Economic Systems 

ECON 2200 3cr.3hr. A 

This course studies the different economic systems operational in 
the world today Emphasis is on differences between the various 
types of market capitalist and planning systems. I 

Prerequisite: ECON 1100. 



Industrial Organization 

ECON 2300 3cr.3hr. A 

This course integrates theory, empirical studies, and case studies to 
analyze the effects of government regulations on the structure and 
organization of US business firms. Several cases of antitrust legislation 
are studied. In addition the course shows how political and economic 
issues affect industrial organization. I 

Prerequisites: satisfactory completion of the College Mathematical Readiness 

requirement and ECON 1200. 

Money and Banking 

ECON 2400 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

This course focuses on the role of money, credit, and banking in the 
American economy. Special emphasis is placed on the applicability of 
monetary policy to the problems of economic stability. 1 

Prerequisite: ECON 1100. 

Human Resource Economics 

ECON 2450 3cr.3hr. A 

Labor market and employment analysis are the focus of this course, 
which covers the structure of labor markets, the education and 
training of the labor force, and manpower programs. The serious 
problems of unemployment, underemployment, discrimination, and 
barriers to job entry are also discussed. 

Prerequisites: ECON 1200 or ECON 1250. 

Economic Development 

ECON 2500 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course examines the problems of less developed countries. 
Topics of discussion include population, income growth, capital 
formation, unemployment, foreign investment and aid, the role of 
government, and international economics. I, C 

Prerequisite: ECON 1100. 

Urban Economics 

ECON 2550 3cr.3hr. A 

This course is a historical and economic explanation of the growth 

of cities as well as a theoretical analysis of their location, form, and 

economic structure. Current urban problems are also discussed. 

Prerequisites: ECON 1100, ECON 1200 or ECON 1250. 

Public Finance 

ECON 2600 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course studies the principle of governmental expenditures and 

revenues. Attention is also devoted to the problems of public debt, 

fiscal policy, and inter-governmental fiscal relations particularly in 

reference to the United States. I 

Prerequisites: ECON 1200. 

History of Economic Thought 

ECON 3000 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

Within the framework of understanding the relationship between 
history and economic thought, this course covers the work of the 
great economists. Starting with the roots of economic thought in the 
works of the mercantilists and physiocrats, the course turns to the 
giants in political economy, including Adam Smith, David Ricardo, 
Karl Marx, Alfred Marshall, and J. 
M. Keynes. 
Prerequisites: ECON 1100 and ECON 1200. 

International Economics 

ECON 3550 3cr.3hr. A 

This course explores the theories of 
international trade and their links to 
theories of economic development 
and growth Major current topics in 
the international economy, including 
economic competition among 
countries, debt problems in the Third 
World, and North-South relations, 
are treated as practical issues against 
which the theories can be tested. I 
Prerequisites: ECON 1100, ECON 1200. 




Key to Course Offerings 

Q: designates courses in the 
Quantitative Scientific Cluster 

I: the Ideas and Events Ouster 

B: the Human Behavior Cluster 

L: the Literature, Language 
and Arts Cluster 

C: Multicultural 

IDIS: Interdisciplinary courses 

Multicultural and interdisciplinary courses also 

juljill a cluster designation. 

* Asterisk indicates that the course may 
be offered less than once every two years. 

▲ Undergraduate Day School 

• Undergraduate Evening School 



Courses having a more narrow focus than 
those taught on a regular basis or courses 
being taught on an experimental basis can 
be taught as Topics" courses. These courses 
will be assigned numbers based on the 
student level for which they are intended — 
first, second, third or fourth year. 



International Finance 

E CON 3600 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course considers the theory and practice of financial 
management by governments, corporations, and individuals in a 
changing international monetary environment. The course also 
discusses the influence of central governments, central banks, and 
international monetary institutions on interest rates, exchange rates, 
capital flows and financial stability. I 

Intermediate Macroeconomics 

ECON 3650 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

As a second course and more advanced treatment of 
macroeconomics, this course provides a detailed examination of 
major topics in macroeconomics. Topics of discussion include 
theories of consumption, investment, and growth recession, as well 
as efforts by the government to stabilize the economy through 
fiscal, monetary, or other measures. This course introduces the 
Keynesian, neo-classical, and Marxian models of the macroeconomy. 
I 

Prerequisites: ECON 1100, ECON 1200. 

Intermediate Microeconomics 

ECON 3660 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course analyzes consumer and producer equilibrium in a 
market economy. The behavior of firms in the four market 
structures and the behavior of firms and individuals in input markets 
is examined Applications of economic theory to concrete economic 
problems are emphasized. I 

Prerequisites: satisfactory completion of the College Mathematical Readiness 

requirement, ECON 1200. 

Econometrics 

ECON 3700 3cr.3hr. A 

This course is an introduction to econometric methods, statistical 

inferences, and testing hypotheses. Model building techniques and 

their theoretical justifications are presented and evaluated in terms 

of their performance. Q 

Prerequisites: ECON 1100, ECON 1200, MATH 2200, MATH 2800 or 

permission of Instructor. 

Managerial Economics 

ECON 3750 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

Applied microeconomics or the application of economic theory and 

methodology to the practice of managerial decision making is the 

focus of this course. Case studies are emphasized in instruction. I 

Prerequisites: ECON 1100, ECON 1200, MATH 2200, MATH 2800 or 

permission of Instructor. 

Independent Study in Economics 

ECON 4900 3cr.3hr. A 

The Independent Study is open to students who have the permission 
of the supervising instructor and the department. Course of study, 
meetings, and credit are arranged with approval. 

Internship in Economics 

ECON 4940 12 cr. 3 hr. A 

The Internship provides work experiences in private or public firms. 
Students acquire skills useful to professional economists 

Prerequisites: junior or senior standing, 3.00 Econ. cum, or permission of 

internship coordinator. 

Directed Study 

ECON 4975 1-6 cr. A 



English 



Basic College Writing 

ENGL 0100 3 inst. cr. 3 hr. A 

This course studies the process of writing as well as sentence 
arrangements and punctuation patterns in Edited American English. 
Credits do not count towards graduation. 

Writing Skills Workshop 

ENGL 1000 1 cr. 3 hr. A 

An intensive study of the basic writing skills. This course cannot be 
taken simultaneously with Basic College Writing (ENGL 0100), 
Writing I or II (ENGL 1 100, 1 200). The class may be taken 3 times 
for I credit per semester. 

Reading Improvement I 

ENGL 1010 1 cr. 3 hr. A 

Individualized reading programs are tailored to meet the particular 
needs of each student. Students experiencing difficulty in 
understanding what they read engage in programs stressing 
comprehension skills. Students with good comprehension but with 
slow reading rates receive assistance in acquiring skills to at least 
double their speed. Additionally, all students are given instruction in 
reading at different rates for different purposes. 

Reading Improvement II 

ENGL 1020 1 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course is a continuation Reading Improvement I. 

Advanced Topics in Reading 

ENGL 1030 1 cr. 3 hr. A 

A continuing third-semester reading enhancement course. 

Writing I 

ENGL 1100 3cr.3hr. A • 

This course explores writing as process and product. Practice, both 
oral and written, in expressing ideas with precision, clarity, and 
economy, the development of research skills, and critical reading are 
emphasized. 

Writing II 

ENGL 1200 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

This course is a continuation of ENGL 1 100 with an emphasis on 
writing as a thinking and learning process. Careful reading, critical 
and creative thinking, and writing, using analysis and synthesis, is 
promoted with the assignment of five writing projects on a range of 
subjects. A research essay is required. Course options incorporate 
various styles and formats related to different situations and 
audiences. 

PREREQUISITE FOR ALL ENGLISH ELECTIVES: ENGL 1100 
Writing I and ENGL 1200 Writing II 

American Literature I: Age of Exploration to the Civil War 

ENGL 2000 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

This course surveys recurring themes and images in early American 
literature. From Columbian narratives to Civil War texts, we trace the 
development of new forms of fiction and poetry as well as 
experiments with traditional forms L 

American Literature II: Civil War to the Present 

ENGL 2100 3cr.3hr. A 

This course surveys all genres of American writing from 1865 to the 
present, tracing the effects of social, economic, scientific and artistic 
turmoil on authors and their works We explore the interconnections 
among succeeding eras of American literature: Realism, Modernism 
and Post-Modernism. L 

English Literature I: Beowulf to Milton 

ENGL 2200 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course surveys English literature from the first extant 
manuscript materials through the early 17th century. We trace 
themes, images, and literary forms that concerned British writers for 
half a millennium. L 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



English Literature II: Pepys to Shelley 

ENGL 2210 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course explores the changing faces of English literature during 
the most tumultuous period of English history, encompassing the 
Civil Wars and leading up to the Industrial Revolution. Selections 
may include Swifts satiric prose, Pope's caustic poetry, Gay's The 
Beggar's Opera, Behn's comedies, Equiano's narrative of escape from 
slavery, Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, and the romantic poets including 
Byron, creator of the Byronic hero. L 

English Literature III: Bronte to Rushdie 

ENGL 2220 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course surveys British writers from the Victorian era to the 
present, tracing their responses to the revolutionary changes in art, 
music, science, and social and economic classes. Representative 
authors include Dickens, Eliot, Trollope, Barrett- Browning, Wilde, 
Shaw, Woolf, Joyce, and Beckett, authors whose depiction of human 
nature challenged contemporary concepts of self and society. L 

Literature and Disability 

ENGL 2300 3 cr. 3 hr. ▲• 

This course examines individual, family, and societal images of 
disability through autobiography, biography, fiction, poetry, and 
children's literature. Students will explore themes around the disability 
experience using reflective writings, class discussions and activities. L, 
B, IDIS 

Script Writing: Film 

ENGL 2320 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This basic course in script writing for film, television, and multi- 
image productions includes information on the preparation of 
proposals, treatments, storyboards, and scripts. Script formats 
include documentary, educational, corporate, and dramatic film/ 
video writing. 

(Credit is not given for both ENGL 2320 and COMM 2320.) 

Literature and Film 

ENGL 2330 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

This course involves the critical study of literature and film as means 
to convey narratives. The conventions of various literary genres and 
types of films will be considered. Special attention is paid to the 
adaptation of novels and stories for the screen. Students study a 
dozen or more motion pictures in depth and compose six to eight 
critical essays. L, IDIS 

World Literature I 

ENGL 2400 3 cr. 3 hr. ▲• 

This course examines masterpieces from the ancient world through 
the middle of the 1 7th century. L, C 

World Literature II 

ENGL 2500 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

This course examines masterpieces from the mid- 1 7th century to 
the present. L, C 

The Bible as Literature 

ENGL 2600 3 cr. 3 hr. ▲• 

The course examines the style, narrative techniques, symbols, and 
historical setting of the Old and New Testament writers. L, C 

Classical Mythology 

ENGL 2620 3 cr. 3 hr. ▲• 

This course examines pre-Homeric stirrings of symbol and story, 
then moves on to study Virgil and Ovid and Roman traditions. L, C 

Other Voices 

ENGL 2650 3cr.3hr. A 

This course presents works by significant ethnic writers, such as 
James Baldwin, Maxine Hong Kingston, Zora Neale Hurston, M. 
Scott Momoday, Toni Morrison, and Leslie Marmon Silko. L, C 



19th-century African American Literature 

ENGL 2660 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

This course is an introduction to the literature, thought, and literary 
practice of African-American writers throughout the nineteenth 
century. Close reading and analysis of such representative authors as 
Frederick Douglass, Frances E W. Harper, Harriet Jacobs, and 
Sojourner Truth. L, C 

20th-century African American Literature 

ENGL 2670 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

This course is an introduction to the literature, thought and literary 
practice of African American writers from the turn of the century to 
the present. L, C 

The Short Story 

ENGL 2700 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

Significant stories by some of the world's great writers are read and 
analyzed to show the evolution of the short story form. L 

History of the Theater I 

ENGL 2730 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

See THEA 2730 

History of the Theater II 

ENGL 2740 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

SeeTHEA 27 40 

Detective Fiction 

ENGL 2750 3 cr. 3 hr. ▲• 

The mystery novel/crime story genre is explored through a range of 
authors and time periods, including stories from Poe to Conan Doyle, 
classic British fiction, and its distinctively American counterparts, and 
significant contemporary works. L 

Journalism 

ENGL 2800 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course studies the press through individualized writing 

assignments. Emphasis is placed on ethics in news, treatment of 

contemporary issues, and structuring the news story. 

(Credit is not given for both ENGL 2800 and COMM 2800) 

Editing and Publishing 

ENGL 2810 3cr.3hr. A 

This class explores the mechanics of editing, issues of attribution, 
use of sources, balanced coverage and libel laws In addition, the 
relationship between editor and writer with reference to agents, the 
submission and selection process, and collaborating is explored. 
Students also gain an understanding of writing for special markets, 
such as education or medicine, and getting a track record. 




Key to Course Offerings 

Q: designates courses in the 
Quantitative Scientific Cluster 

I: the Ideas and Events Ouster 

B: the Human Behavior Cluster 

L the Literature, Language 
and Arts Cluster 

C Multicultural 

IDIS: Interdisciplinary courses 

Multicultural and interdisciplinary courses also 

fuljill a cluster designation. 

* Asterisk indicates that the course may 
be offered less than once every two years. 

▲ Undergraduate Day School 

• Undergraduate Evening School 

Courses having a more narrow focus than 
those taught on a regular basis or courses 
being taught on an experimental basis can 
be taught as Topics" courses These courses 
will be assigned numbers based on the 
student level for which they are intended — 
first, second, third or fourth year. 



introduction to Secondary School Teaching 

ENGL 2860 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course is required of all students preparing for the initial license 
at the secondary level. A sophomore level course for full-time 
undergraduates and a first course for transfer students, it is taught at 
the local high school and is a clinical laboratory experience. The 
course includes a 25-hour prepracticum requirement and is a 
prerequisite for other certification courses. Students become familiar 
with the complexities of secondary school teaching and its demands. 
The course gives faculty the opportunity to screen students and 
gives students the opportunity to test their commitment to 
teaching. 

The Structure and Nature of Language 

ENGL 2870 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course studies language systems and grammatical theories, 
including the history of the English language, theories of language 
acquisition, and psycholinguistic and sociolinguistic topics. L 

Storytelling and the Oral Tradition 

ENGL 2890 3 cr. 3 hr. ▲ • 

The course studies the oral tradition in European and non- Western 
contexts. Students examine the oral tradition in classic works as well 
as its continuance in fairy tales, popular music, story theater and 
"performance art." Students will consider the structure and 
presentation of traditional, individually composed and "family" 
narratives. Each student will give at least two oral presentations before 
an audience. L, C 

Children's Literature 

ENGL 2900 3 cr. 3 hr. ▲ • 

The course serves as an introductory survey of both classic and 
contemporary children's literature Texts are studied from a variety of 
perspectives in the contexts of both childhood and society. L 

Literature for Young Adults 

ENGL 2910 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

A survey of current books written for readers ages 12 to 18. The 
emphasis is on the best new books available in paperback. Students 
develop skill in evaluating young adult books in terms of literary 
quality, reader interest, and social or political perspective Realistic 
fiction, YA classics, historical novels, science fiction, and poetry are 
some types of books examined. L 

Survey of English Grammar 

■ENGL 2950 1 cr. 1 hr. A 

The course studies traditional and transformational systems of 
English grammar as a basis for understanding conventions of English 
usage. 

Approaches to English Studies 

ENGL 2999 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

An introduction to the academic study of English and the different 
ways readers can connect to, think about, and experience literature. 
The course provides an overview of the discipline's issues and theories 
and gives students experience in writing practical criticism and using 
research tools and methods. L 

World Drama 

ENGL 3000 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course examines significant and representative plays from the 
beginning to the modern period. L, C 

American Drama 

ENGL 3010 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

A survey of American Dramatic Literature from its beginnings in 
the prerevolutionary British Colonies to the present. The course 
involves critical reading of dramatic texts. Students will attend 
productions of plays on and off campus studied in the class. 
Students will engage in active discussion and analysis of these plays 
and be required to write papers on particular authors. L 

Modern Drama 

ENGL 3020 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course examines the works of such playwrights as Ibsen, 
Chekhov, Sartre, Brecht, lonesco, Beckett, and Pinter. L, C 



The Middle Ages 

ENGL 3030 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course examines literature of the British Isles and Europe to 
1500. L 

British Literature Since World War II 

ENGL 3040 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

This course examines fiction, drama, and poetry written in Britain 
and her former Commonwealth since World War II. Special 
emphasis is placed on the role imperialism and decolonization has 
had in literature. Authors examined include AS. Byatt, Derek 
Walcott, Wole Soyinka, Salman Rushdie, and Michael Ondaatje. L 

20th-century Irish Literature 

ENGL 3050 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

A study of Irish fiction from James Joyce through Brian Moore, 
including O'Faolain, O'Connor, O'Brien, O'Flaherty, and McCahem. 

L, C 

Modern Poetry 

ENGL 3060 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

Chief modern poets of America and England are introduced and 
close reading is encouraged in the lyric form of writers such as Eliot 
through Lowell, Plath and other end-of-century writers. Emphasis is 
on these creators as precursors in a tradition. L 

The World Novel to 1914 

ENGL 3100 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course investigates significant novels such as Madame Bovary 
and Anna Karenina representing various countries and periods as well 
as stages in the development of this literary form L, C 

The World Novel Since 1914 

ENGL 3110 3cr.3hr. A 

Students read and discuss modern novels both as aesthetic artifacts 
and as human documents. Representative authors include Kafka, 
Kundera, Naipaul, Marquez. L, C 

Golden Age of English Renaissance Literature 

ENGL 3120 3cr.3hr. A 

This course focuses on the poetry, prose and drama of the English 
Renaissance's "Golden Age," roughly 1530-1625, beginning with 
poetry of the Tudor period and ending with drama from the reign of 
the Stuarts. This period encompasses the work of some of the 
greatest and best-known English authors, lays the foundation for 
many genres of literature, and encompasses many political reigns and 
social and cultural developments. The course will examine major 
literary forms and genres and topical/thematic concerns of writers, 
linking these to key social, political, and historical developments. L 

Major American Writers of the 20th Century 

ENGL 3210 3cr.3hr. A 

The varied creativity of American writers in this century is explored 
through the study of fiction, drama, poetry, criticism, and the essay. L 

American Novel to 1950 

*ENGL 3220 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course provides a close examination of several representative 
works by major American novelists between 1800-1950. L 

Women and Literature 

ENGL 3300 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

Literature by and about women is examined in light of their roles in 
society, at work, and in relationships. L 

Journalist to Novelist 

*E NGL 3400 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This class explores the stylistic and professional development of 
distinguished American writers who began their careers as reporters. 
L 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Technical Documentation 

ENGL 3470 3 cr. 3 hr. ▲• 

This course gives students the opportunity to study and write the 

basic forms of technical documentation found in business and 

industry, including end-user manuals and training guides. Examination 

of graphics, typography, and desktop publishing is considered as they 

apply to hardcopy production. 

(Credit is not given for both ENGL 3470 and COMM 3470.) 

Writing for the Web 

ENGL 3480 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course combines theory and practice as it outlines the 
challenges inherent in writing for the Worldwide Web, and 
examines the practical solutions that are evolving to meet those 
challenges. Students learn the conventions and ethics of Internet 
writing, apply these to critiques of Web pages, and create original 
content for the Web. 

Creative Writing 

ENGL 3500 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

Students write and edit fiction and poetry in a workshop setting. 
Junior standing or approval of the instructor is required to enroll in 
this class. L 

Fiction Writing 

ENGL 3510 3cr.3hr. A 

This course teaches the basics of fiction writing, encouraging 
students to explore the writing processes in a supportive workshop. 
Students will draft, revise, and complete two short fictional pieces, 
either short stories or segments of longer works. Coursework is 
designed to encourage and assist writers to refine their use of various 
fictional techniques and to explore a range of voice and theme to 
create effective short stories and novels. Students work with writing 
partners and peer editing groups to improve their abilities to give and 
receive useful and compassionate editorial feedback. L 

Writing Poetry 

ENGL 3520 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

In this workshop-driven creative writing course, students grapple 
seriously with poetic technique and, in the process, discover their 
own voices as poets. Students will immerse themselves in the 
traditions of formal verse in English and write their won poems in a 
variety of closed and open forms. Students will revise and assemble a 
selection of their best work for a final portfolio, and will be 
encouraged to submit revised work for publication. 

Journalism Practicum: I and II 

ENGL 3810 and 3820 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

These Practica are open to members of the Point and other students 

interested in obtaining hands-on training in journalism with the goal 

of having works published in student and community newspapers. (Pi 

and P2 may be taken separately for a total of 6 credits). 

Prerequisite: ENGL or COMM 2800. 

The American Magazine 

'ENGL 3840 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course provides a close study of significant American 
magazines with emphasis on the editorial policies and requirements, 
audience slant, advertisements, and visual layouts. 

Writing for Business and Technology 

ENGL 3860 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

The course is for students interested in writing in the business, 
industry, and management context. Topics covered: business 
correspondence, description of process and mechanisms, sets of 
instructions, proposals, abstracts, and reports. (Credit is not given for 
both ENGL 3860 and COMM 3860.) 

Feature and Magazine Writing 

ENGL 3870 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course explores writing feature articles for newspapers, 
magazines, and trade journals. (Credit is not given for both ENGL 
3870 and COMM 3870.) 

Prerequisite: ENGL or COMM 2800. 



Creative Nonaction Writing 

ENGL 3890 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course is an upper-level writing workshop that investigates the 
linguistic, social, persuasive, and literary dimensions of creative 
nonfiction. Students read and gain experience writing its various sub- 
genres, which may include memoir, cultural criticism, and literary 
analysis. L 

Prerequisite for all 4000-level literature courses is 

satisfactory completion of one 3-credit literature course 

at the 2000-or 3000-level, or permission of instructor. 

Chaucer and His World 

ENGL 4010 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course emphasizes the Canterbury Tales in their medieval 
context. L 

Shakespeare's Drama: Text and Performance 

ENGL 4020 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course studies several of Shakespeare's dramas with a focus on 
the thematic issues raised by the plays in the texts and in 
performance. Examination involves not only reading and critical 
interpretation, but also attention to performance traditions and recent 
interpretations/adaptation of these works on stage and screen L 

Interpreting Shakespeare's Work 

ENGL 4030 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course will study selected poems and plays from Shakespeare's 
canon, examining particularly his treatment of power, love, gender, 
and "the other." We will consider: Who and what is "Shakespeare"? 
Why is Shakespeare considered the "world's greatest author"? To what 
purposes have "Shakespeare" and Shakespeare's texts been put, in 
literary, historical, ideological, education, and cultural terms? How do 
contemporary readings, films, and production of Shakespeare 
(re)present Shakespeare? L 

Major English Writers of the 17th Century 

*ENGL 4040 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course will survey one or more genres, for example, the dramas 
of Jonson, Webster, Behn, and Congreve, the poetry of Milton, 
Donne, Herbert, Herrick, Marvell, Dryden, Wroth, and Phillips, 
prose work by Browne, Fell, Astell, and Pepys. L 

The Novel in the 18th Century 

ENGL 4050 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course studies the origins of the novel in England as it reflects 
the tastes of a rising middle class. Readings include Defoe, 
Richardson, Fielding, Burney, Johnson, Austen, Edgeworth, 
Heywood, and others. L 

From Classic to Romantic: 1750-1800 

ENGL 4070 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course explores the revolution in manners, philosophy, science, 
and gender as reflected in literature, art, and music from the late 1 8th 
century. Major genres include drama, poetry, fiction, prose, paintings, 




and engravings. L 

Romanticism 

ENGL 4080 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The poetry, prose, and art 
representative of the political, social, 
and artistic upheaval called 
"Romanticism" is considered 
Readings include Romanticism's 
outcasts, alternative voices, and anti 
Romantic writers. L 

The 19th-century English Novel 

ENGL 4090 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

Significant novels demonstrating the 
changing cultural milieu and varying 
approaches of the genre during this 
period are examined and discussed. L 



Key to Course Offerings 

Q: designates courses in the 
Quantitative Scientific Cluster 

1: the Ideas and Events Cluster 

B: the Human Behavior Cluster 

L the Literature, Language 
and Arts Cluster 

C: Multicultural 

IDIS: Interdisciplinary courses 

Multicultural and interdisciplinary courses also 

fulfill a cluster designation. 

* Asterisk indicates that the course may 
be offered less than once every two years. 

A Undergraduate Day School 

• Undergraduate Evening School 

Courses having a more narrow focus than 
those taught on a tegular basis or courses 
being taught on an experimental basis can 
be taught as Topics" courses These courses 
will be assigned numbers based on the 
student level for which they arc intended — 
first, second, third or fourth year. 



The Age of Dickens 

*ENGL 4095 3 cr. 3 hr. ▲ • 

Students read and study the works of Dickens — the literary 
craftsman, the reporter of his age, the social reformer — as a 
foundation for examining the nineteenth century in prose, poetry, 
and/or drama. L 

Victorian Literature 

ENGL 4100 3cr.3hr. A 

The individual's relationship to a changing society in the face of 
nineteenth-century industrialization and scientific progress is 
studied through the major writers of the period. L 

British Modernism 

ENGL 4115 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

This course examines the major texts and trends of what is now 
called High Modernism. Authors studied include Ford Madox Ford, 
James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, and T.S. Eliot. L 

Mark Twain and American Humor 

ENGL 4150 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course explores the writings and career of Mark Twain, and 
humorists who share the Twain legacy, including American film 
comedy and stand-up comics L 

The Romantic Movement in U.S. Literature 1810-1860 

'ENGL 4200 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course explores concepts of nature, idealism, and community in 
the works of Hawthorne, Poe, and others. L 

American Novel Since Worid War II 

ENGL 4230 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The class provides a close analysis of seven or eight major novels. L 

Seminar 

ENGL 4400 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The seminar examines topics for literary analysis and research as 
selected by the instructor The seminar is required for English majors 
taking the literature track Others are admitted by permission of the 
instructor. 

Literary Criticism 

*ENGL 4500 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

Theories about literature are examined, and their practical 
application in the classroom and in one's own reading is discussed. 
Approaches to different forms of literature as well as a survey of 
changing historical perspectives are also explored. 

Teaching Writing in Middle and Secondary Schools 

ENGL 4700/EDUC 4700 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course provides practice and research in alternatives for 
teaching writing in secondary schools Different approaches are 
explored through experiments for the teacher and opportunities to 
test these approaches are available in prepracticum experiences. A 
prepracticum is required. 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2860 or equivalent. 

Special Methods in English 

ENGL 4850 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The final course in the Certification Program for Secondary 

Teachers of English. The approach to teaching English is holistic, 

emphasizing the interrelatedness of all language abilities: speaking, 

listening, reading, and writing. We experiment with and evaluate a 

variety of teaching strategies for creating responsive, reflective, and 

responsible readers, writers, and speakers as well as methods for the 

assessment of student performance. A prepracticum is required. 

Prerequisite: ENGL 2860 and ENGL 4700 or equivalent 

English Practicum in a Secondary School I and II 

ENGL 4860, 4870 6 cr. A 

In the student teaching practicum students are assigned to 
cooperating schools for a semester of student teaching. 



Independent Study 

ENGL 4903 3 cr. A • 

The Independent Study is for English majors excelling in scholarship 
and can be taken upon approval of both department chair and 
advising instructor. Course of study, meetings, and credit are arranged 
with advisor. 

Internship 

ENGL 4940, 4950, 4960 3, 6, 9 cr. A 

Internship 

ENGL 4970 12 cr. A 

The Internship provides an opportunity to gain valuable on-the-job 
experience for college credit by spending one semester (full-time) in 
business or industry. Students select field placement where they can 
use their abilities as communicators, learn new skills, and sample a 
potential job market The Internship is a recommended component of 
the English Department Writing Track. Department approval and 
junior/senior standing required. 

Directed Study 

ENGL 4975 1-6 cr. A • 



Environmental Science 

introduction to Environmental Science 

ENSC 1000 4cr.6hr. ▲• 

The goal of Introduction to Environmental Science is to provide 
students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies 
required to understand interrelationships of the natural world, to 
identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and 
human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these 
problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving and/or 
preventing them. Q 

Field Techniques in Environmental Science I 

ENSC 2000 3 cr. 4 hr. A • 

This course will provide an introduction to the mode of thinking as 
well as the scientific techniques to performing data gathering 
appropriate for work in the field. As such it is appropriate for both 
environmental science and biology students. The focus of the field 
techniques will be ecological/biological. This course is independent of 
ENSC 2100 Field Techniques in Environmental Science II. 

Field Techniques in Environmental Science II 

ENSC 2100 3 cr. 4hr. A • 

This course will provide an introduction to the mode of thinking as 
well as the scientific techniques to performing data gathering 
appropriate for work in the field. As such it is appropriate for both 
environmental science and biology students. The focus of the field 
techniques will be physical/biological This course is independent of 
ENSC 2000 Field Techniques in Environmental Science I. 

Elements of Physical Chemistry 

ENSC 3000 4cr.6hr. A • 

An introductory course in physical chemistry covering: 
thermodynamics, mass-transport, solutions, etc. It is designed to 
provide students with the ability to think critically and utilize physical 
parameters in chemical systems, to perform numerical calculations 
involving these systems, and use this understanding when viewing 
environmental problems and risks. 

Environmental Analysis 

ENSC 4000 4cr.6hr. ▲• 

Students will conduct chemical analyses of air, soil, and water for 
metals, inorganic ions, volatile and semi-volatile organic parameters. 
Participants will be required to collect samples, prepare 
documentation, prepare standards and samples, perform calculations 
and prepare reports detailing procedure, results, and an interpretation 
of the results. 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Seminar in Environmental Science 

ENSC 4100 3 cr. 4hr. A • 

This course will be required of all environmental science students. It 
shall be taken in the student's final year. The course will consist of a 
series of presentations of actual environmental problems. The course 
will include attending local conservation and/or planning commission 
meetings. 

Internship in Environmental Science 

ENSC 4950 4-6 cr. A • 

The internships experience is for senior environmental science 
majors. These internships are to be completed at a participating 
federal, state, local, or private environmental organization A 3.00+ 
cumulative average in the major and cognate departments is required 
to enroll. 

Directed Study 

ENSC 4975 1-6 cr. 

Exercise and Sport Science 

The courses that satisfy the Health and Fitness requirement are 
identified below as Croup I, II, and III. To meet the three-credit 
requirement, select one of the following options: 
One course from Croup I, three courses from Croup II, two courses 
from Croup II and one course from Croup III. 

Group I 

Health and Fitness 

EXSS 1000 3 cr. 3hr. A • 

The course provides a basic survey of the effects of diet, exercise, 
and selected environmental agents on the mental and physical health 
of humans. Topics may include body build and body composition, 
fitness evaluation and programming, nutritional considerations, 
psychological correlates of health, chemical alterations, human 
sexuality, and personal and public health. 

Leadership in the Outdoors 

LEAD 1480 1 cr. 1 hr. A 

This course is part of the Leadership Academy and partially satisfies 
the Health and Fitness requirement for the Academy students. Using 
adventure activities, students will have an opportunity to identify 
their leadership skills, experiment with new leadership strategies and 
identify one or two areas for future development of their leadership 
skills. Also, students will develop a sense of comradery and discover 
that outdoor adventure activities are an enjoyable part of a healthy 
lifestyle. 

Exercise, Nutrition, and Heart Disease 

EXSS 2060 3cr.3hr. ▲• 

This course is designed to examine the integrative relationships 
inherent in the study of exercise, nutrition, and heart disease Body 
build and body composition assessments are made, exercise 
prescriptions and programs are developed, and prevalent 
controversies in the areas of obesity, dietary goals, guidelines and 
plans, atherosclerosis, and heart disease are discussed. Course sections 
that fulfill this requirement are designated as such. Some sections are 
for EXSS majors only. 

Group II 

Jogging: Theory and Practice 

EXSS 1400 1 cr. 2 hr. A 

The theories and practices of cardiovascular conditioning using 
jogging as the activity mode are presented. Pre-post cardiovascular 
and body composition evaluations are made and program 
prescriptions are designed. Topics covered include training principles 
and programs, energy sources, aerobic and anaerobic processes, 
nutrition, exercise and weight control, exercise training effects, 
psychological considerations, environmental conditions, injuries, and 
running. 



Body Shaping 

EXSS 1440 1 cr. 2 hr. A 

The theory of weight training and diet in relation to body shaping is 
discussed. Each student undergoes physique, body composition, 
aerobic fitness, and muscular strength evaluations before and after a 
weight training program. 

Weight Training for Athletes 

EXSS 1450 1 cr. 2 hr. A 

The course examines theory for the development of muscular 
strength for specific athletic activities. Anthropometric, body 
composition, and muscular strength evaluations are assessed prior to 
and following an individually developed weight training program. 

Standard First Aid/Adult CPR 

EXSS 1460 1 cr. 2 hr. A • 

A behaviorally oriented course structured for those responsible for 
the safety and protection of others. Standard First Aid and Adult 
CPR certificates are issued if the student satisfies all the American 
Red Cross requirements. 

Techniques of Road Racing 

EXSS 1470 1 cr. 2 hr. A 

The purpose of the course is to acquaint the student with various 
topics of running long distance road races. Topics covered include the 
physiology of running, training strategies, injury care and prevention, 
nutritional aspects and methods of assessing running ability. Each 
student undertakes a training program, and participates in three road 
races. 

Stress Management 

EXSS 1490 1 cr. 1 hr. A 

This course is a multifaceted and holistic approach to the 
understanding and control of stress in a wellness context. Topics 
covered include stress psychophysiology, the relationship between 
stress and illness, life situation and perception interventions, time 
management, and bioecological stressors. Also, the study and 
implementation of specific relaxation techniques such as 
diaphragmatic breathing, progressive relaxation, exercise, autogenics, 
and mediation will be covered. 

Consumer Health 

EXSS 1510 1 cr. 1 hr. A 

This course is designed to help the student evaluate health and 
fitness information critically, and select products and services wisely. 
The areas of quackery, alternative medicine, nutrition, personal 
fitness and consumer protection are studied. The course is a 
requirement of Leadership Academy students. 

Diet, Exercise, and Weight Control 

EXSS 1520 1 cr. 2 hr. A 

The course is designed for those interested in weight loss or weight 
maintenance through the medium of diet and exercise. After an initial 
assessment of body composition, aerobic fitness, muscular fitness, and 
the establishment of dietary goals, 

each student works toward body Key to Course Offerings 

weight goals through actual Q. designates courses in the 

programs of exercise and diet. Quantitative Scientific Cluster 

I: the Ideas and Events Ouster 
GrOUp III B: the Human Behavior Cluster 

L: the Literature, Language 
and Arts Cluster 

C Multicultural 
two clock hours per week and one ir . ic , , ,. ... 

,. r IDIS: Interdisciplinary courses 

Multicultural and interdisciplinary courses also 
fulfill a cluster designation. 

* Asterisk indicates that the course may 
be offered less than once every two years. 

▲ Undergraduate Day School 

• Undergraduate Evening School 

Courses having a more narrow focus than 
those taught on a regular basis or courses 
being taught on an experimental basis can 
be taught as Topics" courses. These courses 
will be assigned numbers based on the 
student level for which they are intended — 
first, second, third or fourth year. 




Ill 

Activity courses are taught on a 
semester basis. Each semester carries 




EXSS 1010 


Basketball 


EXSS 1020 


Volleyball 


EXSS 1040 


Tennis 


EXSS 1050 


Advanced Tennis 


EXSS 1060 


Badminton 


EXSS 1070 


Karate 


EXSS 1080 


Judo 


EXSS 1120 


Aerobics 


EXSS 1130 


Dance Aerobics 


EXSS 1150 


Canoeing 


EXSS 1170 


Introduction to Mountain Hiking 


EXSS 1180 


Backpacking 


EXSS 1190 


Downhill Skiing 


EXSS 1200 


Cross Country Skiing 


EXSS 1210 


Modern Jazz 1 


EXSS 1220 


Modern Jazz II 


EXSS 1230 


Modern Jazz III 


EXSS 1240 


Yoga 


EXSS 1250 


Bicycle Touring 


EXSS 1280 


Orienteering 


EXSS 1300 


Recreational Sports 


EXSS 1310 


African Jazz Dance 


EXSS 1410 


Beginning Swimming 


EXSS 1420 


Intermediate Swimming 


EXSS 1430 


Introduction to Water Aerobics 



Professional Courses 

Lifeguarding 

EXSS 1500 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The Lifeguarding course is designed to teach lifeguards the skills and 
knowledge needed to prevent and respond to aquatic emergencies. 
Upon successful completion of the course, students can earn 
American Red Cross certification in Lifeguard Training. First Aid 

and CPR for the Professional Rescuer 

Prerequisites: Swim 500 yards continuously using the following strokes: 200 

yards of front crawl, 100 yards breastroke, 200 yards mixture of front crawl or 

breastroke. Swim 20 yards using the front crawl or breastroke surface dive to a 

depth of 7-10 feet, retrieve a 10 pound object, surface and swim 20 yards back 

to the starting point with the object. 

Motor Learning and Physical Performance 

EXSS 2040 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course is designed to provide students with an overview of the 
study of motor learning and physical performance. Selected motor 
learning theories and the factors of skill acquisition are covered 
relative to the physical performance parameters of practice and the 
applied processes of instruction. 

Motor Control and Performance 

EXSS 2045 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

A study of the neurophysiological basis for motor control and 
performance. Brain control of movement in daily living, in sport, 
and in motor deficits are among the topics studied. 

Prerequisite: EXSS 2040 Motor Learning and Physical Performance, 24 

credits completed. 

Functional Anatomy 

EXSS 2050 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course is a study of anatomical structure and its function in 

human motion. Topics include: the anatomy of the musculoskeletal 

systems, primary musculature involved in specific motions, the 

anatomy of force production, range of motion and movement 

planes Considerable practical experience in the analysis of motion 

from a functional anatomical basis is given. 

Prerequisite: BIOL 1200. 

Exercise Physiology 

EXSS 2070 3 cr. 

In this course, human systemic response and adaptation to exercise 
and exercise training is studied in-depth. Topics included are 
epidemiology and physiology in health and disease, homeostasis and 
exercise metabolism, bioenergetics, nutrition, exercise and 
performance, exercise prescriptions for health, training, exercise and 
the environment, and factors limiting performance. Laboratory 
experiences provide practical assessment skills as well as application 



of the scientific method to problems and issues in this field. 

This course satisfies the Health and Fitness requirement for Exercise 

and Sport Science, Biology/Exercise Science and Fitness Management 

majors. 

Prerequisite: Anatomy and Physiology I and II 
or Human Biology and Human Physiology. 

Nutrition in Exercise and Sport 

EXSS 2300 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course involves a thorough discussion of the principles of 
general nutrition Emphasis is placed on the examination of 
specialized diets for training, weight control and body enhancement, 
and on the use of ergogenic aids during exercise and exercise 
training. Course material is enhanced by researching current trends, 
and by personal nutrition projects. 

Prerequisites: 24 credits completed. 

Health Promotion 

EXSS 2400 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course involves the design, implementation, and evaluation of 
wellness programs to the health care industry to the private sector. 
Marketing applications including materials production, are 
considered. Specific program design includes exercise prescription, 
nutrition, smoking cessation, stress management, and other health- 
related topics. 

Human Motor Development 

EXSS 2500 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course focuses on human development processes, especially 
with regard to response and adaptation to exercise in children and 
the elderly, motor control, and decline of function with aging. 

Prerequisite: 24 credits completed. 

Biomechanics 

EXSS 3020 3 cr. 

This course involves the study of the mechanical aspects that 
underlie human motion. Mechanical considerations include 
describing motion in terms of levers, linear and angular acceleration, 
velocity, and projectiles, and the determination of motion by 
studying force, inertia, mass, momentum, impulse, drag, lift, 
buoyancy, center of gravity, and stability. Application of anatomical 
and mechanical principles is related to the improvement of 
performance in selected sports. 

Co-requisite or Prerequisite: EXSS 2050 Functional Anatomy 

Adaptations 

EXSS 3050 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course is designed to integrate the natural and exercise sciences 
from the standpoint that survival of the organism depends upon its 
ability to adapt to a given environment The acute and chronic effects 
of several stressors found within the environment such as oxygen, 
light/dark, exercise, heat/cold, emotion/stress, altitude, nutrition and 
evolution are studied in the classroom and the laboratory. Q, IDIS 

Prerequisite: EXSS 2070. 

Scientific Foundations of Strength Training and Conditioning 

EXSS 3120 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course combines the theoretical and practical aspects of 
strength training and conditioning. Topics covered include exercise 
and fitness-related principles and practices of physiology, 
neuromotor control, biochemistry, anatomy, biomechanics, and 
endocrinology. The development of state-of-the-art, safe, and 
effective strength and cardiorespiratory endurance training 
programs are presented. This course is offered to all Fitchburg State 
College students However, some sections are designated for EXSS 
majors only. These sections carry a prerequisite of EXSS 2070. 

Apprenticeship 

EXSS 3130 1-3 cr. A 

These one-credit on-campus experiences are designed to enhance 

theory through cogent work in a specific area, such as exercise 

testing, strength training, fitness management, and research skills. 

Students apply for apprenticeships with specific professor in the 

semester prior to the semester in which the work will be done. 

Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing. 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Exercise Metabolism 

EXSS 3300 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

An in-depth study of human physiological principles as applied to 

physical activity and sport. Focus will be on acute and chronic 

responses to exercise from various perspectives. Students will study 

topics concerned with bioenergetics during exercise, including: 

substrate utilization, oxygen use, anaerobic threshold, chemo 

mechanical coupling, electrolyte imbalance, and hormonal control 

of metabolism. 

Prerequisite: EXSS 2070, CHEM 1100. 

Exercise Testing and Prescription 

EXSS 3450 3 cr. 

Theory and practice for evaluating and prescribing exercise for the 

enhancement of the functional capacity of the cardiopulmonary, 

metabolic, and musculoskeletal systems in health and disease. Basic 

topics include: review of scientific bases for testing and prescription, 

human behavior and motivation, basic electrocardiology, risk factors 

in exercise and exercise testing, health appraisal and fitness testing, 

exercise programming, nutrition and weight management, and 

program administration. This course is based on the knowledge 

required for certification as a Health/Fitness Instructor by the 

American College of Sports Medicine. 

Prerequisites: EXSS 2070 Exercise Physiology. 

Exercise Response and Adaptations in Special Populations 

EXSS 3600 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

This course focuses on the modification of testing and the 
development of individualized prescriptive exercise programming 
with regard to cardiovascular disease, diabetes, arthritis, obesity, and 
respiratory disorders. 

Prerequisite: EXSS 3450 

Fundamentals of Coaching 

EXSS 4000 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

An analysis of the principles and practices of coaching in various 
sports is presented for the prospective teacher/coach. 

Recreational Leadership 

EXSS 4010 3cr.3hr. A 

The organization and administration of recreational activities are 
presented in reference to the development of the principles and 
practices in both school and community programs. 

Camp Counseling 

'EXSS 4020 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

Course content provides an opportunity to study some of the 
problems in the field of camping. Emphasis is placed on acquiring 
essential skills for camp life, developing various leadership styles as a 
camp counselor, and addressing the individual and group needs of 
campers. 

Physical Education, Fitness and Sport: An Overview 

EXSS 4030 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course is designed to provide the student with an overview of 
the philosophic history, administrative/management patterns, and 
current professional and academic disciplinary program approaches in 
physical education, fitness, and sport. Emphasis will be directed 
towards the new and changing nature of physical education relative 
to career perspectives. 

Fitness Management 

EXSS 4040 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The focus of this course is the planning and implementation of 
fitness programs in the commercial and corporate settings. Topics 
include: organization management, staff management, strategic 
planning, risk management, program promotion and marketing, and 
sales. 

Prerequisites: BSAD 3200, BSAD 3300. 



Cardiovascular Physiology and Electro Physiology 

EXSS 4045 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

Cardiovascular dynamics is studied through the anatomy, electro 
physiology, and pathology of the cardiovascular systems. 
Description of the ECC variations and the underlying mechanisms 
forms the foundation for practical experience in clinical 
interpretation of the ECC. 

Prerequisite: EXSS 2070 Exercise Physiology. 

Art of Dance (Arts Credit) 

EXSS 4050 3cr.3hr. ▲• 

This course offers students the opportunity to experience dance 
aesthetically, kinesthetically, and intellectually. Representative styles 
from tribal through contemporary dance are covered. Videotapes, 
movement labs, papers, presentations, concert attendance, and 
performance are included. Teaching in the After School Movement 
Program at McKay is an option. L, C 

Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing or permission. 

Outdoor Education 

EXSS 4060 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course is designed to explore and experience the use of the 
outdoors as a medium in the educational process. Topics covered 
include introduction to outdoor education, teaching methodology, 
basic principles of high adventure activities, school camping, and 
outdoor education programs. Students participate in a number of 
outdoor adventure activities. 

Physical Education in the Elementary School 

EXSS 4080 lcr.2hr. A 

This theory and practice course is designed to guide the classroom 
teacher in organizing a comprehensive program of physical 
education and recreational activities. 

Movement Education 

EXSS 4100 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

Movement Education is a theoretical and an experiential course 
designed for working with the creative process in an 
interdisciplinary manner. The relationship of movement in 
developmental processes is explored. Movement experiences, group 
leadership, curriculum development, and evaluation are covered. 
Teaching in the After School Movement Program at McKay is an 
option. 

Programs in Recreation 

EXSS 4110 3cr.3hr. A 

This course is designed to acquaint students with different types of 
programs in the recreation field. The development of traditional and 
innovative programs are explored and evaluated in the classroom 
and through field trips. Topics covered include program 
foundations, traditional and innovative curricula, program planning, 
implementation, and evaluation. 

Making Dances: Choreography and Composition 

EXSS 4130 3cr.3hr. A» 

Opportunities to develop and 

analyze the structure and imagery of 

dances and music are offered. Each 

participant works improvisationally 

as choreographer and dancer in the 

development of solo performances as 

well as small and large group works. 

This course includes concert 

attendance, performance, reading and 

written assignments. L 

Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing or 
permission. 




Key to Course Offerings 

Q: designates courses in the 
Quantitative Scientific Cluster 

I: the Ideas and Events Ouster 

B: the Human Behavior Cluster 

L: the Literature, Language 
and Arts Cluster 

G Multicultural 

IDIS: Interdisciplinary courses 

Jvlu/ticu/turrtl and interdisciplinary counts also 

julfill a cluster designation. 

* Asterisk indicates that the course may 
be offered less than once every two years. 

▲ Undergraduate Day School 

• Undergraduate Evening School 

Courses having a more narrow focus than 
those taught on a regular basis or courses 
being taught on an experimental basis can 
be taught as Topics" courses These courses 
will be assigned numbers based on the 
student level for which they are intended — 
first, second, third or fourth year. 



Psychology of Sport 

EXSS 4160 1 cr. 2 hr. A 

The course provides a basic overview of the psychological impact of 
sport upon participants and spectators. The areas of motivation, 
winning and losing, competition, behavior modification, and 
aggression are explored 

Senior Seminar in Leadership and Professional Ethics 

EXSS 4200 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

Using a case study approach in various professional topics, this 

capstone course focuses on the leadership skills needed in the fitness 

industry and the clinical environment. It also emphasizes ethical 

practice. Students will study pertinent literature, and write a paper 

on current issues. 

Prerequisite: senior standing. 

Independent Study 

EXSS 4900 1-3 cr. A • 

The Independent Study is open to students who have permission of 
the supervising instructor and the department. Course of study, 
meetings, and credit are arranged upon approval. 

Internship 

EXSS 4950 6 cr. 

Students gain 1 20 hours of field experience at an outside agency 
related either to the fitness industry or clinical physiology. 
Assignments are contingent upon the student's abilities, interests, 
career goals, and acceptance by the cooperating institution. One or 
two full days during the week may be required Three on-campus 
meetings are required, as is a critical incidents journal, an 
informational interview, a comprehensive paper and an oral 
presentation. A minimum of six credits is required 

Prerequisites: senior standing, a 2. 75 in EXSS courses, and approval of the 
Exercise and Sport Science department. 

Directed Study 

EXSS 4975 1-6 cr. 



French 



French for Beginners I 

FREN 1000 3cr.3hr. ▲• 

The correct pronunciation, reading ability, and fundamentals of 
grammar and syntax are taught in this class. Over the semester French 
gradually becomes the working classroom language. The class is 
designed for students with no language experience or less than two 
years of French at a high school level. 

Note: Students with two or more years of language instruction are 
not admitted without permission of Instructor. L, C 

French for Beginners II 

FREN 1100 3 cr. 3hr. A • 

This class serves as a continuation of FREN 1000. L, C 

Intermediate French I 

FREN 2000 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course includes practice in conversation practice as well as 

readings stressing life, customs, and culture of France. L, C 

Prerequisite: two years of high school, French II 
and/or permission of Instructor. 

Intermediate French II 

FREN 2100 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course serves as a continuation of FREN 2000. L, C 

Methods for Teaching French in the Elementary School 

'FREN 2400 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course provides techniques and materials for use in teaching 
French at an elementary school level. The course is required for 
foreign language specialization A minimum of twelve semester hours 
of French or its equivalent and Instructor's permission is required to 
enroll. 



French Civilization 

FREN 3000 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course covers the history, geography, fine arts, and literature of 
the French people from the earliest times through today. Course work 
includes extensive readings in French. I, L, C, IDIS 

Prerequisite: FREN 2100 or permission of Instructor. 

French Literature 

FREN 3300 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course will present a cultural, historical and sociological study 
of France as mirrored in selected works of French writers and 
thinkers. The time period is from the Medieval ages through and 
including the 20th century. L, C 

Prerequisite: FREN 2100 or permission of Instructor. 

French Conversation and Composition 

FREN 3500 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course is recommended for students who desire greater fluency 
in speech and writing as well as for students taking civilization and 
literature courses. L, C 

Prerequisite: FREN 2100 or permission of Instructor. 

Independent Study 

FREN 4901-4903 1-3 cr. 1-3 hr. A 

The Independent Study is open to students in the language with the 
permission of the supervising Instructor and the Department Chair. 
Meeting times and credit are arranged upon approval. 

Advanced Independent Study in French 

FREN 4906 6 cr. 6 hr. A 

Prerequisite: minimum of 12 semester hours, 2.0 grade-average in French, and 
permission of Instructor, Department Chairman. 

Directed Study 

FREN 4975 1-6 cr. A 

Interdisciplinary 

(General Studies) Capstone 

IDIS 4803, 4805, 4806, 4809, 4812, 4815 3-12 cr. 

The culminating course for the IDIS major. It can be an internship, a 
special project, or in independent research program. Course is 
proposed by the student on a special form provided by the 
Coordinator of Interdisciplinary Studies and approved by the advising 
committee The content of this course should demonstrate the 
integration of the student's fields of study. Contact the Coordinator 
of Interdisciplinary Studies for further instruction. 

Geo/ Physical Sciences 

Introduction to Geography 

GEOG 1000 3cr.3hr. ▲• 

This course explores the complex interrelationships between the 
earth's physical features and human activity. Topics include earth/sun 
relationships, mapping techniques, atmospheric processes that 
produce clouds, precipitation and storms (including tornadoes, 
hurricanes and mid-latitude cyclones), global climate/vegetation/soils, 
rocks, earthquakes, mountain building, volcanoes, glaciers, river 
systems and plate tectonics/continental drift Human impacts on the 
environment such as the ozone issue, global warming/climatic 
change, groundwater contamination, disease, population and global 
food supply are discussed. I, IDIS 

Principles of Human Geography 

GEOG 1100 3cr.3hr. ▲• 

The course introduces the elements and processes underlying 
economic, social, and political geographic patterns, with applications 
to actual case studies and situations. I 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Earth, Sea, and Air 

GEOG 1300 3 cr. 4hr. A • 

Offered fall semester for day students. The course is comprised of 
selected topics from the Earth Sciences Learning Standards of the MA 
Science Curriculum Frameworks. Laboratory required. Q 

Geology 

GEOG 2100 3 cr. 4 hr. A • 

Offered spring semester for day students. The course is an 
introductory survey of the basic elements of physical and historical 
geology. The class is open to all students. A laboratory is required. 
GEOG 1 000 is strongly suggested. Q 

Atmospheres l-Meteorology 

GEOG 2200 3 cr. 4 hr. A • 

The fundamental principles of weather systems are introduced. 
Emphasis is on mid-latitude phenomena and weather forecasting 
techniques using data from sites on the Internet. Topics in tropical 
meteorology and severe storm phenomena are also discussed. 
Laboratory is required. Q 

Atmospheres II— Climatology 

*GE0G 2300 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course explains the regional differentiation of the climatic 

zones of the major land and ocean areas of the world. Special 

attention is given to urban climatology and the energy and moisture 

climatology of the earth. 

Prerequisite: GEOG 2200 Meteorology or permission of the Instructor. 

Computer Applications in Geography/ Earth Science 

GEOG 2400 3cr.3hr. A* 

Introduction to four spheres of relevance to the Geosciences: the 

Internet as a source of data, educational software, computer mapping, 

and overview of Geographic Information Systems. 

Prerequisite: GEOG 1000 and permission of the Instructor. 

Oceanography 

GEOG 2500 3 cr. 4 hr. A • 

The course studies the physical and chemical properties of sea water, 
atmosphere interaction with the sea surface, and currents and volume 
flow. In addition the energy budget of the oceans and the submarine 
geology of the ocean basins are explored. Students participate in a 
thorough discussion of ocean floor spreading and coastal processes. 
Laboratory is required. Q 

Map Use 

GEOG 2800 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

This course considers the nature and role of maps in communicating 
aspects of the earth's natural and human environments. Skills learned 
include map reading, relating map symbols to real world features,- 
map analysis, extracting information from maps, and map 
interpretation. I 

Introduction to Secondary School Teaching 

GEOG 2860 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course is required of all students preparing for initial license at 
the secondary level. It is a sophomore level course for full-time 
undergraduates and the first course taken by transfer students. It is 
taught at the local high school and is a clinical laboratory experience. 
This course includes a 25-hour prepracticum requirement and is a 
prerequisite for other certification course requirements Students 
become familiar with the complexities of secondary school teaching 
and its demands The course gives faculty the opportunity to screen 
students and give students the opportunity to test their commitment 
to teaching. 

Geographic Economic System 

'GEOG 3000 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course analyzes factors underlying the spatial distribution of 
primary, secondary, and tertiary economic activities, with emphasis 
on locational processes in commercial economies. I, C, IDIS 



Political Geography 

'GEOG 3100 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course examines dependent and independent political units, 
boundary disputes, strategic areas, buffer zones, and the function of 
international organizations. 

U.S. and Canada 

*GE0G 3200 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

The course includes U.S. and Foreign Area Studies. Students 
conduct regional and systematic analysis based upon geographic 
elements influencing domestic evolution and international relations. 

Prerequisite: GEOG 1000. 

Introduction to Historical Geology 

GEOG 3250 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

Offered fall semester in even years for day students. 
This course studies the physical history of the earth based on 
evidence from the rock and fossil records from the early Paleozoic 
Era through the present. The evolution of life forms, subjective and 
absolute dating methods, fossil identification, and fossil evidence 
supporting plate tectonics theory are some of the topics studied. 
Laboratory is required 

Prerequisite: GEOG 2100 or permission of Instructor. 

Common Rocks and Minerals 

GEOG 3270 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

Offered spring semester in oddyears for day students. 
Major rock and mineral types are studied. Considerable time is 
spent on field and laboratory identification techniques. Mineral 
crystal systems and rock and mineral forming processes are also 
studied. Laboratory is required. 

Prerequisite: GEOG 2100, CHEM 1300. 

Population Geography 

GEOG 3400 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course addresses population processes and characteristics 
relative to resources in both economically developed and 
underdeveloped countries and regions. Course material provides 
both a systematic and regional view of world population problems. I 

Geographic Information Systems 

GEOG 3500 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

Characteristics and applications of GIS in a computerized, desktop 
mapping environment. Focus on gaining competence in the use of a 
particular GIS program, namely, Arc View, Idrisi. 

Prerequisite: GEOG 1000. 

Atmospheres Ill-Planetary Atmospheres 

*GE0G 4110 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course seeks to explain the similarities and differences between 

the earth's atmosphere and the atmospheres of the planets and moons 

in our solar system. Each atmosphere is studied to determine its 

chemical composition, thermal structure, energy budget, pressure, 

wind systems, clouds, precipitation, and other pertinent 

meteorological phenomena. 

Prerequisite: GEOG 2200. 




Geomorphology 

GEOG 4200 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

The course provides a comprehensive 
study of land forms and their origins. 

Laboratory is required. 

Prerequisite: GEOG 2100, Geology or 
permission of the Instructor. 

Structural Geology 

GEOG 4220 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

Offered in the fall semester in odd years for 
day students. 
This course studies rock structures 
developed by the application of 
deformational forces. Topics covered 
include the elementary concepts of 
stress and strain and the geometry of 
joints, faults, folds, foliations and 

lineations. Q 

Prerequisites: GEOG 2100, PHYS 2300, 
MATH 1300 or permission of the Instructor. 



Key to Course Offerings 

Q: designates courses in the 
Quantitative Scientific Cluster 

I: the Ideas and Events Ouster 

B: the Human Behavior Cluster 

L: the Literature, Language 
and Arts Cluster 

C Multicultural 

IDIS: Interdisciplinary courses 

Multicultural and interdisciplinary courses alio 

fulfill a cluster designation. 

* Asterisk indicates that the course may 
be offered less than once every two years. 

A Undergraduate Day School 

• Undergraduate Evening School 

Courses having a more narrow focus than 
those taught on a regular basis or courses 
being taught on an experimental basis can 
be taught as Topics" courses These courses 
will be assigned numbers based on the 
student level for which they are intended — 
first, second, third or fourth year. 



Urban Geography 

'GEOG 4400 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course analyzes the external relationships and internal structure 
of cities. Emphasis is placed on the spatial attributes of contemporary 
urban qualities and problems in America. Classroom activities are 
supplemented by applied studies in the greater Fitchburg-Leominster 
area. 

Remote Sensing of the Environment 

GEOG 4500 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

Techniques in the use of satellite and aerial imagery as applied to 
landscape analysis and resource management are studied. Laboratory 
is required. 

Prerequisite: GEOG 2100. 

Environmental Hydrogeology 

GEOG 4600 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

Offered spring semester in even years for day students. 

A case study approach is used to apply basic principles of geology to 
environmental problems caused by flooding, groundwater 
contamination, pollution due to human activity, and landslides, 
among other topics. Laboratory is required 

Prerequisite: GEOG 2100 or GEOG 4200, CHEM 1300, MATH 1300, PHYS 

2300 or permission of instructor. 

Geographic Perspectives on Conservation 

*GE0G 4700 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course provides an analysis of natural resources problems arising 
from changes in technology, population pressure, and concern with 
the quality of environment. 

Prerequisite: GEOG 1000. 

Cartography I 

GEOG 4800 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course treats the principal aspects of cartography as a 
communication process. Taken into consideration are the nature and 
purpose of mappable information, elements of map design, and 
methods involved in map construction. 

Cartography II 

*GE0G 4820 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

Emphasis is on the compilation, layout, and design of maps. 

Students are involved in the construction of maps using traditional 

as well as computerized methods. 

Prerequisite: GEOG 4800. 

Special Methods in 
Teaching Earth Science 

GEOG 4850 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course reviews lesson planning, selection of materials, 

curriculum development, and relevant research. 
Prerequisites: ENGL 4700 (8-12 Licensure) and EDUC 3010 (5-8 Licensure). 

Earth Science Practicum in a Secondary School I and II 

GEOG 4860, 4870 12 cr. A 

For the Teaching Practicum in earth science, students are assigned to 
cooperating schools for a semester of student teaching. 

Independent Study in Geography 

GEOG 4900 1, 2, 3 cr. A • 

The Independent Study provides exceptional students with the 

opportunity to do research with faculty guidance in a subject or 

problems of geographic significance. 
Prerequisites: 12 hrs. of Geography and permission of Instructor. Hours and 

credit by arrangement 

Internship in Geography 

GEOG 4940, 4950, 4960 3, 6, 12 cr. A 

The Internship provides work experiences in private and 
governmental concerns. Assignments depend on the needs of the 
participating agency and interests and vocational objectives of the 
student. 

Prerequisites: junior or senior standing and permission of Internship 

Coordinator. 



Directed Study 

GEOG 4975 1-6 cr. 



German 



German for Beginners I 

GER 1000 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

The correct pronunciation, reading ability, and fundamentals of 
grammar and syntax are taught in this class. Over the semester 
German gradually becomes the working classroom language. Student 
use German language films, cassettes, and Apfeldeutsch, a computer 
course for German, as part of their instruction. Students with two or 
more years of German are not admitted without permission of the 
Instructor. L, C 

German for Beginners II 

GER 1100 3cr.3hr. ▲• 

This class is a continuation of GER 1000. 
L,C 

Intermediate German I 

GER 2000 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course includes practice in conversation as well as readings 
stressing life, customs, and culture of Germany. L, C 
Prerequisites: two years of high school German or GER 1000 and GER 1100. 

Intermediate German II 

GER 2100 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This class is a continuation of GER 2000. L, C 

Modem German Literature in Translation 

•GER 2800 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course introduces the varied creativity of German writers of 
fiction, drama, and poetry of the 20th century. The German film 
contribution of the 1920s with feature-length films is included. 
Readings are in translation and the course is conducted in English. 

Modern German Culture: "The Road to Hitler" 

•GER 2900 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course examines the cultural factors in music, art, literature, and 
film, which illuminate the events leading to National Socialism. 
Readings focus on translated materials, especially in literature, which 
help to explain why the Germans embraced Adolph Hitler. The class 
includes a significant audio-visual component and is given in English. 
I 

German Conversation and Composition 

*GER 3500 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course is designed to increase the student's ability to write and 

speak German. Students are expected to write compositions on topics 

developed orally in class. 

Prerequisite: GER 2100 or permission of Instructor. 

Independent Study in German 

GER 4901-49031-3 cr. 1-3 hr. A • 

Advanced Independent Study in German 

GER 4906 6cr.6hr. ▲• 

The Independent Study is open to students studying German with 
the permission of the supervising Instructor and the Department 
Chairman. Meeting times and credit are arranged with approval. 

Directed Study 

GER 4975 1-6 cr. A 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Graphics 



Interdisciplinary Graphics Seminar 

A 
Through lectures, presentations by speakers, and projects, students 
study advanced topics in graphics. The topics are chosen to 
emphasize state-of-the-art technologies in graphics. The course is 
administered by faculty from the Graphics Center and the material 
varies from semester to semester to meet the needs and interests of 
the participants. 



History 



Note: All history courses at or above the 

2000 level have as a prerequisite, 

Writing II (ENGL 1200) 

World Civilizations I 

HIST 1000 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

This course covers the beginnings of humanity to 1350. It 
investigates ancient empires and the development of the great world 
religions. The interdependence of Eurasia is stressed while the 
independent existence of the Amerindian and African empires is also 
explored. I, C 

World Civilizations II 

HIST 1100 3cr.3hr. A* 

This course investigates the period 1350-1815. The rise of Europe, 
the resurgence of Islam, the alteration of the Americas, and the 
continued independent existence of Asiatic and African empires is 
studied. Additional emphasis is placed on worldwide 
interdependence. I, C 

World Civilizations III 

HIST 1150 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course studies the major wars as well as the social, economic, 
and political changes in the world from 1815 to the present. Major 
themes covered are nationalism, global interdependence, and the 
effects of technology upon peoples. I, C 

United States History I 

HIST 1400 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

The course is a survey of United States History beginning with 
colonial times and continuing through the era of Reconstruction 
following the Civil War. I 

United States History II 

HIST 1500 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

The course is a survey of the United States from 1 877 to the present. I 

Introduction to History: Freshman Seminar 

HIST 1900 3 cr. 3 hrs. A 

The "Freshman Seminar" will explore the interaction of historical 
actors and events with geography and time. This course is topically 
arranged according to the interests and specialization of the 
instructor. It is, moreover, writing and reading intensive. 

Ancient Greece and Rome 

HIST 2020 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This survey of ancient Greece and Rome begins with the settlement 
of Bronze Age Crete and concludes with the fall of the Roman 
Empire. It stresses the political, religious, economic, intellectual, and 
military developments of the ancient west. Particular emphasis is 
placed on innovations in art, architecture, poetry, philosophy, and 
history. 



Judaism and Early Christianity 

HIST 2050 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course is a survey of major developments within Judaism and 
Christianity between 300 B.C.E. and 500 CE. Using both primary 
and secondary sources, it explores historically and thematically the 
socio-economic and political conditions of the period. I 

The European Renaissance 

HIST 2070 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course explores the idea of a European "Renaissance," or a 
reemergence of and response to classical Greek and Roman ideals. 
Chronologically, the period bridged the medieval and early modern 
eras. Geographically, its effects were first felt in Italy, then France, 
England, and the various principalities of the Holy Roman Empire. 
Intellectually, it embraced nearly every field of human endeavor. 

Twentieth-Century Europe 

HIST 2100 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course studies culture, science, and social developments as well 
as domestic and international politics from the first World War to the 
present I 

Europe Today 

HIST 2110 3 cr. 3hrs. A 

An introduction to the major themes in modern European history 
and political science. The focus will be on the roots of 
contemporary Europe, European politics and economics, ethnic and 
religious conflict, citizenship and immigration, European culture and 
Europe's place in the world and relationship with the United States. 

Twentieth-Century Germany 

HIST 2150 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course surveys the history of modern Germany from the 
origins of the Weimar Republic and National Socialism through 
German reunification. I 

Nazi Germany: Hitler's Rise and Fail 

HIST 2155 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

A detailed inquiry into the rise and fall of Nazi Germany. 
Examining the Weimar Republic, the course will analyze how Hitler 
and the Nazis gained power. Analysis of the Nazi dictatorship will 
focus on how Hitler maintained power, how the Nazi years shaped 
German society, Nazi wars of aggression and the total defeat of 
Nazi Germany. I 

Holocaust 

HIST 2160 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course surveys the Holocaust, examining the experience of 
victims, perpetrators "bystanders," and survivors. I 

Armenian Genocide 

HIST 2170 3cr.3hr. A 

In 1915, Armenians, men, women, and children, were forced out of 

their homes in Turkey, slaughtered, and driven across the desert in a 

genocide that preceded the Holocaust by more than two decades. 

Despite the enormity of the crimes 

carried out against Armenians, this 

genocide was generally overlooked 

for many years. This course will 

examine the long and short-term 

causes of genocide, the 

implementation of genocide, and the 

legacy of the Armenian genocide. 

British History to 1688 

HIST 2200 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course studies the development 
of English government and culture 
from the earliest times to the 
Glorious Revolution of 1688. I 




Key to Course Offerings 

Q: designates courses in the 
Quantitative Scientific Cluster 

I: the Ideas and Events Ouster 

B: the Human Behavior Cluster 

L the Literature, Language 
and Arts Cluster 

C Multicultural 

1DIS: Interdisciplinary courses 

Multicultural and interdisciplinary counts also 

fulfill a cluster designation. 

* Asterisk indicates that the course may 
be offered less than once every two years. 

▲ Undergraduate Day School 

• Undergraduate Evening School 

Courses having a more narrow focus than 
those taught on a regular basis or courses 
being taught on an experimental basis can 
be taught as Topics" courses. These courses 
will be assigned numbers based on the 
student level for which they are intended — 
first, second, third or fourth year. 



British History Since 1688 

HIST 2250 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course studies the industrial and agricultural revolutions as well 
as the evolution of the British Empire and Commonwealth. The 
position of Britain in the world today is also discussed. 1 

African-American History 

HIST 2300 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course is an investigation of the African Americans in the 
United States from their African origins to the present. Emphasis is 
placed on the role African Americans played in the economic, 
political, and social life of the United States. I, C 

Eastern Amerindian History 

HIST 2370 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course includes the study of major cultures of Amerindians of 
Eastern North America and Caribbean from prehistoric times through 
contacts with European colonizers. Course work includes the use of 
archaeological, anthropological, literary, and historical records. I, C 

Western Amerindian History 

HIST 2380 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course studies the major cultures of Amerindians West of 
Mississippi River and Meso America from prehistoric times through 
contacts with European colonizers. Course work includes the use of 
archaeological, anthropological, literary, and historical records. I, C 

Massachusetts History 

HIST 2400 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course studies the political, social, and economic trends of the 
Bay State from Plymouth Rock to the Kennedy clan. I 

Women in U.S. History to 1870 

HIST 2490 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course is a multicultural examination of women of all roles and 
classes in the pre-colonial era through 1870. The "lady and the mill- 
girl" polarity in the antebellum era, the emergence of the women's 
rights movement, and women in Victorian culture are covered. I, C 

Women in U.S. History: 1870 to the Present 

HIST 2500 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course studies women in America, including the struggle 
against discrimination and for the ballot as well as the history of 
various women's groups. Emphasis is placed on women of all roles, 
classes, and ethnicity. I, C 

African-American Women's History 

HIST 2520 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

A study of African-American women's history from slavery through 
the Civil Rights Movement (1860-1964), this course focuses on the 
effects of race, class and gender on the interactions of these women 
among themselves, as well as interactions with white women and men 
and African-American men. I, C 

U.S. Military Experience 

HIST 2600 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The class surveys the American wars from the Revolution until 
today. Course work stresses the changing roles of infantry, cavalry, 
and artillery over time and also examines the concept of national 
security at various historical times and under varying conditions I 

Mexico, Central America, and Caribbean History 

HIST 2700 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

Both HIST 2700 and 2750 survey pre-Columbian and Colonial 
backgrounds. The clash and fusion of cultures and the evolution of 
today's Latin American civilizations as they relate to specific 
geographical areas is covered I, C, IDIS 

South American History 

HIST 2750 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

See HIST 2700. I, C, IDIS 



Latin American Revolutions 

HIST 2770 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

This course will address the following questions through survey of 
twentieth-century Latin American revolutions: What is revolution? 
What are its causes? Why do some revolutions succeed, while others 
fail? What do the revolutions of twentieth-century Latin America tell 
us about the specific countries in which they occurred, and about the 
region as a whole? I, C, IDIS 

Far East before 1800 

HIST 2800 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The class examines the development of Chinese, Japanese, Korean, 
and South East Asian Civilization from the earliest time until the 
middle 19th century period. Political, military, and economic 
background is covered, but special emphasis is placed on cultural 
history. I, C 

Modern Far East 

HIST 2850 3 hr. 3 cr. A 

The course covers the major developments in China and Japan from 
19th century to the present It highlights the socio-economic and 
political transformations under the challenges of imperialism and 
nationalism. I, C 

Introduction to Secondary School Teaching 

HIST 2860 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course is required of all students preparing for initial license at 
the secondary level. It is a sophomore level course for full-time 
undergraduates and the first course taken by transfer students. It is 
taught at the local high school and is a clinical laboratory experience. 
This course includes a 25-hour prepracticum requirement and is a 
prerequisite for other certification course requirements. Students 
become familiar with the complexities of secondary school teaching 
and its demands The course gives faculty the opportunity to screen 
students and gives students the opportunity to test their commitment 
to teaching. 

Middle East History Since 1500 

HIST 2920 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course covers political, cultural, religious, and military history 
of the Modern nation states of Middle East. The rise and fall of the 
Ottoman Empire is also covered. I, C 

Modern African History 

HIST 2930 3 cr. 3 hr. 

A survey of 1 9th and 20th century African history, this course 
investigates the slave trade, imperialism, development and the rise of 
African nationalisms. I, C 

Irish History to 1850 

HIST 3100 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

Irish History is studied through significant events such as the 
Rebellion of 1798, the Act of Union, O'Connell, and Catholic 
emancipation, the rise of Irish nationalism, and the great famine of 
1845-50. I 

India Since 1500 

HIST 3200 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course discusses India's traditional society and religion as also 
the legacies of the Mughals, the British, and the nationalist 
movement. By addressing the dramatic cultural and economic 
changes set in motion since the sixteenth century, it examines the 
impact of Islamic, colonial, and nationalist politicians in modern 
India. I, C 

Modem Russia 

HIST 3300 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The class is an intermediate level survey of the major cultural and 
political forces, which have shaped the modern Russian state. The 
course traces the development of Russia from its origins in 10th 
century Kiev, through the Mongol period, and culminates with an 
overview of Russian political, cultural, and intellectual history up to 
the 1917 revolution I, C 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



20th-century Russia 

HIST 3350 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This class is an intermediate level survey of 20th century Russian 
history from 1917 to the revolutionary developments of the 
Gorbachev era. Emphasis is placed on the events and forces that led 
to the Russian Revolution in 1917, the establishment of the Soviet 
Government, the role and character of the Communist party, the 
Khruschev era, and concludes with the "2nd Russian Revolution." I, C 

The Age of Revolutions 

'HIST 3400 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The class covers the major political, social, and cultural 
developments in France, England, and the United States during the 
age of the American, French, and Industrial Revolutions, 1763- 
1848. The meaning and applicability of the term "revolution" is 
examined, and there are a series of case studies in topics such as art 
and politics, romanticism, and the religious revival in England. 

The French Revolution 

HIST 3420 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course treats the Revolution not simply as an event, but also as 
an idea. Thus, we examine the origins and various manifestations of 
the "revolutionary spirit" between 1789 and 1815. Heavy emphasis is 
placed on primary sources, as well as theoretical and historiographical 
issues. 

Women in European History Since 1700 

*HIST 3450 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This is an advanced course in European Women's History beginning 
in 1700 with the changes leading to the French Revolution and 
continuing to today with the new revolutionary changes in Eastern 
Europe. The effects of historical events and policies on the lives of 
French, British, Irish, Jewish, German, Spanish, Italian, and Russian 
Women is examined. I 

American Colonial History 

HIST 3500 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course covers the exploration, settlement patterns, imperial 
system, social structure, rise of representative government in America, 
and the 1 8th-century wars for empires. I 

The American Revolution 

HIST 3550 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course covers the coming of the Revolution, war tactics, and 
strategy, problems of the Confederation period, and the American 
Constitution. I 

The U.S. Civil War and Reconstruction 1830-1877 

HIST 3600 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course examines politics, slavery, and Abolitionism. Political, 
military, and diplomatic aspects of the war and the failure of 
reconstruction is also covered. I 

U.S. 1880-1920: The Progressive Era 

HIST 3655 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The major movements of the late nineteenth and early twentieth 
centuries in United States History are studied in this course, including 
rise of middle class culture, Populism, urbanization, trade unionism, 
consumerism, and Progressivism. I 

U.S. 1920-1945: The Modern Age 

HIST 3700 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course cover topics in American politics, economics, and 
society from 1920-1945, with special emphasis on reform 
movements, the great Depression, and World War II. I 



Cold War 

HIST 3750 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course examines the impact of the Cold War in global 
perspective. Major themes include the developing US-Soviet conflict 
in Europe, nuclear weapons proliferation, Third World revolutionary 
nationalism, detente, the collapse of the USSR, and post-war 
globalization. I 

The U.S. In World Affairs: 1898 to the Present 

HIST 3850 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The class examines America as a global power. Events covered are 
World War I, the era of "isolation," origins of World War II, American 
involvement and wartime diplomacy, breakdown of East- West 
relations, the Cold War, and the Korean and Vietnam conflicts and 
post Cold War world. 

The Frontier in American History 

*HIST 3900 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The Frontier is studied as a historical, social, economic, and 
psychological process to determine its impact on American 
development. 

Writing History 

HIST 4000 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The class introduces the historical method with stress on 
bibliographical aids, historical fallacies, and the theories of history as 
they have developed. The class is primarily for history majors. 

Technology and US Society, 1790-Present 

HIST 4100 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course will explore the history of the US through the lens of 

technology. Topics to be covered include the pre-industrial era, 

industrialization, transportation revolutions, urbanization, the rise of 

engineering, technological systems, the impact of the automobile, the 

communications revolution, and the ethics of technology. 

Prerequisites: HIST 1400 and HIST 1500. 

Seminar 

HIST 4500 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The seminar provides guided readings and research on a specified 
topic. It is designed to enrich research and analytical skills of future 
teachers and those desiring to enter graduate or other professional 
schools. 

Special Methods in Teaching of History 

HIST 4850 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course covers special techniques for the teaching of history and 
their relationship to the principles of general methods. The course is 
taught at the local high school and is a clinical laboratory experience. 
A Pre-Practicum of 25 hours is required. 

Prerequisite: completion of Introduction to Secondary Education. 

History Practicum in a Secondary School I and II 

HIST 4860, 4870 6 cr. A 

In the practicum students are assigned to cooperating schools for a 

semester of student teaching. A 3.00 

GPA in History and an overall GPA 

of 2.75 are required to enter the 

program. In addition, students must 

receive a passing score on the MTEL 

in General Literacy and History prior 

to entering the Practicum. 

Independent Study in History 

HIST 4900 A • 

The Independent Study is open to 
students majoring or specializing in 
history with the permission of the 
supervising Instructor and the 
department. Meeting times and 
credit are arranged upon approval. 




Directed Study 

HIST 4975 1-6 cr. 



A« 



Key to Course Offerings 

Q: designates courses in the 
Quantitative Scientific Ouster 

I: the Ideas and Events Cluster 

B: the Human Behavior Cluster 

L: the Literature, Language 
and Arts Cluster 

C Multicultural 

IDIS: Interdisciplinary courses 

Multicultural and interdisciplinary courses also 

fulfill a cluster designation. 

* Asterisk indicates that the course may 
be offered less than once every two years 

▲ Undergraduate Day School 

• Undergraduate Evening School 

Courses having a more narrow focus than 
those taught on a regular basis or courses 
being taught on an experimental basis can 
be taught as Topics" courses. These courses 
will be assigned numbers based on the 
student level for which they are intended — 
first, second, third or fourth year. 



Human Services 



Introduction to Human Services 

HMSV 1100 3 cr. 3 hr. ▲ • 

This core course serves as an introduction to the breadth and nature 
of human services work. Students will become acquainted with a 
variety of human service agencies at local, state and federal levels (i.e., 
their organization and administration, potential as hiring placements, 
and scope of services). The course facilitates students' awareness of 
the theoretical perspectives, issues and ideological dilemmas in the 
field of human services. The required supervised practicum experience (30 hours 
within a ten week time span) allows students to "shadow" human service 
workers in local agencies as they go about their daily activities, 
thereby gaining firsthand understanding of the nature of the work 
and the realities of a profession in the discipline of social welfare. This 
course is a prerequisite for most other Human Services courses. 

Community Resources 

*HMSV 1150 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

This course acquaints students with the services of a variety of 

public (federal, state and local) and private voluntary non-profit 

agencies which provide services for various populations. Students 

learn the range of services provided, how to make referrals to and 

obtain services from agencies, and how the agencies are operated 

(including staffing, funding, and administration). This course may 

emphasize special types of agencies/populations in different 

semesters. 

Prerequisite: HMSV 1100 

Introduction to Criminal Justice 

HMSV 2000 3 cr. 3hr. ▲ • 

This course provides an overview of the structure and organization 
of the criminal justice system. Emphasis is placed on examining the 
functions and decisions processes of agencies that deal with the 
management and control of crime and criminal offenders. The course 
includes didactic presentations, assigned readings, class discussions, 
visiting practitioner lectures, and small group discussions. 

Research Methods in Human Services Practice 

*HMSV 2050 3 cr. 3 hr. ▲ • 

This core course provides the knowledge and skills necessary to use 
research to inform practice in human services Students will learn the 
basic ideas governing scientific inquiry in applied settings, including 
the formulation of research questions and review of related scientific 
literature. Emphasis will be placed on the basic skills, including 
appropriate statistical techniques, required to understand and 
participate in community needs assessments, program evaluations, 
consumer satisfaction studies, and similar practical research projects. 
Students will develop an understanding of both the ethical 
considerations (including the role of institutional review boards) and 
the issues related to human diversity involved in performing, 
evaluating and using research with human participants. 

Prerequisite: HMSV 1100 

Working with AIDS/ HIV in Human Services 

'HMSV 2100 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

This course provides a comprehensive understanding of the 
psychosocial impact of the HIV/AIDS epidemic as well as appropriate 
community resources and services for dealing with it. The significant 
medical, psychological, social and political consequences of the 
transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus will be examined. 
Cuest lectures and field trips to service provider agencies may 
supplement class discussions, lectures, films and other activities. 

Prerequisite: HMSV 1100 



Crisis Intervention 

'HMSV 2400 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

This course focuses on the concepts and techniques of crisis 
intervention. Many individuals are faced with crisis situations, such as 
job loss, unwanted pregnancy, divorce, medical procedures, death and 
dying and so forth. Students are exposed to the specialized short- 
term techniques that have been developed to help people in these 
situations. A supervised practicum (30 hours) in an agency is required. 

Prerequisites: HMSV 1100, PSY 2350 

Interviewing Techniques 

'HMSV 2500 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

This course is designed to help the student, whose goal is to be 
involved in a helping profession, learn about the problems and 
processes of interviewing while developing basic skills needed to 
become an effective interviewer. The course includes assigned 
readings, class discussions, audio and videotaped simulated interviews, 
demonstrations and practice sessions. Students' self-evaluations of 
their performance in videotaped simulated interviews serve as primary 
learning tools. 

Prerequisite: HMSV 1100 and permission of the instructor. Students must 
pre-register in the semester prior to the course. 

Juvenile Justice 

'HMSV 2600 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

This course is designed to develop student awareness of past and 

contemporary philosophies, practices and paradoxes of juvenile 

justice. The course examines programmatic efforts for juveniles "in 

trouble with the law," and focuses on the relationships among the 

components of this system of justice. Class presentations and 

discussions are supplemented by current journal research, and panel 

discussions by practicing professionals. A supervised practicum (30 

hours) is encouraged. 

Prerequisite: HMSV 2000 

Services to Children 

'HMSV 2700 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

Students examine the variety of services available to children to 
support, supplement and substitute for the family. Students learn to 
understand the structure of the services provided and to explore the 
ethical dilemmas such services may create. 

Prerequisite: HMSV 1100 

Group Work 

'HMSV 2900 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

This core course focuses on group work in human services agencies 
and exposes students to the theories and techniques of working with 
clients in groups Students have opportunities to observe and co-lead 
simulated groups. A supervised practicum (30 hours) in an agency is required. 

Prerequisites: HMSV 1100, HMSV 2500 and permission of the instructor. 
Students must pre-reg/ster in the semester prior to the course. 

Addictive Behaviors 

'HMSV 2950 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

This course is designed for students who plan a career in the helping 

professions (including education), or who wish to understand the 

cognitive, emotional, social and biological correlates of alcohol and 

other drug abuse, or other addictive behaviors. A framework is 

presented for viewing such compulsive behaviors as part of a 

continuum from "normal" to "dysfunctional," and controversies in 

the field are discussed. Students will be exposed to models of 

addiction, a classification of drugs, prevention of alcohol and other 

drug abuse, and information necessary to work with clients who are 

affected by addiction, including assessment and diagnosis, modalities 

of treatment, the role of support groups and relapse prevention. In 

addition to lectures and class discussions students are required to 

attend community support group meetings and to participate in a 

community prevention project (e.g., the Great American 

Smokeout). 

Prerequisite: PSY 1100 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Human Services Administration 

*HMSV 3000 3 cr. 3 hr. ▲ • 

This course examines administrative functions and their relationship 

to organizational effectiveness and efficiency. The internal and 

external politics of agency survival are addressed, and theoretical 

concepts of management and leadership styles are explored. Lectures 

and class discussion are supplemented by panel discussions by 

practicing professionals, field-based classes, and current journal 

research. A supervised practicum (20 hours) in an agency is required. 

Prerequisite: HMSV 1100 

Working with the Aging 

'HMSV 3200 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

The course explores past as well as contemporary philosophies, 
practices and processes of working with the aging. Further, the course 
examines the various roles and practices utilized by social support 
networks in maintaining the social, psychological, and physical well- 
being of the aged. A supervised practicum (20 hours) is required. 

Prerequisites: HMSV 1100, HMSV 2500 

Community Based Corrections 

'HMSV 3300 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

This course examines the philosophy of community-based 

corrections from historical, legal, social and psychological 

perspectives. The essence of probation and parole and their 

administration are considered in conjunction with criminal justice 

issues and practices that affect the courts decision to allow 

community sanctions and supervision in lieu of incarceration. 

Contemporary trends and alternatives to traditional supervision are 

explored as well. A supervised practicum (20 hours) is encouraged. 

Prerequisite: HMSV 2000 

The Abuse and Neglect of Children 

'HMSV 3500 3 cr. 3 hr. ▲ • 

This course provides students with an overview of the maltreatment 
of children. Students will learn about the symptoms of the major 
types of maltreatment, the impact of abuse and neglect on child 
development, and the dynamics of abusing/neglectful families. They 
will also be asked to consider domestic violence and substance abuse 
as forms of maltreatment, and are invited to compare the abuse of 
children with the abuse of other populations such as the elderly. 
Students will become acquainted with the child protection system 
and how it helps children, from receiving reports and assessing cases 
to providing case management and treatment options for children 
and their families. In addition to being exposed to didactic material, 
students will be challenged to examine their own attitudes, 
prejudices and reactions to abused and neglected children, their 
families, and the system that strives to help them. 

Prerequisites: HMSV 1100, PSY 2200 or PSY 2210 

Social Welfare Policy 

'HMSV 3580 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

This course enables students to learn the importance of social 

welfare policy, the relationship of values to policy formulation, and 

how to analyze policy. Students apply this knowledge to income 

maintenance, poverty assistance programs, health and mental health 

care, housing and neighborhood living space, as well as to the 

general problems of service delivery. 

Prerequisite: HMSV 1100 



Assessment and Intervention 

'HMSV 3600 3 cr. 3 hr. ▲ • 

This core course expands on Interviewing Techniques and further 
provide practical experience in assessment skills and intervention 
strategies. The course approaches clients in context as members of 
families, schools and other groups. Special focus is given to (1) 
understanding family systems theory and how it can be applied to 
interventions with families and within schools and agencies, (2) 
developing a working understanding of the DSM IV classification 
system for mental disorders, including the ethical issues involved in 
diagnosing and choosing treatments for clients,- (3) designing 
behavioral interventions, and (4) applying a culturally sensitive 
perspective to working with clients. Repeated presentations of case 
studies will give students an appreciation of the experience of 

working with ongoing cases. 

Prerequisites: HMSV 1100, HMSV 2500, PSY 2200, PSY 2350 

and permission of the instructor. Students must pre-register 

in the semester prior to the course. 

Professional Issues in Human Services 

'HMSV 3700 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

This core course is designed to develop student awareness of the 
professional issues that affect the roles and responsibilities of human 
service workers, with particular emphasis on the supervisory 
relationship. Students explore the dilemmas and challenges that face 
the practitioner within the context of legally and ethically responsible 
human service work. A stronger knowledge is gained of the rights and 
responsibilities of client, human service worker and supervisor. 

Prerequisite: HMSV 1100 

Management of Case Process 

'HMSV 3800 4 cr. 3 hr. A • 

This core course focuses on the process of case management in a 
variety of human service settings. It is designed to provide the 
knowledge and practical skills necessary to collect, organize, 
interpret, and report on information related to clients' needs, 
functioning and progress, to establish and monitor service plans, to 
broker services, and to evaluate service provision. Examples of case 
management in schools, courts, hospitals, clinics, and other human 
service agencies will be provided. A supervised practicum (90-hours) in an 
approved setting is required. During this practicum, students will become 
familiar with the agency's philosophy and operation, including 
procedures and formats for data/information gathering, case 
reporting, case conference, record storage, release and transmittal, 
and procedures to ensure security and confidentiality of all case 
materials. This course meets the LA&S requirement for Writing for 

the Human Services major. 

Prerequisites: HMSV 1100, HMSV 2500, PSY 2200, PSY 2350 

and permission of the instructor. Students must pre-register 

in the semester prior to the course. 

Internship in Human Services 

'HMSV 4870-4880 6 cr. 15 hr. A • 

Students work in an agency 1 5 hours per 
year (6 credits per semester for two 
semesters). This placement begins only in 
September. 

*HMSV 4890 12 cr. 30 hr. A • 
A block placement of 30 hours per 
week for one semester, either Fall or 
Spring (12 credits, one semester). 
Internship is the structured 
experience that allows senior Human 
Services majors to integrate and 
apply skills and theory in a field- 
based setting under the supervision of 
a qualified professional. Placements 
may be direct service or 
administrative. Examples of the wide 
variety of settings include mental 
health agencies, social services, 
hospitals, prisons, family service 
agencies, probation departments, 



week throughout the school 
Key to Course Offerings 

Q: designates courses in the 
Quantitative Scientific Cluster 

I: the Ideas and Events Cluster 

B: the Human Behavior Cluster 

L: the Literature, Language 
and Arts Cluster 

C: Multicultural 

1D1S: Interdisciplinary courses 

Multicultural and interdisciplinary courses also 

fuljill a cluster designation. 

* Asterisk indicates that the course may 
be offered less than once evety two years. 

A Undergraduate Day School 

• Undergraduate Evening School 

Courees having a more narrow focus than 
those taught on a regular basis or courses 
being taught on an experimental basis can 
be taught as Topics" courses. These courses 
will be assigned numbers based on the 
student level forwhich they ate intended — 
first, second, third or fourth year. 



residential programs, nursing homes, community advocacy 
organizations, crisis centers, and human resource departments in 
businesses and other organizations. While in placement students 
participate in a weekly seminar on campus, in which they share their 
experiences and develop a heightened awareness of their placement 
site and the larger system of human services. 
Prerequisites: completion of all core courses in Human Services and successful 
completion of the Internship eligibility requirements. 
Students must have completed their prerequisites at least one semester before 
taking Internship and must pre-register with the Field Placement Office at the 
beginning of the semester before they plan to start placement. 

independent Study 

HMSV 4900 1-6 cr. 318 hr. A • 

Independent Study is offered by request to outstanding students of 
Junior or Senior standing and requires approval of the professor, the 
Human Services Review Committee, and the Chairperson of the 
Behavioral Sciences Department. Independent Study may take the 
form of special advanced readings or projects, or of problem 
formulation and research Under no circumstances is Independent 
Study substituted for regularly scheduled courses 

Directed Study 

HMSV 4975 1-6 cr. 318 hr. A • 

Industrial Technology 

Electric Systems and Circuits 

ITEC 1000 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

An introductory course providing an overview of electrical 
technology with respect to electric production, transmission, control 
and use. Basic electrical concepts are covered in a lab setting. 

Electronics I 

ITEC 1100 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

This course introduces the principles and techniques used to analyze 

and design linear circuits with an emphasis on DC circuits. 

Accompanying laboratory exercises support the material presented 

in class and introduce experimental techniques. 

Prerequisite: ITEC 1000. 

Metal Fabrication Systems 

ITEC 1200 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

The course studies mass production theory, systems, and procedures 
in metal working. 

Wood Fabrication Systems 

ITEC 1300 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

Fundamental woodworking techniques are studied as they relate to 
construction and manufacturing. Procedures are practiced through 
selected laboratory experiences. 

Materials Testing 

ITEC 1310 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

This class provides an overview of selected materials and their 
properties, including laboratory experiences designed to give 
students an understanding of materials testing. 

Construction Systems I 

ITEC 1320 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

The course will provide an overview and lab experience in 12 
selected construction standards institute components of the 
construction industry. Through focused lab experiences, students 
will develop competencies in using the tools, equipment, 
instruments and techniques essential in the selected areas. 

Technical Drawing 

ITEC 1400 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

This course includes lettering, dimensioning, orthographic 
projection, symbols, sectioning, isometric, and auxiliary views. 
Problem development and blueprint reading is stressed. 



Architectural Graphics 

ITEC 1450 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

An introduction to the techniques and understandings involved in 
the use of drawing as a way of communicating and developing 
architectural ideas. Drawing is studied as a tool of visualization, 
exploring and documenting architectural form, organization, the 
setting of buildings in the land and the quality of light. 

Graphic Arts Processes 

ITEC 1500 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

The course studies the production and evaluation of messages 
utilizing graphic arts processes. This includes graphic design, desktop 
publishing, camera work, stripping, platemaking, and offset press 
operations. 

Typography 

ITEC 1510 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

The origins of the alphabet, evolution of type, traditional 
typography, nomenclature, and classification of typefaces are 
studied. Emphasis is on planning layout, budget considerations,- 
dimensional coordination, proportion, and the grid system, 
copyfitting, markup, and proofreading, composition and computer 
and electronic publishing technology. 

Energy Systems I 

ITEC 1600 3cr.4hr. A 

The course studies solar and other forms of energy to supply 
household needs. Students build and test both commercial and 
laboratory made devices. 

Energy Resources and Environment 

ITEC 1650 3cr.4hr. A 

The Energy Resources and Environment course offers indepth 
knowledge of energy supplies and sources. The course treats in detail, 
topics as how rate of formation is slow than replacement, how energy 
sources could be best utilized, and to identify the technology 
associated with energy resources. The course will include some field 
trips. 

Evolution of Industrial Technology 

ITEC 1700 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course studies the history of industrial technology, and the 
qualifications, duties, and responsibilities of related careers. A field 
based pre-practicum experience is an integral part of this course. This 
experience may be in a school or industrial setting. I 

Technical Analysis 

ITEC 1710 3cr.3hr. A 

Applications of mathematics to a variety of technical areas including 
electronics and mechanics are explored. Topics covered include 
complex numbers, Lissajou figures, vectors, curve fitting, error 
analysis, and computer methods. 

Computers in industrial Technology 

ITEC 1720 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

This course familiarizes students with computers through 
presentation of selected hardware and software concepts. 
Opportunities for extensive hands-on practice with application 
programs are provided. 

Women in Science and Technology 

ITEC 2000 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

We will study the contributions to the advancement of science and 
technology made by a selected group of women For each of these 
women, we will examine her discipline, her contribution to the 
discipline, and site her in an appropriate historical and cultural 
setting I, C, IDIS 






COLLEGE CATALOG 



Electronics II 

ITEC 2100 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

This course continues to study the principles and techniques of 

circuit analysis and design with an emphasis on AC circuits. 

Electronic circuits employing discrete devices are introduced. 

Accompanying laboratory exercises reinforce concepts and 

introduce advanced measuring movements. 

Prerequisite: ITEC 1100. 

Laser Technology 

ITEC 2110 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

This course examines industrial applications of lasers. I covers laser 
principles and operating characteristics and treats the safety aspects of 
laser use. Selected applications illustrate the use of lasers in industry. 
Laboratory experiences reinforce the lecture material. 

Prerequisite: ITEC 1000. 

Advanced Metal Fabrication Systems 

ITEC 2200 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

Specialized processes in the metal working industry are studied. 
Laboratory experiences include performing operations with tool 
cutter grinders, indexing heads, numerical control millers, turret 
lathes, and tracer lathes. 

Prerequisite: ITEC 1200. 

Wood Products Manufacturing 

ITEC 2300 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

In this course emphasis is on the mass production of a product 
employing the development and use of jigs, fixtures, and other 
suitable mass production procedures. Appropriate methods of 
production management are employed. 

Prerequisite: ITEC 1300. 

Construction Systems II 

ITEC 2310 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

The course studies residential construction with emphasis on 

construction methods, practices and procedures. The materials, 

equipment, and techniques used to construct a structure are 

examined, and architectural problems related to construction are 

researched. The course is taken with ITEC 2400. 

Prerequisites: ITEC 1320. 

Architectural Drawing 

ITEC 2400 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

Students design a practical residential structure, conforming to 
standard practices and Building codes. Technical skills are developed 
enabling students to communicate ideas. Topics discussed and 
employed include materials of construction, history, and development 
of various styles, orientation of house on lot, loads, and design of 
structural members. Field trips are taken and available films are used 
for instruction. The course is taken with ITEC 2310. 

Prerequisite: ITEC 1400 or ITEC 1450. 

Computer Aided Drafting (CAD) 

ITEC 2410 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

Drafting techniques will be reviewed and applied while completing a 
series of exercises using computer assistance. An emphasis will be 
placed on drawings commonly experienced in fields of engineering 
and architecture. Major projects will allow individuals the opportunity 
to pursue interest topics. A background of computer experience is 
helpful, but not necessary. 

Prerequisite: ITEC 1400 or ITEC 1450; ITEC 1720 or permission. 

Theory of Architecture 

ITEC 2450 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

Architectural situations will be explored that illustrate design 
theories both traditional and contemporary. Accepted construction 
techniques will be selected that best fulfill design situations. 
Emphasized will be the difficulties confronting designers as they 
resolve problems of conflict. 

Prerequisite: ITEC 1320. 



Offset Lithography 

ITEC 2500 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

The students study the lithographic form of printing as it is used in 
modern industry. Computer graphics work stations will be used to 
produce electronically designed artwork. Laser printers and 
imagesetters will be used to output the offset film and negatives. The 
majority of the course is spent setting up and running offset presses. 
Concepts covered include printing line copy, halftones, and 
controlling ink density. 

Prerequisite: ITEC 1500. 

Graphic Design 

ITEC 2520 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

Students study the design and production of messages. Students 
prepare artwork and mechanicals using equipment found in the 
Industrial Technology Department. The technology of 

communications is also included. 

Prerequisite: ITEC 1500 (credit will NOT be given for both COMM 3810 and 

ITEC 2520.) 

Screen Printing 

ITEC 2550 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

Students work with all forms of screen printing stencils. Torn paper, 
hand-drawn, hand-cut, and photo-direct stencils will be used. 
Emphasis is on multiple color registration, using both hand and 
machine printing techniques. Computer graphics artwork may be 
used by students with computer experience. L 

Energy Systems II 

ITEC 2600 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

The course is limited to students who have demonstrated the ability 
and desire to continue the research and development of a promising 
solar energy system as initiated in ITEC 1600. 

Prerequisites: ITEC 1600. 

Power and Lighting Systems 

ITEC 2630 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

Power and Lighting Systems course offers indepth knowledge of 
effective, efficient illumination and retrofitting. The course treats in 
detail, many topics such as smart house, temporary service and collect 
building, lighting system, financial and occupant information and 
apply that to required light levels per room and address quality issues 
such as lamp identification, lighting circuits and lighting codes. 
Students will develop and present plans for specific lighting systems 
as a part of laboratory work. The course will include field trips to 
active sites and research facilities. 

Prerequisites: ITEC 1000. 

Man Technology Society 

ITEC 2700 3cr.3hr. ' A 

The course studies the universal characteristics of technology, 
including effects of technology on society and culture. Topics of 
interest are researched. I, ID1S 

Statics 

ITEC 2710 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course involves the study of laws 

of static equilibrium of real bodies. 

Topics examined are beam and 

structural analysis, friction, centroids, 

and moments of inertia. 

Prerequisite: ITEC 1710. 

Automated Manufacturing I 

ITEC 2730 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

Students are introduced to the 
essential technologies used in 
automated manufacturing through 
extensive practice in computer- 
controlled machining, robotics, and 
pneumatic and hydraulic control 



Key to Course Offerings 

Q: designates courses in the 
Quantitative Scientific Cluster 

I: the Ideas and Events Cluster 

B: the Human Behavior Cluster 

L: the Literature, Language 
and Arts Cluster 

C: Multicultural 

IDIS: Interdisciplinary courses 

Multicultural and interdisciplinary courses also 

juljill a cluster designation. 

* Asterisk indicates that the course may 
be offered less than once every two years. 

▲ Undergraduate Day School 

• Undergraduate Evening School 



systems. 

Prerequisite: ITEC 1720 or equivalent 



Courses having a more narrow focus than 
those taught on a regular basis or courses 
being taught on an experimental basis can 
be taught as Topics" courses. These courses 
will be assigned numbers based on the 
student level forwhich they are intended — 
first, second, third or fourth year. 



O.S.HA 

ITEC 2740 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the latest 
occupational safety and health standards and to provide opportunity 
for the student to perform practical inspections, complete reports, 
and recommend corrective measures to insure safety and healthful 
conditions. This is a basic O.S.HA 500 course. 

Plastics Technology 

ITEC 2750 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

The course is an investigation of the rapidly expanding area of 
plastics. Emphasis is on plastics production, their merits, and 
limitations. Tests are conducted to confirm reference data and to 
promote a better understanding of various plastics and products made 
from them. 

Designing and Planning 

ITEC 2900 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

Elements of product design are experienced through problem 
solving Drafting, human engineering, and product analysis are 
incorporated in design and construction of prototypes 
Prerequisites: fTEC 1710 and four of the appropriate freshman level courses. 

Electronics III 

ITEC 3100 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

This course further develops the concepts and techniques 

appropriate to the design and analysis of analog electronic circuits. 

It provides sufficient background for students who wish to elect 

upper-level electronics courses. 

Prerequisites: ITEC 2100. 

Digital Electronics 

ITEC 3110 3cr.4hr. A 

The course is an introduction to the techniques for analyzing and 

synthesizing digital circuits. Emphasis in design work is on IC 

technology 

Prerequisites: ITEC 3100. 

Control Theory 

ITEC 3120 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

The course is an introduction to control theory utilizing examples 
of mechanical, fluidic, electronic, and hybrid control systems 
Emphasis is on design, utilizing the project approach. 

Prerequisite: ITEC 3100. 

Machine Processes 

ITEC 3210 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

The course covers the design and fabrication of metal products 

utilizing machine tools, metalworking processes, and welding. 

Prerequisite: ITEC 2200. 

Product Modeling and Rendering 

ITEC 3220 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

A laboratory course focusing on the preparation of product 

renderings and the development of three dimensional models for 

presentation and analysis of design products, processes or systems. 

The course will cover the types and uses of renderings and models, 

techniques and standards in their development, and appropriate 

material representation. 

Prerequisite: junior status. 

Estimating and Bidding 

ITEC 3300 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

The principles of preparing comprehensive unit pricing and systems 

approach for construction is taught in this course. The emphasis is 

on detailed estimates in order to determine the scope and cost of 

each proposed design element. 

Prerequisite: fTEC 2400, ITEC 2310. 

Mechanical and Plumbing Systems 

ITEC 3310 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

The course surveys the principles of heating, ventilating, air 

conditioning, purification, and control systems. Emphasis is placed 

on electrical and electronic control and delivery systems, water feed 

delivery systems, and waste water disposal systems. 

Prerequisites: ITEC 2310, 2400. 



Construction Supervision 

ITEC 3320 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

This course enhances the student's understanding and skills for 
supervising a construction project. The emphasis is on coordinating 
all of the construction resources, including materials and manpower, 
needed for the successful completion of on-site structure. 

Prerequisites: ITEC 3300, 3410. 

Wood Technology 

ITEC 3330 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

Students are introduced to a series of industrial techniques through 
which lumber is used to produce products. Veneering, patternmaking, 
model building, finishing, laminating, and bending are some of the 
techniques explored. 

Prerequisite: ITEC 1300. 

Construction Systems III 

ITEC 3340 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

The course is a study of construction techniques and structural 
elements. Emphasis is placed on heavy construction procedures used 
in commercial and industrial projects. The course is taken with ITEC 
3410. 

Prerequisites: ITEC 2310, 2400. 

Engineering Drawing 

ITEC 3400 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

In this course students examine orthographic projection, 
intersections, developments, revolutions, axonometrics, assembly 
details, and pictorial drawings. 

Prerequisites: ITEC 1400, 2410. 

Drafting Commercial Structures 

ITEC 3410 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

Students develop and produce working drawings, demonstrations, 

information schedules, and portfolios related to the construction of 

non-residential properties. The course is taken with ITEC 3340. 

Prerequisites: ITEC 2400, 2310. 

Architectural Design I 

ITEC 3430 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

Designing living spaces will be emphasized during this studio 

session. The common problems presented by the multiple home 

activities of house cleaning and maintenance, storage, meal 

preparation and eating, personal hygiene, child rearing and aging, 

entertainment, safety, security, etc. will be within the purview of this 

study. The visual analysis of existing space will be emphasized. 

Ergonomics and human behavior will be important areas of 

consideration. 

Prerequisite: junior status. 

Advanced CAD 

ITEC 3450 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

Students study and use advanced Computer Aided Drafting 

techniques to create two- and three-dimensional surface and solid 

model drawings applicable to their ITEC concentration area Selected 

drawings and a term project are included in a student-developed 

portfolio. 

Prerequisite: ITEC 2410. 

Architectural Design II 

ITEC 3460 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

Select problems will be completed through which architectural 

fundamentals will be explored. Individual and group activities will 

introduce the topics of land site analysis and improvements,- 

structured forms and applied materials,- lighting and color 

considerations, the applications of scale and proportion, and the 

organization of space. Solutions will be presented in appropriate 

portfolio form. 

Prerequisite: ITEC 3430. 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Production Printing 

ITEC 3510 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

This course emphasizes plant layouts scheduling and production of 

contracted jobs. Four color process printing is emphasized. The 

course is designed to allow serious students to apply their previous 

instruction in a controlled, industrial setting. Enrollment is limited to 

ten students. 

Prerequisites: ITEC 2500. 

Printing Estimating and Production Coordination 

ITEC 3520 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course provides students with an opportunity to determine 

how to estimate printed products properly. Relationships between 

the estimating department, sales, customer service, order writing, 

and production departments are covered. 

Prerequisite: ITEC 2500. 

Energy Conservation Principles 

ITEC 3600 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

This laboratory course offers in-depth knowledge of energy 

efficiency, conservation retrofits, and choosing appropriate strategies. 

Cases are discussed regarding the reduction of energy losses and the 

application of energy conservation techniques for building control 

systems. Students develop and present plans for specific energy 

conservation projects that include field trips to sites and research 

facilities. 

Prerequisites: ITEC 1710, MATH 1300 or permission. 

Co-Generation and Waste Recovery 

ITEC 3650 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

The Co-generation and Waste Recovery Systems course will focus 
on analyzing engineering and co-generation systems to meet 
industrial process needs and use of reject heat to integrate with the 
production plant. The course will also cover responsibilities of co- 
generators and their interconnection cost. Students will run 
computer programs for metering practices and other metering 
options. 

Prerequisites: ITEC 1600, 2600. 

Fluid Power Technology 

ITEC 3700 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

This course introduces the student to applications of fluid power in 
a variety of industries. Topics covered include properties and 
behavior of liquids and gases, schematic diagrams for hydraulic and 
pneumatic circuits, component uses and characteristics, methods of 
controlling fluid power systems, circuit design and analysis, and uses 
of hydraulic/pneumatic systems in automated manufacturing. 

Quality Control 

ITEC 3710 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

The course studies the development and utilization of those 
statistical methods that enhance quality control within a 
manufacturing environment. Lab work includes the use of a variety 
of inspection instruments and small scale testing is done to generate 
data. 

Prerequisite: ITEC 1710. 

Automated Manufacturing II 

ITEC 3730 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

This course requires students to successfully integrate the 
technologies studied in Automated Manufacturing I into working 
CIM (Computer- Integrated Manufacturing) systems. 

Prerequisites: ITEC 2730. 

HAZWOPER 

ITEC 3740 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

This is an OSHA-approved hazardous waste operations and 
emergency response course (OSHA 1910.120). Topics covered 
include OSHA regulations for this area, exposure risks, material 
handling practices and equipment, decontamination procedures, and 
the requirements of OSHA 1910.120. 



Methods of Teaching Technology Education 

ITEC 3800 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course is designed to provide the prospective technology 

education teacher with a series of related academic, observational, 

and participatory experiences based on the fundamental elements of 

the teaching-learning process. Students develop, implement, and 

evaluate a variety of short-range instructional methods. A pre- 

practicum experience in a public technology education program is a 

requirement of the course to meet state regulations for licensure. 

Prerequisite: junior status. 

Curriculum Development in Technology Education 

ITEC 3810 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

During this course the student is presented experiences that relate 
directly to the development of a course of study. Students also have 
the opportunity to analyze and develop strategies pertaining to 
curriculum development. A pre-practicum experience in a public 
technology education program is a requirement of the course to meet 

state regulations for licensure. 

Prerequisite: Junior status. 

Production Planning and Control 

ITEC 3900 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

Theory and practice in the essentials necessary for the operation of a 
manufacturing or service facility are the main thrust of this course. 
Layout of production, line operations, time study requirements, and 
related work problems resulting in an economical and efficient 
operation are included. 

Prerequisites: junior status. 

Engineering Experimentation 

ITEC 3910 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

Using a series of open-ended projects, this course prepares the 

student to work independently in a variety of technical areas. Topics 

covered include: the creative process, research using technical 

literature, error analysis for single-sample and multi-sample 

experiments, types of instrumentation, and technical report writing. 

This course satisfies the junior-level writing requirement for industrial 

technology students. 

Prerequisite: junior status. 

Strength of Materials 

ITEC 3930 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

This course serves as an introduction to the behavior of real 
materials under the influence of forces and couples. Axial, shear, 
torsional, and flexural stresses and strains are determined. 

Prerequisites: ITEC 1710. 

Industrial Electronics 

ITEC 4100 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

The course studies the application of electronic principles to devices 
and equipment, involving thermoelectronics, photoelectronics, solid- 
state motor control, welding, etc. 

Prerequisite: ITEC 3100 and by permission of Instructor. 

Electronic Communications 
Systems 

ITEC 4110 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

The system and circuits utilized in 
electronic communications are 
studied, including both transmitters 
and receivers. Methods of 
modulation are discussed and 
television is utilized as a 




representative system. 
Prerequisite: ITEC 3100 and by permission 
of Instructor. 



Key to Course Offerings 

Q: designates courses in the 
Quantitative Scientific Cluster 

I: the Ideas and Events Cluster 

B: the Human Behavior Cluster 

L: the Literature, Language 
and Arts Cluster 

C: Multicultural 

1D1S: Interdisciplinary courses 

Multicultural and interdisaplinary courses also 

fulfill a cluster designation - 

* Asterisk indicates that the course may 
be offered less than once every two years. 

▲ Undergraduate Day School 

• Undergraduate Evening School 

Courses having a more narrow focus than 
those taught on a regular basis or courses 
being taught on an experimental basis can 
be taught as Topics" courses. These courses 
will be assigned numbers based on the 
student level for which they are intended — 
first, second, third or fourth year. 



Microprocessor-Based Control Systems 

ITEC 4120 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

This course covers both hardware and software. The hardware 
portion includes a necessary introduction to the microprocessor 
itself and emphasizes interfacing the use of microprocessors to affect 
control. The software portion provides a necessary skill level in 
machine language programming. 

Prerequisite: ITEC 3100. 

Seminar in Construction 

ITEC 4310 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

This course is open to students specializing in construction. The 
course deals with current trends and issues facing the construction 
industry at local, state, and federal levels. The emphasis is on utilizing 
available resources to solve current problems 

Prerequisites: ITEC 3300, 3320. 

Site Planning 

ITEC 4350 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

The scope of this study will entail the problems presented to a 

designer by an unimproved land site. Proper design concepts will be 

applied as techniques and materials are selected. Solutions will be 

presented in the form of drawings and estimated costs. Legalities 

relating to construction codes and zoning will be emphasized. 

Prerequisites: junior status. 

Descriptive Geometry 

*ITEC 4400 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

Descriptive Geometry is concerned with graphical representation 

and the problem solving using spatial relationship of points, lines, 

and planes by means of projections. 

Prerequisite: ITEC 3400. 

Architectural Professional Practices 

ITEC 4470 3cr.4hr. A 

A study will be made of the various office forms, procedures, and 

protocol through which the practice of architecture is organized. 

Topics will include the personal ethical and legal interrelationships 

between other professionals, property owners, and the skilled trades 

Legal forms and procedures common to the profession will be 

introduced. 

Prerequisite: senior status. 

Process Color Separation 

ITEC 4500 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

In this course students experience scanning color photographs 

directly into electronic publishing systems. Using the electronic 

publishing hardware and software the images are manipulated and 

merged to create completed printing negatives. The electronic files 

and negatives are proofed using a variety of color printers and color 

keys. 

Prerequisite: ITEC 2500. 

Seminar in Graphic Arts 

ITEC 4520 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

In the seminar students study and discuss current trends, issues, 

problems, and technical material in graphic arts. Emphasis is placed 

on comprehending why the trends must take place and how the 

emerging technology allows the trends to happen. Students are able 

to project future technical trends within the graphic area. 

Prerequisite: ITEC 2500. 

Performance Contracting 

ITEC 4600 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

The course is designed to provide students the guidance to use the 

performance contracting energy financing/service mechanism 

effectively and provide an excellent mechanism to bring economy, 

energy and the environment into appropriate perspective. The first 

half of the course builds an understanding of the options available 

and then walks through each step to effectively secure performance 

contracting services. The second half applies the material from the 

first half to different market segments i.e. the federal government 

and utilities from end-user's point of view. Students will present and 

discuss their reports in class. 

Prerequisites: ITEC 1600, 2600, 3600. 



Project Management 

ITEC 4700 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

The objective of this course is to present and discuss the 
management of different projects The projects usually involve a 
great deal of time and expense. So close management control is 
required if they are to be completed within the established time and 
cost limitations The course also develops and discusses management 
techniques towards the control of cost, time and project finance 
during the project process. 

Seminar in Facilities Management 

ITEC 4750 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

Seminar in Facilities Management offers in-depth knowledge of 
current topics and sources. The course treats, in detail, many topics 
such as Planning and Performance Criteria, Design, Procurement 
and Construction. At times, it can be advantageous for an owner to 
negotiate a contract for its project with a preselected contractor. 
This course will cover the different negotiating contracts and will 
include some field trips. 

Pre-practicum and Seminar 

ITEC 4840 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The seminar gives students the opportunity to formulate concepts 
of technology education and develop a working knowledge of 
principles and practices of technology education administration. Pre- 
practicum experiences are also included. The course meets the state 
requirement for certification. 

Prerequisites: ITEC 3800, 3810. 

Practicum in Technology Education 

ITEC 4860 10 cr. 30 hr. A 

The Practicum provides experience in planning and implementing 
instructional strategies in a public-school setting. A self-evaluation is 
required. The Practicum meets the state requirement for certification. 

Prerequisite: permission of Instructor. 

Internship in Industrial Technology 

ITEC 4960 12 cr. 36 hr. A 

In the Internship students participate in an industrial experience 
with the approval of the Industrial Technology faculty. 

Independent Study 

ITEC 4900 3 cr. A 

The Independent Study allows students to enroll in a directed study. 

Directed Study 

ITEC 4975 1-6 cr. A 



Interdisciplinary 



Each student is required to complete at least two interdisciplinary 
courses as part of the Common Graduation Requirements in the 
Liberal Arts and Sciences Program. These courses are often described 
in the discipline most closely associated with the interdisciplinary 
course This section gives complete course descriptions for the 
interdisciplinary course or refers to specific areas for descriptions if 
they are located in other sections. 

History of Architecture 

ART 1300 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

See ART 1300.1, L, C, IDIS 

Art Criticism 

ART 3100 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

See ART 3100. L, C, IDIS 

Literature and Disability 

ENGL 2300 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

See ENGL 2300. L, B, IDIS 

Literature and Film 

ENGL 2330 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

See ENGL 2330. L, IDIS 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



French Civilization 

FREN 3000 3cr.3hr. A 

See GEOG 1000. I, L, C, IDIS 

introduction to Geography 

GEOG 1000 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

See GEOC 1000. I, IDIS 

Economic Geography 

GEOG 3000 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

See GEOG 3000. I, C, IDIS 

History of Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean 

HIST 2700 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

See HIST 2700. 1, C, IDIS 

History of South America 

HIST 2750 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

See HIST 2750. I, C, IDIS 

Introduction to Women's Studies 

IDIS 1000 3 cr. 3hr. A • 

The course is a cross-cultural, historical, and interdisciplinary 
introduction to topics and themes in women's experiences, including 
roles in the family, the work force, and public life. L, I, B, C 

Women in Latin America 

IDIS 1100 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

Through autobiographies, literature, and films, students examine a 
multicultural and interdisciplinary view of the social, political, and 
economic situation of contemporary Latin American women. 

Introduction to International Studies 

IDIS 1200 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The purpose of this survey course is to acquaint students with the 
field of international studies in the context of contemporary global 
change. Through lectures, films, performances, and readings, the 
student gains perspective on some very rapid and important 
international political-economic transformations and cultural changes. 
I,L,C 

Creative Arts 

IDIS 1300 3 cr. 3 hr. • 

Participants acquire basic skills in music, movement, visual art, and 
language with which they create personal and group works. A final 
project demonstrating these skills as well as attendance, outside 
readings, and final exam are required. L 

Global Issues 

IDIS 1800 3 cr. 3hr. A • 

This course examines the interdependency of the world's nations by 
focusing on current events in the international area and issues such as 
ozone depletion, pollution, the global economy, conflict and 
cooperation, population, and hunger. I, C, IDIS 

Introduction to Peace Studies 

IDIS 1900 3 cr. 3 hr. 

In this introduction to the field of Peace Studies, through an inter- 
disciplinary approach, the students will explore conflict — its origins, 
management, ramifications, and attempts to move beyond it. Conflict 
will be explored on the individual, group, national, and international 
levels. I, IDIS 

Women in Science and Technology 

IDIS 2000 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

We will study the contributions to the advancement of science and 
technology made by a selected group of women. For each of these 
women, we will examine her discipline, her contribution to the 
discipline, and site her in an appropriate historical and cultural 
setting. I, C, IDIS 

Dilemmas of Peace and War 

IDIS 2100 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

This introductory-level course is an interdisciplinary study of the 
issues of peace and war. it interweaves history, political science, 
philosophy, literature, and psychology through readings, discussions, 
lectures, media, and class presentations. I, L, C, IDIS 



Issues in Women's Health 

IDIS 2340 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course offers a multicultural and interdisciplinary examination 
of women's health issues and problems, including socialization, self- 
esteem, sexuality, birth control, substance abuse and violence. I, B, 

IDIS, C 

Note: tfminoring in Women's Studies see advisor for course sequence. 

Caribbean Cultures 

IDIS 2400 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course introduces the culture, politics, economy, and natural 
history of the Caribbean, and the relation of these facets to the 
culture of our students. L, C, IDIS, I 

Culture and Society of India 

IDIS 2500 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course explores developments in India's cultural heritage, 
historical epochs, religious traditions, and socio-political movements 
from antiquity to the present. Class work involves numerous readings 
of articles on select topics and writing. I, C, IDIS, B 

Prerequisite: Writing II. 

Man, Society, and Technology 

IDIS 2700 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course studies universal characteristics of technology, including 
effects of technology on society and culture. Topics of interests are 
researched. I, IDIS, B 

Seminar in the Humanities 

IDIS 4000 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course is a capstone experience for students in Interdisciplinary 
Studies Humanities. Students review research findings and integrate 
selected humanities areas. This research culminates into a final 
research paper and classroom presentation. 

Adaptations 

PHED 3050 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

(See PHED 3050) Q, IDIS 

Commonwealth of the Arts 

MUSC 2000 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

(See MUSC 2000) L, I, B, C, IDIS 

Commonwealth of the Ancient Arts 

MUSC 2100 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

(See MUSC 2100) L, I, C, IDIS 

Logic 

PHIL 1100 3cr.3hr. A • 

(See PHIL 1100) Q, L IDIS 

Philosophy of Human Nature 

PHIL 2600 3cr.3hr. ▲• 

(See PHIL 2600) I, B, IDIS 

Contemporary Philosophy 

PHIL 3340 3cr.3hr. A 

(See PHIL 3340) I, IDIS 

Marxism 

PHIL 4430 3cr.3hr. A 

(See PHIL 4430) I, IDIS 

Dostoevsky and Tolstoy 

RUSS 2400 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

(See RUSS 2400) L, I, C, IDIS 

Physiological Psychology 

PSY 3420 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

(See PSY 3420) B, Q, IDIS 

Russian Literature in English 
Translation 

RUSS 2500 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

(See RUSS 2500) L, I, C, IDIS 

Russian Life and Culture 

RUSS 2600 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

(See RUSS 2600) L, I, C, IDIS 



Key to Course Offerings 

Q: designates courses in the 
Quantitative Scientific Cluster 

1: the Ideas and Events Cluster 

B: the Human Behavior Cluster 

L: the Literature, Language 
and Arts Cluster 

C: Multicultural 

IDIS: Interdisciplinary courses 

Multicultural and interdisciplinary counts also 

fulfill a clustr designation. 

* Asterisk indicates that the course may 
be offered less than once every two years. 

▲ Undergraduate Day School 

• Undergraduate Evening School 

Courses having a more narrow focus than 
those taught on a regular basis or courses 
being taught on an experimental basis can 
be taught as Topics" courses. These courses 
will be assigned numbers based on the 
student level for which they are intended — 
first, second, third or fourth year. 



Race and Ethnic Relations 

SOC 2500 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

(See RUSS 2500) B, I, C, IDIS 

Social Stratification 

SOC 3000 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

(See SOC 3000) B, I, C, IDIS 

Women in American Society 

SOC 3770 3cr.3hr. A 

(See SOC 3770) B, C, IDIS 

Independent Study 

IDIS 4900 3 cr. A 

Directed Study 

IDIS 4975 1-6 cr. A 



Italian 



Italian for Beginners I 

ITAL 1000 3 cr. 3hr. A • 

The correct pronunciation, reading ability, and fundamentals of 
grammar and syntax of the Italian language are studied. Students are 
taught the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and 
writing. Cultural topics are integrated with these skills. Italian 
gradually becomes the working classroom language. Students with a 
year or more of high school Italian should register for Italian 2000. 
L, C 

Italian for Beginners II 

ITAL 1100 3cr.3hr. A 

The course is a continuation of ITAL 1000 or is taken with 
permission of Instructor. L, C 

Intermediate Italian I 

ITAL 2000 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course focuses on a discussion of advanced grammar points and 

readings dealing with Italian life. Emphasis is on developing 

conversational fluency. L, C 

Prerequisite: ITAL 1000 permission of Instructor. 

Intermediate Italian II 

ITAL 2100 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course is a continuation of ITAL 2000 or is taken by permission 
of Instructor L, C 

Italian Culture (in English) 

ITAL 2200 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course provides an introduction to Italian culture. Although 
the course is taught in English, a brief introduction to the Italian 
Language, "Italian for Travelers", will open the course to benefit 
students interested in the Italian language or those traveling in the 
country. A brief introduction to Italian geography, art, architecture, 
music, literature, film and history provides background information 
on Italy. L, C 

Independent Study in Italian 

ITAL 4901-4903 1-3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The Independent Study is open to students in the language with the 
permission of the supervising Instructor and the Department Chair. 
Meeting times and credit are arranged upon request. 



Leadership Academy 

Honors Program 

Our Many Communities Colloquium 

LEAD 1000 1 cr. 1 hr. A 

The first Honors Colloquium stresses the theme of leadership, 
especially within the contexts of our campus and the local 
community. It provides a practical as well as intellectual orientation 
toward the immediate world we live in at Fitchburg State. The 
course will provide an introduction to the functions of college 
governance and local city government. Students will study 
leadership not merely from a theoretical perspective but also in real 
world contexts. I 

Foundations of Leadership I 

LEAD 1005 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course focuses on what it means to be leaders in today's world. 
Students will study different theories of leadership as they apply to 
leaders, followers, and situations and will have opportunities to 
observe and apply these theories in real-life situations. Students will 
also be introduced to some basic psychological research methods and 
will use these methods to complete several small leadership projects. 
B 

Foundations of Leadership II 

LEAD 1010 3 cr. 3hr. A 

The second course in the leadership sequence focuses on learning to 
be an effective leader The main objective of this course is to teach 
students leadership skills including listening, negotiating, building 
consensus, working with resistance and conflict, problem solving, 
assertiveness, giving and receiving feedback, and motivating others. 
Students will study interpersonal and group theory and apply these 
theories to leadership situations in laboratory and community 
settings. This course will culminate in an applied on-campus group 
leadership project. B 

Service Learning Project 

LEAD 1025 1 cr. 1 hr. A 

This Service Learning Project is basic to a citizen leader's 
preparation. Students will do a thirty-hour practicum at community 
agencies, neighborhood organizations, schools, businesses or other 
settings deemed appropriate for service learning Students will work 
in service teams under the aegis of both site and college supervisors. 
This structured learning environment will allow students to 1) 
become familiar with their community, 2) work with people on the 
teams as well as with people at the site, 3) learn and use skills for 
responsible citizenship and 4) develop their sense of civic 
responsibility. The college supervisor will hold a seminar once a 
week for students in the field. Topics of the seminar will relate to 
students' experiences in the agencies as well as to students' progress 
in recognizing the impact of their contributions. B 
Prerequisite: LEAD (000 

Honors English I 

LEAD 1050 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course encourages the development of each student's writing, 
independent reading and research abilities Concepts and expressions 
of leadership in the classical and romantic traditions in literature and 
the fine arts will be emphasized. Fictional and non-fictional literature 
will be examined from various class, cultural, gender, historical, 
literary and political perspectives. 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Leadership in the Outdoors 

LEAD 1140 1 cr. 1 hr. A 

(PHED 1140) 

Leadership in the Outdoors is a course designed for students in the 
Leadership Academy. Experiential by design, the course provides 
students an opportunity to experience and practice a variety of 
leadership styles through participation in outdoor adventure activities 
such as: a confidence course, initiative games, orienteering, canoeing 
and mountain hiking. The inquiry and analysis for the different types 
of leadership styles will be conducted for both the individual student 
and the entire class. An overnight camping trip will culminate the 
Leadership in the Outdoor course. 

The Changing World I (19th Century) 

LEAD 1150 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course presents an overview of how the world changed during 
the 19* century. Built upon a historical framework within the context 
of global economy and hegemony, it will introduce students to the 
lingering implications of such themes as the Industrial Revolution, 
Nationalism in the West, Imperialism in Asia and Africa, and the 
globalization of economy and communication. It will explore how 
European political and industrial power impacted the Afro-Asian 
nations, but more importantly how it sustained their own expanding 
European industries and economy. I, C, IDIS 

Honors English II 

LEAD 1200 3cr.3hr. A 

This course is a continuation of Honors English I and emphasizes 
writing, independent reading and research Students examine varieties 
of leadership in the personal narratives of cultural, intellectual and 
political leaders, the analyses of social critics and theorists and in 
works of fiction. We will examine works from various class, cultural, 
gender, historical, literary, and political perspectives. The diversity of 
texts affords students opportunities to develop strategies for the 
interpretation and analysis of different kinds of source material and to 
evaluate the concept of "leadership" in many contexts. 

The Changing World II (20th Century) 

LEAD 1250 3cr.3hr. A 

The focus of this course will be on the dramatic changes which took 
place during the 20 th century. Drawing upon the disciplines of 
History and Political Science, it will trace the political, social, and 
economic significance of such topics as the rise of fascism and 
communism, the "Pax Americana," the Nuclear Age, the rise of 
National Liberation Movements in the Third World, the collapse of 
communism, and ongoing globalization as we approach the new 
millennium. Through its exploration of the forces which shaped the 
20 lh century, the students will learn not only about the world 
around them, but also about the world which will be entering the 
21* century. I, C, IDIS 

Leaders in the Humanities: The 19* century 

LEAD 2000 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

An interdisciplinary study of art, music, philosophy and literature 
from Classicism and Neo-Gassicism through Post Impressionism, 
including the movements of Romanticism, Post-Romanticism, Realism 
and Impressionism. Emphasis will be placed upon the leaders of the 
above movements within their disciplines. L, IDIS 

Colloquium: Leaders in the Humanities (19 th century) 

LEAD 2001 1 cr. 1 hr. A 

This colloquium complements Leaders in the Humanities: The 19 ,h 
century by emphasizing research techniques for the humanities. 
Students will learn to do research using a variety of primary and 
secondary sources. They will also learn how to present their research 
in a variety of media. L, IDIS 



Consumer Health 

LEAD 2030 1 cr. 2 hr. A 

This course is designed to help the student evaluate health 
information critically, and select products and services wisely. The 
past, present, and future of quackery is explored especially in the 
areas of food, cosmetics, and chronic disorders. Laws and protection 
agencies, both governmental and private, are surveyed. 

Leaders in the Humanities: 20 th century 

LEAD 2050 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

An interdisciplinary and multicultural study of art, music, 
philosophy and literature from 1890 to 1995 in Europe and the 
United States. Periods covered include French Post Impressionism, 
Fauvism and Cubism, German Expressionism, Spanish and French 
Surrealism, Early American Modernism, the Harlem Renaissance, 
Regionalism and Jazz, Abstract Expressionism, Pop Art, Earthworks 
and contemporary trends. Emphasis will be placed upon the leaders 
of the above movements within their disciplines. L, IDIS 

Colloquium: Leaders in the Humanities (20 th century) 

LEAD 2051 1 cr. 1 hr. A 

This colloquium complements Leaders in the Humanities: The 20 lh 
century and continues the development of research techniques for the 
humanities. Students will expand their understanding of primary and 
secondary source materials and further develop their presentation 
skills. L, IDIS 

Physics, Mathematics and Technology 

LEAD 3000 4 cr. 5 hr. A 

This course will introduce the principal ideas and the development 
of modern 20 lh century physics along with its foundations in 
mathematics. After historical review of the development of ideas from 
Newton's laws through 19' h century physics, aspects of quantum 
mechanics will be addressed. These include the wave-particle duality 
of nature, the Uncertainty Principle, the probabilistic nature of the 
Universe, and Einstein's Special and General Theories of Relativity. 
Q, IDIS 
Prerequisite: MATH 1250 or 1300 or high school math equivalency. 

Biology, Mathematics and Technology 

LEAD 3050 4 cr. 6 hr. A 

This course will address current issues such as the Human Genome 
mapping project, the spread and control of disease, population 
growth, and environmental concerns. Each of these topics requires a 
clear understanding of the mathematics behind the biological 
questions. A case-study approach and investigative activities that use 
laboratory experiments and computer simulations in concert with 
more traditional presentations will provide the focus for addressing 
these topics These investigations will illustrate broader mathematical 
and biological concepts while engaging the students in problem 
solving, planning, decision making, and group discussions. Q, L, IDIS 

Colloquium: Biology, Mathematics and Technology 

▲ 



LEAD 3051 1 cr. 1 hr. 

The third year colloquium will 
emphasize the societal, ethical and 
moral issues related to scientific 
advances. Specific topics will follow 
closely those being presented in 
Biology, Mathematics, and 
Technology. Students will be 
expected to express their viewpoints 
through class discussion and a 
personal journal Effective debating 
and good listening skills will be 
taught and cultural differences in 
beliefs and practices will be discussed 
Q, IDIS 



Key to Course Offerings 

Q : designates courses in the 
Quantitative Scientific Cluster 

I: the Ideas and Events Ouster 

B: the Human Behavior Cluster 

L: the Literature, Language 
and Arts Cluster 

G Multicultural 

IDIS: Interdisciplinary courses 

Multicultural and interdisciplinary courses also 

fulfill a cluster designation. 

* Asterisk indicates that the course may 
be offered less than once every two years. 

▲ Undergraduate Day School 

• Undergraduate Evening School 

Courses having a more narrow focus than 
those taught on a regular basis or courses 
being taught on an experimental basis can 
be taught as 'Topics" courses These courses 
will be assigned numbers based on the 
student level for which they are intended — 
first, second, third or fourth year. 



Independent Study in Leadership 

LEAD 4900 6 cr, 6 hr. ▲• 

The Independent Study is open to students in the Leadership 
Academy or Leadership Studies minor with the permission of the 
supervising Instructor and the Coordinator of the Leadership 
Academy. Meeting times and credit are arranged upon approval. 

Senior Thesis/ Project/ Research 

LEAD 4990 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course is for Leadership Academy students completing the 
senior requirement. Topics are approved by the thesis committee, 
coordinator, and advising professor. The course of study, meetings, 
and credit are arranged with the advisor. 

Senior Thesis/ Project/ Writing 

LEAD 4991 3 cr. 3 hr. A 



Mathematics 



Basic Mathematics I 

MATH 0100 3 inst. cr. 4 hr. ▲ • 

This class serves as a review of basic arithmetic skills and an 
introduction to elementary algebra. 

Basic Mathematics II 

MATH 0200 3 inst. cr. 4 hr. ▲ • 

The course serves as a continuation of Basic Mathematics 1. 

Concepts studied range from Elementary Algebra through quadratic 

equations. 

Note 1 : Institutional Credits (inst. cr.) do not count toward 

graduation. 

Note 2: All students must pass the Math Placement Exam or 

MATH 0200 before they are permitted to take any of the 

following mathematics courses. 

Finite Mathematics 

MATH 1200 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

In this course a variety of discrete mathematical models are 
developed and applied to business and to the social and life sciences. 
Topics covered are chosen from matrices, linear programming, 
probability, financial models and game theory. Q 

Introduction to Functions 

MATH 1250 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

This course provides a study of mathematical functions, graphing 
techniques, and applications. The functions covered in the class are 
linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic. 
Credit is not awarded for both MATH 1 250 and MATH 1 300. Q 

Precalculus 

MATH 1300 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

This course prepares students for the study of calculus. Topics 
covered include real numbers, equations and inequalities, analytic 
geometry, as well as polynomial, rational, trigonometric, exponential, 
and logarithmic functions. Credit is not awarded for both MATH 
1250 and MATH 1300. Q 

Mathematics Across the Curriculum 

MATH 1400 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course introduces students to a variety of topics in applied 
mathematics chosen from population modeling, financial modeling, 
measurement, growth and form, linear programming, social decision 
making, and graph theory. The course is required for Elementary 
Education majors and Middle School Education majors. Q, IDIS 

Applied Statistics 

MATH 1700 3cr.3hr. A* 

Methods of data collection, organization, and interpretation, 
sampling, probability, estimation, and testing are applied to areas 
including biology, business, medicine, economics, and education. 
Credit is not awarded for both MATH 1 700 and MATH 1 800. Q 



Business Statistics 

MATH 1800 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

Topics covered in this course include descriptive methods, probability 
distributions, estimation, testing, analysis of variance, and regression 
analysis. (Credit is not awarded for both MATH 1 700 and MATH 
1800.) Q 

Prerequisite: MATH 1250 or MATH 1300. 

Discrete Mathematics 

MATH 1900 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

This course introduces discrete mathematics as applied to computer 
science. Topics covered include Boolean logic, elementary set theory, 
functions, relations, enumeration, proof techniques, number systems 
and trees. Q 

(Credit is not given for both CSC 1900 and MATH 1900.) 
Prerequisite: Math 1250 or Math 1300 or equivalent knowledge. 

Informal Geometry 

MATH 2000 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course involves an intuitive study of basic geometric objects 
and concepts. Topics studied vary, but are chosen for their intuitive 
appeal as well as their geometric significance. Q 

Calculus for Business 

MATH 2200 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

This course surveys methods and applications of the calculus for 

functions of one variable, which are useful in business and 

economics. Topics include differentiation with applications to rates 

and maximum and minimum values, integration techniques with 

applications to areas, cost, and rates (Credit is not awarded for both 

MATH 2200 and MATH 2300.) Q 

Prerequisite: MATH 1250 or MATH 1300. 

Calculus I 

MATH 2300 4 cr. 5 hr. A • 

The derivative of a function, methods of differentiation, and 

applications are studied. This course includes a computer laboratory 

component using computer algebra software. (Credit is not awarded 

for both MATH 2200 and MATH 2300.) Q, 

Prerequisite: MATH 1300 or its equivalent 

Calculus II 

MATH 2400 4 cr. 5 hr. A • 

The course involves the study of the Riemann Integral, methods of 
integration, and applications. This course includes a computer 
laboratory component using computer algebra software. Q, 

Prerequisite: MATH 2300 or its equivalent. 

Introduction to Mathematical Thought 

MATH 2500 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course is intended to introduce mathematics as the science of 
reasoning. Topics covered include elementary set theory, logic, 
mathematical induction, axiomatic systems, and techniques of proof 
with applications in areas such as equivalence relations, modular 
arithmetic, function properties, and graph theory. Q, Intro 

Prerequisite: MATH 1300 or its equivalent. 

Linear Algebra 

MATH 2600 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

In this course topics covered include the application of vector 

spaces, linear transformations, and matrices. Q 

Prerequisite: MATH 2300. 

Applied Statistics II 

*MATH 2700 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

This course is a continuation of MATH 1700. Topics covered 

include estimation and testing, simple linear and multiple regression, 

analysis of variance, and nonparametric methods. Q 

Prerequ/s/te: MATH 1700 or MATH 1800. 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Introduction to Secondary School Teaching 

MATH 2860 3cr.3hr. A 

This course is required of all students preparing for initial license at 
the secondary level. It is a sophomore level course for full-time 
undergraduates and the first course taken by transfer students. It is 
taught at the local high school and is a clinical laboratory experience. 
This course includes a 25-hour prepracticum requirement and is a 
prerequisite for other certification course requirements. Students 
become familiar with the complexities of secondary school teaching 
and its demands. The course gives faculty the opportunity to screen 
students and give students the opportunity to test their commitment 
to teaching. 

Geometry 

MATH 3000 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course involves a formal study of basic concepts in geometry 

and the foundations of Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry This 

course is for mathematics majors or minors and students with a 

mathematics specialization — all others need permission from the 

Instructor. 

Prerequisites: MATH 2400, 2600. 

Discrete Algebraic Structures 

MATH 3100 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course introduces discrete algebraic structures of interest in 

computer science. Topics covered are chosen from partial orders, 

Boolean algebra, graph theory, and finite state machines. Q 

Prerequisite: MATH 2600. 

Elementary Number Theory 

MATH 3150 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course involves the study of the properties of the integers. 
Topics covered include divisibility, prime numbers, congruences, 
Diophantine equations, cryptography, mathematical induction, and 
computational number theory. 

Prerequisite: MATH 2500. 

History of Mathematics 

MATH 3200 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The development of mathematical ideas and methods from ancient 
to modern times and their relevance to other fields of knowledge is 
studied. This course is intended for mathematics majors, mathematics 
minors, or mathematics specialists. 

Prerequisite: MATH 2400. 

Calculus Hi 

MATH 3300 3 cr. 3 hr. ▲ • 

Course topics include conic sections, indeterminate forms, Taylor 
polynomials, infinite and power series, differentials, and multiple 
integrals. Q, Intro 

Prerequisite: MATH 2400. 

Calculus IV 

MATH 3400 3 cr. 3 hr. ▲ • 

The calculus of polar coordinates, parametric curves, vector valued 
functions, quadratic surfaces, and directional derivatives are studied. 
Double integrals in polar coordinates, line integrals, and differential 
equations may also be considered. Q 

Prerequisite: MATH 3300. 

Ordinary Differential Equations 

MATH 3550 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

Students examine linear first and second order differential equations, 
methods of solution, and applications. Series solutions and higher 
order linear equations are considered. 

Prerequisites: MATH 2600 and 3300. 

Introduction to Mathematical Logic 

*MATH 3600 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course serves as an elementary introduction to classical and 
symbolic logic, including standard sentential and first order predicate 
calculi. 

Prerequisite: MATH 2500 or MATH 2300. 



Mathematics Seminar 

MATH 3900 1 cr. 1.5 hr. A 

The Seminar provides the opportunity for problem solving and 
research on one or more topics outside the core curriculum areas. May 
be repeated once. 

Real Variable Theory 

'MATH 4000 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course covers rigorous treatment of the foundations of 
differential and integral calculus with such topics as the real numbers, 
continuity, metric, and Euclidean spaces. 

Prerequisites: MATH 2600 and MATH 3300. 

Topology 

'MATH 4050 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

Topics covered include: point sets, metric spaces, topological spaces, 
connectedness, and compactness. 

Advanced Multivariate Calculus 

MATH 4150 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The differential and integral calculus of vector valued functions and 
functions of several variables are examined. 

Prerequisites: MATH 2600, 3400. 

Probability and Statistics I 

MATH 4200 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course involves a careful development of elementary probability 
theory with applications followed by the study of discrete and 
continuous random variables, including the binomial, Poisson, and 
normal. Q 

Prerequisite: MATH 3300. 

Probability and Statistics II 

MATH 4250 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

Random variables and their probability distributions are used to study 
problems in estimation, hypothesis testing, regression, and analysis of 
variance. 

Prerequisite: MATH 4200. 

Abstract Algebra 

MATH 4300 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course introduces algebraic structures, including groups, rings, 

and fields 

Prerequisites: MATH 2500 or permission of Instructor, and MATH 2600. 

Complex Analysis 

MATH 4350 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course covers the following topics: the complex number 
system, the analysis of complex functions, analytic functions, 
integration, series, contour integration, and conformal mappings. 

Prerequisite: MATH 3300. 

Operations Research 

MATH 4400 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course covers the following topics: linear programming, duality, 

networks, transportation problems, dynamic programming, and 

stochastic models. Q 

Prerequisites: MATH 2600 and MATH 2400. 



Mathematical Modeling 

MATH 4450 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

Deterministic and probabilistic 
models from the physical, social, and 
life sciences are studied. The course 
emphasizes the uses of mathematics, 
rather than the acquisition of new 
mathematical knowledge. New 
mathematical ideas are introduced 
only when they aid in the study of a 
particular application. Q 

Prerequisites: MATH 2400, 2600. 




Key to Course Offerings 

Q : designates courses in the 
Quantitative Scientific Cluster 

I: the Ideas and Events Ouster 

B: the Human Behavior Cluster 

L: the Literature, Language 
and Arts Cluster 

C: Multicultural 

IDIS: Interdisciplinary courses 

Multicultural and interdisciplinary courses also 

fulfill a cluster designation. 

* Asterisk indicates that the course may 
be offered less than once every two years. 

▲ Undergraduate Day School 

• Undergraduate Evening School 

Courses having a more narrow focus than 
those taught on a regular basis or courses 
being taught on an experimental basis can 
be taught as Topics" courses. These courses 
will be assigned numbers based on the 
student level for which they are intended — 
first, second, third or fourth year. 



Numerical Analysis 

MATH 4500 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

Numerical analysis is concerned with devising algorithms for 

approximating the solutions to mathematically expressed problems. 

Topics are chosen from: round off error and computer arithmetic, 

solutions of algebraic and transcendental equations, interpolation 

and polynomial approximation, numerical differentiation and 

integration, solutions of ordinary differential equations, solutions of 

linear systems, and approximation theory. Both mathematical rigor 

and computer solutions are stressed. 
Prerequisites: MATH 2600, 3300, programming ability in a numerical program 

language. 

Methods and Materials in Secondary Mathematics 

MATH 4850 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The curriculum and pedagogy of secondary school mathematics is 

studied. The uses of technology in the teaching of secondary 

mathematics will be emphasized. The course includes a 30 hour pre- 

practicum of professional experiences. 

Prerequisites: MATH 2400 and 2600; MATH 2860 or ENGL 4700. 

Mathematics Practicum in a Secondary School 

MATH 4860 6 cr. A 

Students are assigned to cooperating schools for one-half of one 

semester of student teaching. 

Prerequisite: permission of the department 

Mathematics Practicum in a Secondary School II 

MATH 4870 6 cr. A 

Students are assigned to cooperating schools for one-half semester 

of student teaching. 

Prerequisites: MATH 4860 and permission of the department. 

independent Study 

MATH 4900 1, 2, 3 cr. 

Independent Study 

MATH 4901 1, 2, 3 cr. 

Directed Study 

MATH 4975 1-6 cr. 



▲ • 

Prerequisite: permission of the department 

▲ • 

Prerequisite: permission of the department. 



ilitary Science 



Fitchburg State College no longer offers Military Science courses. 
We continue to list the courses for students who were previously 
enrolled in the ROTC program and for students who are interested 
in taking the courses at Worcester Polytechnic Institute. 

Introduction to Army ROTC 

MILS 1400 1 cr. 1 hr. A 

The history, purpose, structure, and methods of the Army ROTC 
program are introduced in this course. The leadership and 
management responsibilities of an officer are presented Emphasis is 
placed on ROTC and its relationship with the United States Army. 

Introduction to the United States Army 

MILS 1500 1 cr. 1 hr. A 

This course provides an overview of the role of the 'Total Army" 
within the framework of the national defense establishment. The 
integrated roles of the Active Army and the Reserve Components 
are examined. Emphasis is placed on the duties and responsibilities of 
the officer serving in the combat arms, combat support, and combat 
service support branches. 



Land Navigation and Basic Tactics 

MILS 2000 2cr.2hr. A 

Students learn the basic fundamentals necessary to navigate. In Land 
Navigation, students identify terrain features, find locations, determine 
directions, and plan routes. Maps, protractors, compasses, terrain 
boards, and audio-visual aids are utilized extensively. The students also 
receive an introduction to individual tactical techniques and to small 
unit organization and utilization. Practical exercises are employed to 
give students hands-on experience in movement techniques and the 
tactical employment of small units. 

Emergency Medical Treatment/ Basic Tactics 

MILS 2200 2cr.2hr. A 

The first half of the course presents casualty evaluation, treatment, 
and evacuation under emergency conditions. Emphasis is on injury 
prevention under different climatic conditions and on the 
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) Technique. The second half of 
the course familiarizes the students with individual, buddy team, and 
squad tactics. These basic fundamentals are reinforced and built upon 
throughout the student's tenure in the Army ROTC program. 

Advanced Theory of Unit Operations 

MILS 3100 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course provides continuing study of effective leadership in 

tactical operations, culminating the lessons learned during previous 

courses. Students examine the theory and dynamics of the military 

team and its effective employment as part of the combined arms 

concept. 

Prerequisite: completion of Basic Course or advanced placement credit granted by 

the Professor of Military Science. 

Leadership 

MILS 3300 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course studies the psychology of leadership based on an 

organizational model. Emphasis is placed on individual, group, 

transactional, and organizational factors that both a leader and 

manager need to consider in order to be maximally effective. The 

student is provided with the essentials for forming a creative, 

personal management and leadership philosophy for practical 

application in a real world setting. 
Prerequisites: completion of Basic Course or advanced placement credit granted 

by the Professor of Military Science. 

Effective Communication 

MILS 4200 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course is designed to enhance the communication skills of the 

Army Officer. Emphasis is on the Army writing style, conducting 

briefings, and the Army Training Management System. Effective 

speaking, listening, writing, and military correspondence is studied, 

with an emphasis on the interrelationship of staff and command 

assignments, for the effective utilization of people and resources. 

Prerequisite: completion of Basic Course or advanced placement credit 
granted by the Professor of Military Science. 

Law, Ethics, and Preprofessiona! Seminar 

MILS 4300 3cr.3hr. A 

This course provides the student with an introduction to Military 
Law and Military Professional Ethics. The role of the junior officer 
with regard to military law in the practical setting of his/her initial 
assignment in an Army unit is examined. This course provides the 
Advanced Course cadet with a basic knowledge of the Army's 
organizational practices and philosophy. The role of the 
noncommissioned officer is reviewed along with the basics of line and 
staff functions. An overview of the Army's personnel management, 
training, and logistics systems, along with post and installation 
support organization and functions are presented as a Basic Course. 
Prerequisite: completion of Basic Course or advanced placement credit 
granted by the Professor of Military Science. 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Music 



Art of Music 

MUSC 1000 3 cr. 3 hr. ▲ • 

This course approaches the study of music as an aesthetic 
experience. Representative styles and categories from the Middle 
Ages to the present are explored. Students are required to attend 
professional concerts. L, C 

Beginning Musical Instruction 

MUSC 1300 1-3 cr. 3 hr. 

Private lessons at Indian Hill Music School are provided for the 
following instruments: baritone, clarinet, flute, horn, recorder, 
synthesizer, vibes, bass, double bass, guitar, oboe, saxophone, 
trombone, viola, bassoon, drums/percussion, harp, organ, Suzuki 
violin and cello, trumpet, violin, cello, harpsichord, piano, tuba, and 
voice. See Chair, Humanities Department. Fee required. L 

Introduction to Music Technology 

MUSC 1400 3 cr. 3 hr. 

Introduces students to the basic techniques and concepts of 
Electronic Music composition. Beginning with a brief review of the 
physics of sound and music, the class explores topics including the 
psycho-social roles of electronic music in art and pop culture, sound 
synthesis, MIDI, multi-media production, sampling technologies and 
music programming with C-sound. L 

World Music 

MUSC 1500 3 cr. 3 hr. 

This World Music course serves two primary purposes: 1 ) it teaches 
students about cultures around the world, and 2) it helps to 
understand the various intrinsic functions of Non-Western and 
Western music. By examining the music of peoples from various 
regions, this course addresses multicultural themes and the ubiquitous 
role of music in society. L, C 

Commonwealth of the Arts 

MUSC 2000 3 cr. 3 hr. ▲ • 

Music's reflection of the values and ideals of societies past and 
present are explored. Inter-relationships among the fine arts 
disciplines are examined. L, I, B, C, IDIS 

Commonwealth of Ancient Arts 

MUSC 2100 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

An interdisciplinary study of the humanities in ancient Western and 
non-Western cultures. A systematic overview of painting, sculpture, 
architecture, music, literature, drama, and philosophy in a historical 
context of significant cultures, including Paleolithic, Neolithic, 
Mesopotamian, Egyptian, Creek, Roman, Chinese, Indian, and 
American. Influences among these and other cultures will be 
presented. L, I, C, IDIS 

Basic Music Theory 

MUSC 2200 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course examines rhythmic notation, including meters and 
tempo. Emphasis is placed on melodic notation, including intervals, 
scales, and keys. Dynamics, an introduction to key relationship, 
transpositions, as well as other selected topics are covered. L 

Choral Arts 

MUSC 2300 1 cr. 2 hr. A 

The course involves singing choral music from the past and the 
present, including dramatic music. No more than six semester hours 
of any combination of MUSC 2300, 2400, 2500, 2600 are applicable 
toward graduation. L 

Intermediate Musical Instruction 

MUSC 2310 1-3 cr. 3 hr. 

Private lessons at Indian Hill Music School are provided for the 
following instruments: baritone, clarinet, flute, horn, recorder, 
synthesizer, vibes, bass, double bass, guitar, oboe, saxophone, 
trombone, viola, bassoon, drums/percussion, harp, organ, Suzuki 
violin and cello, trumpet, violin, cello, harpsichord, piano, tuba, and 
voice. See Chair, Humanities Department. Fee required. L 



Instrumental Arts 

MUSC 2400 1 cr. 2 hr. A 

Small and large ensembles play representative works. No more than 
six semester hours of any combination of MUSC 2300, 2400, 2500, 
2600 are applicable toward graduation. L 

Class Piano 

MUSC 2500 1 cr. 2hr. A • 

The class involves practical keyboard uses in classroom work, 
activities include accompaniment, simple transposition, and 
harmonization of melodies at the keyboard. No more than six 
semester hours of any combination of MUSC 2300, 2400, 2500, 
2600 are applicable toward graduation. L 

Class Voice 

MUSC 2600 lcr.2hr. A 

The principles of voice production are studied. Breath control, 
phrasing, resonance, and diction are stressed No more than six 
semester hours of any combination of MUSC 2300, 2400, 2500, 
2600 are applicable toward graduation. L 

Symphony 

MUSC 3100 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

Structural and stylistic characteristics of the symphony from the 
1 8th century to the present are studied. L 

Opera 

MUSC 3200 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

Students study several works from the standard operatic repertoire. 
Some significant trends in modern opera are discussed. L 

Advanced Musical Instruction 

MUSC 3300 1-3 cr. 3 hr. 

Private lessons at Indian Hill Music School are provided for the 
following instruments: baritone, clarinet, flute, horn, recorder, 
synthesizer, vibes, bass, double bass, guitar, oboe, saxophone, 
trombone, viola, bassoon, drums/percussion, harp, organ, Suzuki 
violin and cello, trumpet, violin, cello, harpsichord, piano, tuba, and 
voice. See Chair, Humanities Department. L 

Twentieth-Century Music 

MUSC 3400 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course examines the idioms and aesthetic notions of the present 
century, together with their relationship to the past. L, C 

Appreciating the American Musical 

MUSC 3450 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

Students will read a variety of literary texts and analyze how such 
texts were adopted as musicals, listen to the musicals and explore 
recurring themes. Particular attention is given to the historical 
development of the musical play in the 1940s and the dominance of 
the American book musical from the 1940s to the 1970s. L. IDIS 

American Music 

MUSC 3500 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course surveys American music from colonial times with some 
emphasis on "popular" and "Art" 
music of the present century in the 
U.S. L, C 



Baroque and Classical Music 

MUSC 3600 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The class examines various 
composers from Monteverdi to 
Beethoven. Topics covered in the 
course include opera, oratorio, 
passion, cantata, sonata forms, dance 
forms, and shifting aesthetic views. L 

19th Century Music 

MUSC 3700 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The class presents a survey of major 
forms of 19th century music from 
Beethoven to Mahler L 



Key to Course Offerings 

Q: designates courses in the 
Quantitative Scientific Cluster 

1: the Ideas and Events Ouster 

B: the Human Behavior Cluster 

L: the Literature, Language 
and Arts Cluster 

C: Multicultural 

IDIS: Interdisciplinary courses 

Multicultural and interdisciplinary courses also 

fuljiU a cluster designation. 

* Asterisk indicates that the course may 
be offered less than once every two years. 

▲ Undergraduate Day School 

• Undergraduate Evening School 

Courses having a more narrow focus than 
those taught on a regular basis or courses 
being taught on an experimental basis can 
be taught as Topics" courses. These courses 
will be assigned numbers based on the 
student level for which they are intended — 
first, second, third or fourth year. 



History of Jazz 

MUSC 3800 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course introduces students to the history of jazz and 
investigates the musical elements that make up jazz. The role of 
jazz in American history is explored, and various musical trends that 
contributed to jazz are traced. L, C 

Women, Music, and Society 

MUSC 3900 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course looks at the contributions of significant women in music. 
Compositions by women from different cultures are examined as a 
reflection of the social, political and economic conditions Elements 
of form, structure, and historical style are studied from antiquity to 
modern times in musical genres such as symphony, opera, chamber 
music, song, and solo repertoire L 

Harmony I 

MUSC 4500 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course involves the harmonization of simple melodies and 
studies principles of modulation and key relationships L 

Prerequisite: MUSC 2200. 

Harmony II 

*MUSC 4510 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course covers further work in modulation, including 

chromaticism and 19th and early 20th century developments. 

Prerequisite: MUSC 4500 or equivalent. L 

Independent Study in Music 

MUSC 4901-3 1-3 cr. 1-3 hr. A • 

The Independent Study is for selected students who have approval 
of both the department head and their advising Instructor. 

Internship in Music 

MUSC 4940 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

Directed Study 

MUSC 4975 1-6 cr. 



Nursing 



Health Assessment 

NURS 2300 3 cr. 5 hr. 

This course is designed to teach what Nightingale called "the habit of 
observation." It provides a foundation for assessment and nursing 
diagnosis, integrating physical assessment skills, the nursing process, 
interviewing techniques, health history taking, diagnostic study 
interpretations, environmental evaluation, and concepts of growth 
and development. Clinical component is to practice health assessment 
techniques 

Prerequisites: ENGL 1100 and 1200, PSY 1100, SOC 1100, BIO 1200 and 

1300, CHEM 1100 and 1200. 

Pathopharmacology I 

NURS 2500 3 cr. 3 hr. 

This is the first course of a two-course sequence, which integrates 

basic concepts from pathophysiology and pharmacology. The 

content focuses on alterations in physiology that produce clinical 

responses in the body. Theories of stress, adaptation and systems 

provide the basic for understanding how the body adjusts or fails to 

adjust to disease processes. 

Prerequisites: ENGL 1100 and 1200, PSY 1100, SOC 1100, BIO 1200 and 

1300, CHEM 1100 and 1200. 

Pathopharmacology II 

NURS 2600 3 cr. 3 hr. 

This is the second course of a two-course sequence, which integrates 

basic concepts from pathophysiology and pharmacology. The 

content focuses on alterations in physiology that produce clinical 

responses in the body. Theories of stress, adaptation and systems 

provide the basis for understanding how the body adjusts or fails to 

adjust to disease processes. 

Prerequisites: NURS 2500. 



Foundations 

NURS 2700 5 cr. 9 hr. A 

This course is designed to be the foundation for nursing knowledge 
and clinical laboratory experiences. Content emphasis is placed on 
professionalism, caring, communication, cultural considerations, 
spirituality, sexuality and health promoting activities. Students will 
complete on-campus laboratory experiences focusing on basic skills. 
Prerequisites: ENGL 1200, PSY 1100, SOC 1100, BIOL 1200 
and 1300, CHEM 1100 and 1200. 
Pre or corerequisites: NURS 2500 and PSY 2200.. 

Medical-Surgical Nursing I 

NURS 2900 5cr.9hr. 

This course teaches core concepts in the nursing care of adults with 
common health alterations. The development of critical thinking 
skills is emphasized. Nursing care is presented using a nursing process 
framework Clinical experience occurs in sub-acute care agencies. 
Prerequisites: NURS 2500 NURS 2700 and PSY 2200. Pre or corerequisites: 

NURS 2300 and 2600 

Nursing Care of the Child Bearing Family 

NURS 2910 5 cr. 9 hr. A 

This course for Registered Nurse students examines current 
concepts and nursing interventions for the care of prenatal, 
intrapartal, and postpartal women and neonates. (RN students may 
exempt by exam). 

Prerequisites: ENGL 1200, BIOL 1200 and 1300, BIOL 2700, PSY 2200, SOC 

1100. 

Core Concepts of Mental Health Nursing 

NURS 3200 5cr.9hr. 

This course teaches psychiatric and mental health nursing concepts 
for individuals experiencing health alterations. Course work will teach 
the student to identify contemporary and historical explanations and 
the etiology and treatment of individuals experiencing psychiatric and 
mental health disorders. Students will analyze the influence of culture, 
society, values, beliefs, perceptions, and environment on the 
behaviors exhibited by individuals, families, groups, and providers 
with psychiatric and mental health issues. Clinical experience occurs 
in acute and/or community care agencies. 

Prerequisites: NURS 2300, 2600, and 2900, BIOI 1650 and 2700. 

Maternal-Newborn Nursing 

NURS 3300 5 cr. 9 hr. 

This course teaches the theoretical foundation and clinical experience 
to care for the childbearing family. Health promotion of the 
developing family is emphasized in both community and hospital 
settings. Care of the high risk mother and neonate are included. 
Concepts of family theory and dynamics are expanded. Clinical 
experience occurs in acute and/or chronic care agencies. 

Prerequisites: NURS 2300, 2600, and 2900, BIOI 1650 and 2700. 

Medical-Surgical Nursing II 

NURS 3400 5cr.9hr. 

This course teaches the nursing care of adults with acute medical and 

surgical conditions. Holistic care of clients with respect for diversity 

is stressed The nursing process is used as a framework to guide 

content. Clinical experience occurs in acute care agencies. 

Prerequisites: NURS 2300, 2600, and 2900, BIOI 1650 and 2700. 

Concepts of Nursing I 

NURS 3500 3 cr. 5 hr. A 

This is one of two courses designed to provide advance placement 

for the registered nurse student that can be taken either semester or 

concurrently with Nursing Concepts II. The evolution and 

development of theoretical models of nursing as well as other 

historical precedents are investigated. The focus of the clinical 

component is utilization of the functional health pattern format to 

assess the health status of clients and the development of a nursing 

history 

Prerequisite: CHEM 1100, CHEM 1200, ENGL 1200, BIOL 1300, BIOL 2700, 
PSY 1100, PSY 2200, SOC 1100, pre or co-requisite ACE II Exams or 

equivalent. 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Concepts of Nursing II 

NURS 3600 3 cr. 5 hr. A 

This is one of two courses designed to provide advance placement 
for the registered nurse student that can be taken either semester or 
concurrently with Nursing Concepts I. Selected nursing diagnoses 
within the format of functional health patterns are addressed. 
Students are provided the opportunity to explore the 
interdependence of the multiple elements of the nursing process 

applied to selected case studies. 

Prerequisite: CHEM 1100, CHEM 1200, ENGL 1200, BIOL 1300, BIOL 2700, 
PSY 1100, PSY 2200, SOC 1100, pre or co-requisite NACE II Exams or 

equivalent. 

Topics: Portfolio Preparation 

NURS 3650 2cr.2hr. 

Introduces Registered Nurse students to the concept of portfolio 
preparation for advanced placement. Assists students in development 

of professional portfolio. 
Prerequisites: CHEM 1100, 1200, ENGL 1200, BIOL 1200 and 1300, BIOL 
2700, PSY 1100, PSY 2200, SOC 1100, pre or co-requisite ACE II exams or 

Pediatric Nursing 

NURS 3900 5cr.9hr. 

This course teaches a theoretical base and clinical experience in 

caring for infants, children, and adolescents. The focus is the major 

and most common disorders of infants, children, and adolescents. 

The nursing process is the basis for providing care in a variety of 

settings. Health promotion aspects of preventing or alleviating health 

problems are addressed Clinical experience occurs in acute care 

agencies. 

Prerequisites: NURS 2300, 2500, 2600, and 2900, BIOI 1650 and 2700. 

Nursing Care of the Mentally III Client 

NURS 3910 Scr.Shr. A 

This course for Registered Nurse students examines current 

concepts and nursing measures in the care of clients with selected 

alterations in mental health. (RN students may exempt by exam). 
Prerequisites: CHEM 1100, CHEM 1200, ENGL 1200, BIOL 1200 and 1300, 

BIOL 2700, PSY 2200, SOC 1100. 

Nursing Care of the Child 

NURS 3920 5cr.5hr. A 

This course for Registered Nurse students examines current 
concepts and nursing measures in the care of children from infancy 
through adolescence. (RN students may exempt by exam). 

Prerequisites: CHEM 1100, CHEM 1200, ENGL 1200, BIOL 1200 and 1300, 

BIOL 2700, PSY 2200, SOC 1100. 

Nursing Care of the Adult 

NURS 3930 10 cr. 10 hr. A 

This course for Registered Nurse students examines current 
concepts and nursing measures in the care of adult clients with 
selected common health problems. (RN students may exempt by 
exam). 

Prerequisites: CHEM 1100, CHEM 1200, ENGL 1200, BIOL 1200 and 1300, 

BIOL 2700, PSY 2200, SOC 1100. 

Nursing Research 

NURS 4000 2cr.2hr. A 

This course prepares students as knowledgeable research consumers. 
Nursing students identify and explore research problems in nursing 
practice. 

Prerequisites: MATH 1700. 
Pre or corerequisite: NURS 3600 or NURS 3200 3300, 3400 and 3900. 

Community Health Nursing 

NURS 4400 5 cr. 9 hr. 

This course teaches systems' concepts as a basis for applying the 
nursing process with aggregate clients in the community. Special 
emphasis is placed on nursing care of vulnerable populations 
including: the homeless, people of poverty, minority populations, 
women and children, and older adults. Primary, secondary, and 
tertiary prevention are sued when applying the nursing process in a 
variety of distributive care settings. Clinical experience occurs in 
community agencies. 

Prerequisites: NURS 3600 or NURS 3200 3300, 3400 and 3900. 



Chronic Illness 

NURS 4750 4 cr. 8 hr. A 

This course teaches the application of nursing process with 
individuals and families in the home health care setting. Emphasis is 
placed on primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention. 

Prerequisites: NURS 3600 or NURS 3200 3300, 3400 and 3900. 

Selected Nursing Practicum 

NURS 4800 10 cr. 26 hr. A 

This capstone course offers opportunities for in-depth exploration 
of an area of nursing interest. Nursing process with clients 
experiencing complex health problems, leadership and management 
principles, and professional issues are integrated into clinical 
practice. A preceptor model is used to facilitate increased 
independence in professional practice. 

Prerequisites: NURS 4000, NURS 4400, and 4750. 
Co-requisite: NURS 4850. 

Leadership and Management Concepts for Nursing 
Practice 

NURS 4850 2cr.2hr. A 

This course teaches concepts underlying professional career 

development in nursing. The roles of the nurse as manager of client 

care, as part of a health care institution hierarchy, and as a member 

of a professional collective are explored. 

Prerequisites: NURS 4000, NURS 4400 and NURS 4750. 

Independent Study 

NURS 4901 1 cr. 1 hr. A 

Independent Study 

NURS 4902 2cr.3hr. A 

Independent Study 

NURS 4903 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

Directed Study 

NURS 4975 16 cr. 



Occupational/Vocational 
Education 

These courses are only offered through 
Continuing Education. 

Seminar for the Beginning Vocational Technical 
Education Teacher 

OCED 2500 3 cr. 

Designed to prepare new vocational technical teachers for her/his 

first teaching assignment, the characteristics of an effective teacher as 

well as the tools required by first year teachers to be successful will be 

explored. These include techniques for establishing effective 

classroom routines, student instruction and assessment, and 

maintaining a positive classroom/ 

shop/laboratory climate that conveys 

high expectations. Students also will 

learn to identify the elements of a 

course/program curriculum, as well as 

how to develop a lesson plan, assign 

and grade homework and collaborate 

with colleagues to improve 

instruction, assessment and student 

achievement. 



Key to Course Offerings 

Q: designates courses in the 
Quantitative Scientific Cluster 

1: the Ideas and Events Ouster 

B: the Human Behavior Cluster 

L the Literature, Language 
and Arts Cluster 

C: Multicultural 

IDIS: Interdisciplinary courses 

Multicultural and mterdisciplinary counts also 

juljill a cluster designation. 

* Asterisk indicates that the course may 
be offered less than once every two years. 

▲ Undergraduate Day School 

• Undergraduate Evening School 

Courses having a more narrow focus than 
those taught on a regular basis or courses 
being taught on an experimental basis can 
be taught as Topics" courses. These courses 
will be assigned numbers based on the 
student level for which they are intended — 
first, second, third or fourth year 



Teaching Methods: Instructional Strategies in 
Vocational Technical Education 

OCED 2515 3 cr. • 

Theories and techniques of instruction are examined. Topics 
covered include proficiency in the application of learning theories, 
strategies, techniques and the methodology involved in the delivery 
of specific courses of study. Additional themes include the 
competency-based vocational technical lessons, lesson plan design, 
developing behavioral standards, classroom management and the 
coordination and evaluation of student learning. 
Note: This is a required course for candidates seeking Massachusetts 
Department of Education approval as a Vocational Technical 
Instructor. 

Teaching Methods: Educating the 
Vocational Technical Learner 

OCED 2516 3 cr. • 

This course refines the teaching/learning skills introduced in OCED 
2515. Micro teaching and video tape replay review strengthen and 
foster effective teaching in the secondary vocational technical 
classroom. The requirements of chapter 74 (as amended by chapter 
731) as they impact upon the laboratory/classroom setting are 
explored. Other topics covered include student disciplinary and 
safety concerns and the identification and utilization of curriculum 
resources. 

Note: This is a required course for candidates seeking Massachusetts 
Department of Education approval as a Vocational Technical 
Instructor. 

Management of the Vocational 
Technical Education Environment 

OCED 2518 3 cr. • 

This course examines laboratory, academic, and related classroom 
and cooperative placement site safety. Emphasis on developmental 
psychology, adolescent psychology, learning styles, and discipline 
strategies addresses the needs of adolescents, students with special 
needs, disadvantaged youth, nontraditional students, linguistic 
minorities, and other priority populations Also studied are student 
organizations, record keeping and data coordination, advisory 
committees, and communication networking. 
Note: This is a required course for candidates seeking Massachusetts 
Department of Education approval as a Vocational Technical 
Instructor. 

Managing Student Behavior in a Healthy & Safe 
Environment 

OCED 2520 3 cr. 

All aspects of student record keeping regarding task performance, 
evaluation of job performance, classroom/shop management 
techniques, health and safety issues pertaining to vocational 
programs, curriculum development and implementation that 
addresses a wide range of learning styles, and Vocational/Technical 
Chapter 74 Program guidelines are emphasized. 

Students with Special Needs in 
Vocational Technical Education 

OCED 2523 3 cr. • 

This course traces the development of Special Needs Programs with 
emphasis on the identification and understanding of special needs 
students in vocational schools. Particular attention is given to 
teaching techniques and administrative organization patterns utilized 
in a vocational school. 

Note: This is a required course for candidates seeking either 
Massachusetts Department of Education approval as a Vocational 
Technical Instructor or Special Ed/Voc Ed Mini-approval. 



Competency Based Vocational Technical 
Curriculum Development 

OCED 2529 3 cr. • 

This course is designed to enable teachers to identify competencies 

within their respective vocational technical program areas. It further 

discusses techniques to enable teachers to develop, evaluate, and 

verify competencies. 

Note: This is a required course for candidates seeking Massachusetts 

Department of Education approval as a Vocational Technical 

Instructor. 

Teaching Methods for Vocational Technical Education - 
Instructional Strategies 

OCED 2530 3 cr. 

Intended for the undergraduate student pursuing teacher certification 
in Occupational Education. Students will be introduced to the latest, 
accepted methods of teaching and how to employ them effectively in 
the vocational instructional environment. Students will develop skills 
necessary to teach Vocational High School students in the class/ 
laboratory setting. 

Brain Compatibility: Teaching and Learning 

OCED 2547 3 cr. • 

Researchers have learned more about the brain and learning in the 
last decade than in previous recorded history. This course is designed 
to provide educators with a review of brain research relevant to 
learning styles on any grade level and to allow teachers to apply 
specific brain compatible methods in their classroom and laboratory 
situations. This area of study is critical to the task of serving students 
properly. Proficiency in applying brain research to the planning and 
delivery of instruction is gained through this course. 
Note: This is a required course for candidates seeking Massachusetts 
Department of Education approval as a Vocational Technical 
Instructor. 

Teaching Methods for Vocational Technical Education - 

Educating & 

Assessing the Vocational Technical Education Learner 

OCED 3510 3 cr. 

Emphasis will be given on how to deliver effective instruction by 
means of a variety of methodologies to reach each student. 
Participants in the course will deal with current legislation including 
No Child Left Behind, NCLB, and the state mandated standardized test, 
Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System, MCAS. They 
will examine the importance of developing essential learning goals in 
relation to effective assessment and review the theory of multiple 
intelligences and the necessity of creating assessment tools that 
measure students' growth using a variety of methods. 

Fundamentals of Vocational Technical Education 

OCED 3517 3 cr. • 

This course examines the history and philosophy of vocational 
technical education. The present state of Federal vocational 
education, Chapter 731 , Child Labor Laws, Chapter 622 and Title IX, 
and Chapter 766, State Vocational Council is covered Additionally 
the course studies The National Center for Research in Vocational 
Education, and Federal Vocational Education Regulations. 

Teaching Methods for Vocational Technical Education - 
Using Research-Based Practices to Develop Effective 
instructional Strategies 

OCED 3520 3 cr. 

Recent findings in brain research have led to improved strategies in 
teaching students with varying learning styles. A review of the 
research and development strategies will improve and strengthen 
teaching skills. Required for certification for technical teachers. 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Promoting Positive Social Behavior for Students with 
Special Needs in Vocational Education 

OCED 3524 3 cr. • 

The course provides familiarity with the continuum of services 
required for students with special needs in all school settings. The 
modifications of approach and teaching techniques which make 
vocational education accessible to all students are discussed in depth. 
A Case Study is required of each student in the course. 

Strategies and Methods for Teaching Special Needs 
Students Re: Vocational Education 

OCED 3525 3 cr. 

A practical approach to planning instruction for special needs 
students in the regular class within a vocational school setting. Using 
a framework for applying theory in practice, teachers develop and/or 
attempt strategies that are applicable to their classrooms. 

Implementation and Evaluation of Education Plans for 
Students with Special Needs 

OCED 3526 3 cr. • 

The course provides experience in interpreting educational 
prescriptions for implementation within vocational training programs. 
Each student designs an individualized instructional plan describing 
all materials, recommended methodology and techniques of 
evaluation. 

Seminar and Practicum in 

Vocational Education/Special Education 

OCED 3527 3cr. • 

Students complete a practicum or internship in an approved setting 
for individuals with special needs. Students are assisted in 
implementing the various facets of their role within a given setting. 
Visitations are planned not only to observe the competencies being 
demonstrated but to meet with school administrators in defining the 
role and functions. Practicum seminar is designed to assist the total 
group in dealing with current concerns and issues and to allow 
students to learn from the experiences of each other. 

Developing & Implementing a Standards-Based 
Curriculum in Vocational Technical Education 

OCED 3530 3cr. 

Upon completion of this course students will be able to conduct 
occupational research, develop program tasks, analyze tasks and 
design performance assessments. Using these skills students will be 
able to develop a standards-based curriculum or improve upon an 
existing curriculum. A required course to obtain vocational teacher 
licensure as required by Chapter 74 regulations. 

Implementing a Competency Based Curriculum 

OCED 3539 3 cr. • 

This course is designed to provide teachers the tools needed to 
successfully implement a competency based program. Teachers 
demonstrate competency in revising learning guides and task listings. 
A management system to evaluate student achievement and maintain 
competency profiles is examined. Teachers are introduced to the 
principles of integrated and applied learning to assist them in bridging 
the vocational and academic competencies required by their students. 
Activities culminate in the production of a revised/adapted curriculum 
for a specific vocational technical program area. 
Note: This is a required course for candidates seeking Massachusetts 
Department of Education approval as a Vocational Technical 
Instructor. 

Computerized Vocational Technical Curriculum Management 

OCED 3545 3 cr. • 

This course is designed to introduce the vocational technical 
educator to the microcomputer as a tool for curriculum, classroom 
record keeping, and planning. Students adapt, modify, and 
incorporate the excellent curricular resources developed within 
Massachusetts, including CBVE, MSCP, and others into practical 
learning applications utilizing the computer. In addition to hands-on 
experience with a microcomputer, the course enables participants to 



blend classroom and laboratory learning with an emphasis on 
integrated software and its application within a vocational technical 
setting. 

Integrated Vocational Technical and Academic 
Curriculum 

OCED 3546 3 cr. • 

This course shares, explores, and investigates Massachusetts 
developed curricular resources, including CBVE, MSCP, Model 
Academic Project, LAPS, as well as nationally devised curriculum, 
including Principles of Technology, CBE, and others. This learning 
activity examines the eight methods (academic infusing, cross 
articulation, vocational/technical relevance, content alignment, the 
academy model, specialized courses/programs, employability/career 
path skills and the culminating/senior project) for integration 
identified by the National Center for Research in Vocational 
Education at the University of California at Berkeley. 

Assessment Standards and Evaluation 

OCED 3549 3 cr. • 

Participants explore strategies for establishing student performance 
criteria, assessing student knowledge and attitudes, evaluating hands- 
on skills and determining student grades. Topics include identifying 
and examining existing standards and social equity in educational 
assessment. Methods for linking competency designed instructional 
objectives to evaluation and measuring instruments are reviewed, 
including factors related to reliability and range. 

Addressing the Needs of Students with Disabilities in 
Vocational Technical Education 

OCED 3700 3 cr. 

Particular attention will be given to a general review of state and 
federal 

regulations pertinent to the vocational special needs population. 
Students will be introduced to the various categories of 
exceptionality, including the characteristics, definitions, prevalence, 
etiology, educational approaches and strategies. New trends in 
vocational technical education will be discussed as well as needed 
changes under educational reform to meet the ever present demands 
such as MCAS. 



Key to Course Offerings 

Q: designates courses in the 
Quantitative Scientific Cluster 

I: the Ideas and Events Ouster 

B: the Human Behavior Cluster 

L: the Literature, Language 
and Arts Ouster 

G Multicultural 

IDIS: Interdisciplinary courses 

Multicultural and interdisciplinary courses also 

fulfill a cluster designation. 

* Asterisk indicates that the course may 
be offered less than once every two years. 

▲ Undergraduate Day School 

• Undergraduate Evening School 

Courses having a more narrow focus than 
those taught on a regular basis or coupes 
being taught on an experimental basis can 
be taught as Topics" courses These courses 
will be assigned numbers based on the 
student level for which they are intended — 
first, second, third or fourth year. 



Supervised Practicum in Vocational Education 

OCED 4534 3 cr. • 

A practicum is a modified teaching placement in a vocational 
technical school or equivalent field-based experience. Candidates 
function as "pre-approved" instructors with responsibility for 
demonstrating ability to implement various teaching models, 
familiarization with school policies, classroom management 
techniques, and the coordination of educable training resources. 
Teaching is supervised by a cooperating teacher and monitored and 
evaluated by a college instructor. Practicum participants design 
competency-based lesson plans, participate actively in seminar 
discussions, and complete a research assignment on educational 
reform. Eligible practicum time requirements: 5 hours/day x 3-4 
days x 6 weeks. 

Advanced Computerized Vocational Technical 
Curriculum Management 

OCED 4595 3 cr. • 

This course provides an orientation and application of Lotus 1-2-3 
for the vocational technical setting. This software is a recognized 
leader in the microcomputer spreadsheets market with its ease of 
use, size, and power. Students learn through hands-on experience 
how to plan, design, implement and perform analysis utilizing a 
microcomputer and Lotus 1-2-3. Additionally, a historical view of 
spreadsheets and their impact on the manner in which effective 
organizations operate in the planning, creating, saving, and printing 
of data is emphasized. Participants interpret data using database 
functions and by creating and printing graphs. 
Note: This course may be used as a computer science cluster 
requirement. 



Philosophy 



Peace Studies 



Introduction to Peace Studies 

IDIS 1900 3 cr. 3 hr. 

In this introduction, the field of Peace Studies, an inter-disciplinary 
approach, the students will explore conflict — its origins, management, 
ramifications, and attempts to move beyond it. Conflict will be 
explored on the individual, group, national, and international levels. I, 
IDIS 

Dilemmas of Peace and War 

IDIS 2100 3 cr. 3hr. A • 

I, L, C, IDIS 

"Origins of Conflict" Electives 

Intro to International Studies 

Global Issues 

Economic Development 

Race and Ethnic Relations 

Sociology oj Developing Societies 

Social Stratification 

International Relations 

Third World Politics, Economics and Society 

Psychology oj Women 

Psychology oj Captivity 

"Vision of Peace" Electives 

PHIL 3610 World Religions 
PSY 2 3 70 Interpersonal Ejjectiveness 
PSY 2550 Group Dynamics 
PSY 2570 Small Group Leadership 
SOC 2250 Cultural Anthropology 



IDIS 


1200 


IDIS 


1800 


ECON 


2 500 


SOC 


2 500 


SOC 


2 600 


SOC 


3000 


POLS 


2200 


POLS 


3 800 


PSY 


2250 


PSY 


2400 



Introduction to Western Philosophy 

PHIL 1000 3 cr. 3hr. A • 

The course serves as an introduction to the problems, methods, and 
goals of classical and contemporary Western Philosophy. Emphasis is 
placed upon how these differ from and relate to other fields of human 
knowledge. I 

Logic 

PHIL 1100 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

The course introduces techniques for analyzing the structure and 
validity of arguments in a natural language, such as English, as well as 
the concepts and principles of validity. Emphasis is on truth- 
functional and quantification inference, and a procedure in formal 
systems. L, Q, IDIS. 

Philosophy of Education 

PHIL 2000 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

This course seeks to trace the origin and development of major 
educational theories and their contemporary implications. I 

Theories of Knowledge 

*PHIL 2200 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The problems and methods of human knowledge are explored. 
Theories are presented in the light of idealism, realism, pragmatism, 
and existentialism. I 

Prerequisite: PHIL 1000 or 1100. 

American Philosophy 

*PHIL 2440 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course presents a study of American thought from the Colonial 
Period to the present. I 

Contemporary Ethical Problems 

PHIL 2500 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

The nature of values and morality Application of ethical theory to 
such controversial moral issues as criminal punishment and the death 
penalty, abortion, euthanasia and suicide, the ethical treatment of 
animals, poverty and the distribution of wealth, prejudice and 
discrimination, affirmative action, civil disobedience, and war. I 

Contemporary Ethical Systems 

PHIL 2550 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

A critical examination of the major ethical theories in classical and 
contemporary philosophy including Aristotle's perfectionism, 
Aquinas' natural law ethics, Kant's deontological ethics, Bentham and 
Mill's utilitarianism, existentialism, emotivism, and personalism. 
Topics covered include values and facts, morality and ethics, 
objectivism, subjectivism, and relativism,- ethics and science, and 
ethics and religion. I 

Philosophy of Human Nature 

PHIL 2600 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

The course provides an exploration of human nature or personhood 
from the triple perspectives of philosophy, religion, and behavioral 
science. The class focuses on the following thinkers and movements: 
Plato, Christianity, early modern individualism, Marxism, Freud, 
existentialism, Frankl's logotherapy, Skinner, Fromm's humanism and 
personalism. I, B, IDIS. 

Ancient and Medieval Philosophy 

PHIL 3310 3cr.3hr. A 

The course studies the beginnings of Western Philosophy, including 

the pre-Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, and several other thinkers of the 

period. I 

Prerequisite: PHIL 1000 or PHIL 2600. 

Renaissance and Modem Philosophy 

*PHIL 3330 3cr.3hr. A 

The course explores trends of thought from fourteenth century 

nominalism through the Renaissance to Continental Rationalism and 

British Empiricism 1 

Prerequisite: PHIL 1000 or PHIL 2600. 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Contemporary Philosophy 

PHIL 3340 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course provides an examination of some current trends and 
issues in contemporary American, British, and European philosophy. 

I, IDIS 

Prerequisite: PHIL 1000 or PHIL 2600. 

Philosophy of Religion 

'PHIL 3600 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

The nature of religious experience and the problem of Cod's 

existence as seen in classical Western theism and process philosophy 

Differences between Western and Eastern religion, and between 

religion and science. I 

Prerequisite: PHIL 1000 or PHIL 2600. 

World Religions 

PHIL 3610 3cr.3hr. A 

This course studies the principal world religions, including 
Buddhism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, and Judaism. Emphasis is 
placed on their basic tenets and insights into spiritual values. I, C 

Philosophy of Art 

*PHIL 4100 3cr.3hr. A 

The nature of beauty and aesthetic experience, especially as 
embodied in the arts. Relation of aesthetic experience to moral and 
technological experience. Survey and critical evaluation of different 
theories of aesthetics in Western philosophy. Synthesis of subjective 
and objective theories. I 

Political and Social Philosophy 

PHIL 4200 3cr.3hr. A 

The course examines the various political and social ideas beginning 
with Plato and continuing to Marx. I 

Prerequisite: PHIL 1000 or PHIL 2600 or POLS 1000 or POLS 1100. 

Philosophy of Science 

*PHIL 4300 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course analyzes the methods and goals of the physical sciences, 
how they differ from the social sciences, and the philosophic 
problems encountered in scientific pursuits. I 

Philosophy of Language 

*PHIL 4400 3cr.3hr. A 

This course is the study of theories about structure and 
meaningfulness of language, especially in twentieth century Anglo- 
American thought. I 

Prerequisite: PHIL 1000 or 1100. 

Marxism 

*PHIL 4430 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

Origins, development, and contemporary application of Marx's 
thought are explored. The course attempts to provide an 
understanding of society and history by a philosophy identified with 
political economy I, IDIS. 

Prerequisite: PHIL 1000 or PHIL 2600. 

Philosophy of Love 

PHIL 4500 3 cr. 3 hr. • 

The course analyzes the concept "love" as employed in the social 
and moral philosophies of various classical and contemporary 
thinkers. I 

Ethical Issues in Business 

PHIL 4700 3cr. A • 

The first objective of the course is to develop proficiency in the 
identification and analysis of ethical issues as they arise in business. 
The second objective is to acquaint the student with some specific 
ethical problems currently faced by business men and women: 
whistle-blowing, discrimination, truth in advertising, product safety 
and the environment. Both theoretical and actual cases are studied as 
well as two current ethical theories. 1 

Independent Study 

PHIL 4903 3cr.3hr. ▲• 

The Independent Study is open to students who have permission of 
the supervising instructor and the Department chairperson. Course of 
study, meetings, and credit are arranged with approval. 



Physics 



Physical Science I 

PHYS 1100 3 cr. 4hr. A • 

This course is designed to help non-science students in developing a 
meaningful and functional understanding of key physical science 
concepts and methodology. Topics include light, color, and 
electricity The course is taught with a combination of lectures, group 
discussions, and learning-by-doing activities. The emphasis is to 
provide students with open-ended problem solving environments that 
facilitate insight into the nature of science as an intellectual activity, 
and to encourage students to explore alternate conceptions of 
physical phenomena. Q 

Physical Science II 

PHYS 1200 3 cr. 4hr. A • 

This course is designed to help non-science students in developing a 
meaningful and functional understanding of key physical science 
concepts and methodology. Topics include motion, force, heat, 
energy, and nature of matter. The course is taught with a combination 
of lectures, group discussions, and learning-by-doing activities. The 
emphasis is to provide students with open-ended problem solving 
environments that facilitate insight into the nature of science as an 
intellectual activity, and to encourage students to explore alternate 
conceptions of physical phenomena. Q 

Environmental Physical Science 

*PHYS 1250 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

The course studies the environment, the effects of pollution on the 

environment, ecosystems, and natural balance. Relevant background 

material in physical science is taught as needed. 

Prerequisites: PHYS 1100, GEOG 1300, or equivalent 

General Physics I 

PHYS 2300 4cr.5hr. A9 

This first-semester general college physics course consists of studies 
in the principle and application of classical mechanics, waves, sound, 
and heat. Typical topics include description of motions, Newton's 
laws of motion, Kepler's law of planetary motion, universal 
gravitation, work and energy, conservation laws, temperature, heat, 
and laws of thermodynamics. Q 

Prerequisite: MATH 1300 or equivalent 

General Physics II 

PHYS 2400 4cr.5hr. ▲• 

This second-semester general college physics course consists of 

studies and applications of wave motions, sound, electricity, 

magnetism, light and optics. Typical topics include Coulomb's law, 

electric force and field, potential and capacitance, electric circuits, 

magnetic force and field, magnetic forces on moving charges, electric 

induction, laws of reflection and refraction, mirrors and lenses, optical 

instruments, interference and diffraction of light. Q 
Prerequisite: MATH 1300 or equivalent 



Physics for the Life Sciences 

*PHYS 1500 4cr.6hr. A 

The class serves as an introduction to 
Physics. Class work includes a brief 
treatment of force, work, and energy 
with an emphasis on the nature of 
waves, optics, and electricity. 



Key to Course Offerings 

Q: designates courses in the 
Quantitative Scientific Cluster 

I: the Ideas and Events Cluster 

B: the Human Behavior Cluster 

L: the Literature, Language 
and Arts Ouster 

C Multicultural 

IDIS: Interdisciplinary courses 

Multicultural and interdisciplinary counts also 

juljill a cluster designation. 

* Asterisk indicates that the course may 
be offered less than once every two years. 

▲ Undergraduate Day School 

• Undergraduate Evening School 

Courses having a more narrow focus than 
those taught on a regular basis or courses 
being taught on an experimental basis can 
be taught as Topics" courses These courses 
will be assigned numbers based on the 
student level for which they are intended — 
first, second, third or fourth year. 



Astronomy 

PHYS 2000 3 cr. 3 hr. ▲ • 

Emphasis of this course is on the properties of stars. The course 
begins with a description of the internal structure of the earth, its 
atmosphere, its motions, etc. Moon, its structure and surface 
features are studied next. After a brief discussion of optical and 
radio telescopes, the students are introduced to a rudimentary 
account of physics of stars such as their surface temperatures, 
distances, their velocities, etc. Sun is studied as a typical star. Binaries 
and variable stars (cepheids, novae and supernovae, etc.) interstellar 
medium and finally galaxies round off the course. Q 

General Physics III 

* PHYS 3000 3cr.3hr. A 

This third-semester of general college physics course discusses the 

inadequacy of classical physics and introduces the theories and 

models of modern physics. Topics covered in class work include the 

development of quantum theory as depicted in blackbody radiation, 

photoelectric effect, and x-rays, the wave function and the 

uncertainty principle, atomic spectra, Bohr's model of hydrogen, 

electronic configuration of atoms, the exclusion principle and the 

periodic table, properties of nuclei, binding energy, radioactivity and 

the decay processes, radiation hazards, and nuclear reactions. Q 

Prerequisites: PHYS 2300 and PHYS 2400. 

Intermediate Mechanics 

* PHYS 3300 3cr.3hr. A 

Calculus and delta methods are used in an analytical study of 
Newtonian mechanics with emphasis on application to 
nonconservative forces, central forces, and rotational dynamics. 
Topics covered in class work are linear oscillator, free and forced 
oscillations, damping, vibrating string, traveling and standing waves. 

Prerequisite: PHYS 2400 or equivalent 

Quantum Mechanics 

*PHYS 3100 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course examines the inadequacies of classical physics, including 
the uncertainty principle, Schrodinger equation, physical 
interpretation of wave function, energy levels, harmonic oscillator, 
hydrogen atom, and perturbation theory. 

Prerequisites: PHYS 3000 and MATH 2400. 

Electricity and Magnetism 

*PHYS 3200 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

After a preliminary introduction to vector algebra, electrostatic and 
magnetostatic fields in vacuum and material media are discussed. 
Maxwell's equations and propagation of electromagnetic waves are 
considered. 

Statistical Mechanics and Thermodynamics 

*PHYS 4100 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course examines the laws of thermodynamics, entropy, Carnot 

cycle, kinetic theory of gases, Bose and Fermi gases, and low 

temperature physics. 

Prerequisite: PHYS 3100. 

Solid State Physics 

*PHYS 4200 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course provides a short review of quantum mechanics, including 

crystal structure magnetism semiconductor theory and specific heat of 

solids. 

Prerequisite: PHYS 4100. 

Independent Study 

PHYS 4900 3cr. A 

The Independent Study is open to students who have permission of 
the supervising instructor and the department. The course of study, 
meetings, and credit are arranged upon approval. 

Directed Study 

PHYS 4975 1-6 cr. 



Plastics Technology 



These courses are only offered through 
Continuing Education. 

Blueprint Reading 

PLAS 1010 3cr. • 

This course introduces the basic concepts of blueprint reading and 
discusses types of lines, angles, and views of a drawing. The student 
also learns about dimensioning circles, arcs, holes, and threads. 
Emphasis is on understanding how to interpret a blueprint, with time 
permitting, students learn how to draw a blueprint. 

Industrial Electrical Maintenance 

PLAS 1030 • 

This course covers the concepts of electrical trouble-shooting of 
injection molding machines and associated equipment. Familiarization 
with basic electricity symbols, blueprint reading, meters used for 
trouble-shooting, conventional and solid ladder diagrams/schematics, 
and trouble-shooting is stressed. Programmable Logic Controls (PLC) 
are examined. 

Moid Design 

PLAS 2020 3cr. • 

This course examines the interrelation of plastics material 
processing, product design and function, and mold design and 
construction. Fundamental principles of cavity design, material feed 
systems, ejection systems, parting surfaces, mold actions, cavity and 
core steel selections, 3-plate, insulated runner, and hot runner molds 
are discussed. 

Prerequisite: PLAS 1010. 

Hydraulics/Pneumatics 

PLAS 2040 3cr. • 

This course involves a theoretical and practical study of hydraulics 
and pneumatics, the modern means of power transmission. This 
course surveys component design and function with an emphasis on 
problem definitions and solutions. Following an introduction to 
hydraulics and pneumatics, a study is made of valves, pumps, 
circuits, and trouble-shooting any hydraulic system. 

Injection Molding 

PLAS 2050 3cr. • 

The reciprocating screw injection molding machine, the components 
of injection molding machines, the molding cycle, melting and flow 
theory, including gate seal -off, basic trouble shooting and process 
effects are examined. The students have hands-on laboratory 
experience and are responsible for a class presentation. 

Principles of Supervision 

PLAS 2070 3cr. • 

The purpose of this course is to develop an understanding of the 
role and responsibilities of the supervisor and to strengthen values 
and skills related to key supervisory functions. The principles and 
topics addressed include problem solving, decision making, 
leadership, management ethics, and communication. This course is 
recommended for experienced and new supervisors and those 
aspiring to supervisory positions. 

Polymeric Materials, Design, and Application 

PLAS 3060 3cr. • 

This course provides comprehensive coverage of polymeric 
materials, plastic design, and test methodology Material properties, 
characteristics, and application are presented for injection molded 
thermoplastic resins. A discussion of polymer blends and compounds 
using fillers, additives, and reinforcing fibers are included. Property 
identification and the associated test procedure are reviewed with 
hands-on testing provided for the major properties. In addition, 
plastic product design techniques and application are discussed to 
complement the discussion of materials. 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Statistical Process Control 

PLAS 3080 3cr. • 

The student learns the use of Statistical Methods and SRC. to 
improve quality and productivity through measurement, control, and 
reduction of variation in the process. Topics covered include: basic 
statistics, the normal distribution, control chart theory, process 
capability studies and gage and measurement analysis. Simple 
metrology concepts and the basics of geometric dimensioning/ 
tolerancing are also covered. 



Political Science 



United States Government 

POLS 1000 3 cr. 3hr. A • 

In Modern American Government, the major political institutions, 
such as the Presidency, the Congress, and the Supreme Court, are 
examined. Their constitutional antecedents and their modern 
functions are presented. Special attention is given to the current 
bureaucracy, elections, and the political actors in the election process. 
I 

Introduction to Political Science 

POLS 1100 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course represents an introduction to the field of political 
science. Political science is the study of how people interact with one 
another in their communities, whether they are as small as the 
Fitchburg State College campus, or as large as the entire global 
community. The course is divided into the following three sections, 
each of which represents an important sub-field within the 
discipline: political philosophy, American government, and 
international politics. I 

State and Urban Government 

POLS 1500 3cr.3hr. A 

The class focuses upon current issues and politics in urban and state 
government and attempts to evaluate proposed solutions to issues. I 

Global Issues 

IDIS 1800 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

This course examines the interdependency of the world's nations by 
focusing on current events in the international arena and issues such 
as ozone depletion, pollution, the global economy, conflict and 
cooperation, population and hunger. I, IDIS, C 

Contemporary International Relations 

POLS 2200 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course studies critical problems confronting the present 
international system. The "Cold War," armed conflict, internal 
violence, as well as prospects for the resolution of conflict are 
explored. 

Introduction to the Legal Process 

POLS 2270 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

This course serves as an introduction to the American legal system. 
Emphasis is placed on how courts and lawyers function, how cases are 
decided, and the means by which courts interpret legislation. 

Prerequisite: POLS 1000 or 1100. 

Political Systems of the Modern World 

POLS 2500 3cr.3hr. A 

The course provides a comparative analysis of modern national 
governments. The importance of the world's political heritage and the 
implications for the emerging nations of liberal democracy, 
communism, and dictatorship are explored. 

Prerequisites: IDIS 1200 or IDIS 1800. 



Sex, Race and the Constitution 

POLS 2550 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

This course examines the long history of discrimination in the 
United States on the basis of race and gender. It examines in detail 
the guarantee of equal protection of the law found in the 14th 
Amendment to the Constitution and how the meaning of what is 
equal have evolved over time. Topics covered will include how to 
define and measure equality, affirmative action, racial preferences in 
college admissions, voting rights, distinction based on gender, 
equality based on physical differences between men and woman, the 
evolution of the right of privacy, abortion, and sexual harassment. I, 
IDIS 

Prerequisites: POLS 1000 or POLS 1100 or CJ 2000. 

The First Amendment 

POLS 2600 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course examines the basic rights and freedoms derived from the 
First Amendment to the Constitution. The course will examine in 
depth great controversies of freedom of speech, press, and religion. 
Topics covered will include protection for hate speech, speech codes 
on college campuses, prior restraints on the press, and free exercises 
of religion, and governmental limitations on the establishment of 
religion. I 

Prerequisite: POLS 1000 or POLS 1100 or CJ 2000. 

Criminal Procedure: Rights of the Accused 

POLS 2700 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course examines the basic rights and freedoms derived from the 
portions of the Bill of Rights addressing criminal procedure. The 
course will examine in depth the 4th, 5th, 6th and 8th Amendments 
to the Constitution. Topics covered will include protection against 
unreasonable searches and seizures, self-incrimination, double 
jeopardy, due process of law, the right to counsel, to confront 
witnesses, trial by jury, and the meaning of cruel and unusual 
punishment. I 

Prerequisites: POLS 1000 or POLS 1100 or CJ 2000. 

Public Policy Analysis: Case Studies in American Politics 

POLS 3000 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course covers four major divisions of public policy: health, 
education, labor, and welfare. The aim is to attain an understanding of 
how the American political system works through a study of the 
policy that has come out of that system. 

Prerequisite: POLS 1000 or POLS 1500. 

The Conduct of American Foreign Policy 

POLS 3400 3cr.3hr. ▲• 

With the collapse of the Soviet Union, the United States has been 
left as the only global superpower. As a result, American policies 
around the globe, and responses to such global issues as the 
environment, human rights, or nuclear proliferation, have become 
increasingly significant on a national and international level. This 
course will introduce students to American foreign policy. I 

Constitutional Law 

POLS 3500 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

Constitutional Law is the product of 

interpretation, power, and political 

calculation. The collusion and 

collision of these forces produces the 

parameters of our governmental 

system. The U.S. Supreme Court 

over the years has issued many 

decisions which have fundamentally 

shaped and altered the scope and 

distribution of government authority. 

This course is the study of the 

product of these decisions and the 

shaped our current system of 

government. 1 

Prerequisites: POLS 1000 or POLS 1100 or 
POLS 2000. 



Key to Course Offerings 

Q: designates courses in the 
Quantitative Scientific Cluster 

I: the Ideas and Events Cluster 

B: the Human Behavior Cluster 

L: the Literature, Language 
and Arts Cluster 

C Multicultural 

IDIS: Interdisciplinary courses 

Multicultural and interdisciplinary courses also 

fulfill a cluster designation. 

* Asterisk indicates that the course may 
be offered less than once every two years. 

▲ Undergraduate Day School 

• Undergraduate Evening School 

Courses having a more narrow focus than 
those taught on a regular basis or courses 
being taught on an experimental basis can 
be taught as Topics" courses These courses 
will be assigned numbers based on the 
student level for which they are intended — 
first, second, third or fourth year. 



Asian Politics and Culture 

POLS 3700 3cr.3hr. A 

This course introduces the politics and culture of three major Asian 

states: China, Japan, and India. It begins with their philosophy, 

history, and society to give students a basic understanding of the 

Asian peoples and then, approaches their politics. I C 

Prerequisites: IDIS 1200 or IDIS 1800. 

Third World Politics, Economics, and Society 

POLS 3800 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course represents an introduction to the developing nations of 

Africa, Asia, and Latin America. These developing nations have a 

significant impact on global politics. Through an examination of the 

history, politics, economics, and societies of these nations, the 

students will gain a greater understanding of the developing world. I, 

IDIS, C 

Prerequisites: IDIS 1200 or IDIS 1800. 

Moot Court 

POLS 4350 3 cr. 3 hr. 

In this course, students will intensively study a specific area of law for 
the purpose of arguing in a moot court competition. Moot court 
involves teams of student-contestants, "clients" burdened by a legal 
problem, briefs and oratory detailing the dimensions of the legal 
problem before an appellate court, and the judging of performances 
by panels of faculty and attorneys. The top teams emerging from this 
course will be eligible to represent the college at the national 
tournament. 

Independent Study in Political Science 

POLS 4900 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

The Independent Study is open to students who have the permission 
of the supervising instructor and the department. The course of study, 
meetings, and credit are arranged upon approval. 

Legal Internship 

POLS 4905 3cr.l0hr. A 

Internships are available in several regional law offices for those 
persons interested in paralegal work. These internships prepare 
students for positions in law offices, public administration, and other 
human services work. 

Legal Internship 

POLS 4915 6 cr. 20 hr. A 

(See description above.) 

Legal Internship 

POLS 4920 9 cr. 30 hr. A 

Legal Internship 

POLS 4925 12 cr. 40 hr. A 

(See description above.) 

Internships in Political Science 

POLS 4940 312 cr. A 

Off-campus opportunities, carrying appropriate academic credit, are 
available in local, state, and federal government offices and with 
political campaigns. Internships are open to students who have the 
permission of the department Credit and hours are arranged by 
special permission. 

Directed Study 

POLS 4975 1-6 cr. 



Psychology 



General Psychology 

PSY 1100 3cr.3hr. A • 

The course introduces the student to the contemporary discipline of 
the science of human behavior and mental processes. Topics 
investigated include the scientific method, biological bases of 
behavior, maturation, motivation, emotions, learning, personality, 
and adjustment. The course is prerequisite for all other courses in 
Psychology. B 



Introduction to Research Methods 

PSY 2110 3 cr. 3hr. A • 

The emphasis in this course is on research design, including 
consideration of sampling procedures, questionnaire design, 
methods of observation, and reporting. Q 

Prerequisite: PSY 1100. 

Psychological Statistics 

PSY 2120 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course expands upon the mathematical concepts introduced in 
Math 1700. Descriptive statistics are reviewed and inferential 
statistics are introduced. Analyses considered include t-tests and 
analysis of variance up to and including factorial designs. Computer 
analysis is also emphasized. The class meets partial LAS requirement 
for computer literacy in Psychology major. 

Prerequisites: PSY 1100, PSY 2110, and MATH 1700. 

The Psychology of Speech and Communication 

PSY 2160 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course provides information for judging speech behaviors of 
self and others Topics such as concepts of speech, language and 
communication, effective speaking and listening behaviors, non- 
verbal communication, animal communication, linguistic and 
psycholinguistic theory are covered. The class meets LAS speaking 
and listening requirement for the Psychology major. B 

Prerequisite: PSY 1100. 

Human Growth and Development 

PSY 2200 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

This life-span course emphasizes a study of the physical, 

physiological, social, and psychological development of the 

individual from conception to old age. B 
Prerequisite: PSY 1100. (Cannot be used as credit toward the major, but may be 

used for the minor.) 

Child Psychology 

PSY 2210 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

This course offers an introductory overview of the developing child 

from conception through preadolescence. Theories and research are 

used to lay the foundation for the study of the physical, cognitive, 

social, and emotional development of the child. Also considered are 

such topics as attachment, moral development, language acquisition, 

and genetic and environmental influences on development. This 

course meets the Office for Children requirement for Category-A 

daycare certification. B 

Prerequisite: PSY 1100. 

Adolescent Psychology 

PSY 2230 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

Adolescence as a stage of development and as a cultural 

phenomenon is investigated in this course. The influence of 

physical, cognitive, and psychosocial factors on the adolescent's 

search for identity is examined. Emphasis is on an interdisciplinary 

approach that draws on relevant theories and research from a wide 

range of fields. B 

Prerequisite: PSY 1100. 

Adult Development 

PSY 2240 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course introduces the student to theories and research for the 

periods of young and middle adulthood. Physical, mental, and 

personality processes are covered, as well as issues and problems of 

research in adult development. Application of this knowledge to 

adults in their relationships and in their work settings is stressed. B 

Prerequisite: PSY 1100. 

Psychology of Women 

PSY 2250 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

Objectives of this course include an increased awareness of the 

psychological development of women and of the dimensions of self 

and personhood in relation to society. The examination and analysis 

of issues relative to current debate concerning the status of women is 

explored. 

Prerequisite: PSY 1100. 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Gerontology: The Psychology of Growing Old 

PSY 2260 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course examines the developmental changes, including both 

gains and losses, which occur in the later part of the life span. The 

course focuses on theory and research related to biological, physical, 

cognitive, and psychosocial changes that occur in late life. The 

emphasis is on understanding the normal aging process. Research 

methods and designs used to study aging are also covered. B 

Prerequisite: PSY 1100. 

Psychology of Human Sexuality 

PSY 2280 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course includes a study of the relationships among the various 
aspects of sexuality, including relationships, social norms, and cross- 
cultural variations in sexual behavior. B 

Prerequisite: PSY 1100. 

Psychology of Personality 

PSY 2300 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

Dynamic factors in personality formation are studied through some 

of the leading theoretical positions on personality development. 

Prerequisite: PSY 1100. 

Psychology of Death and Dying 

PSY 2320 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

Through lectures, readings, discussions, and media, students explore 
psychological theory, research, and personal feelings concerning the 
dying process, suicide, grief, sudden death, and dying as it influences 
persons at different developmental stages. B 

Prerequisite: PSY 1100. 

Psychology of Intimacy 

PSY 2330 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

This course examines the dynamics of partner selection and the 
process of creating a relationship that maximizes the development of 
personal integrity and interpersonal security. B 

Prerequisite: PSY 1100. 

Abnormal Psychology 

PSY 2350 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

The course reviews normal, neurotic, and psychotic behavior as well 
as methods of psychotherapy. Techniques for maintaining optimal 
psychological health are emphasized B 

Prerequisite: PSY 1100. 

Interpersonal Effectiveness 

PSY 2370 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

This is a lab-based course which introduces and develops 
interpersonal competence, particularly as it pertains to dyadic 
situations. Basic skill areas such as observation, listening, and 
questioning are addressed, as are integrative skills, such as conflict 
resolution and relationship development. Students are asked to 
become more aware of their own interpersonal behavior, and are 
introduced to the extensive research literature on interpersonal 
behavior. Applications in both the personal and the professional 
domain are addressed. The class meets LAS speaking and listening 
requirement for the Psychology major. B 

Prerequisite: PSY 1100. 

Psychology of Captivity 

PSY 2400 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course deals with the effects of captivity on both the captive 
and the captor. Materials include films, tapes, interviews, first- 
person accounts, systematic studies of experiences, and the long- 
term consequences on persons involved as well as on their children. 

Prerequisite: PSY 1100. 

Psychological Testing 

PSY 2450 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

This course is designed to give students a broad understanding of 
the theory and use of psychological testing. Methods of test 
evaluation, analysis, and interpretation are presented. Standardized 
testing instruments used to measure human cognitive and affective 
factors are explored and their purposes reviewed. 
Prerequisite: PSY 1100 and satisfaction of the math readiness requirement 



Social Psychology 

PSY 2500 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course provides an introduction to the study of human social 
behavior. Representative topics include attitudes and their formation, 
aggression, prosocial behavior, conformity, and interpersonal 
attraction, as well as group dynamics, structure, and leadership. The 
application of social-psychological research to contemporary social 
problems is also considered. B 

Prerequisite: PSY 1100. 

Group Dynamics 

PSY 2550 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

The nature and dynamics of interpersonal relationships are revealed 
in typical group settings, such as classrooms, workshop seminars, and 
other discussion-oriented groups. Emphasis is on both content and 
process as demonstrated in a laboratory learning environment. The 
class meets LAS speaking and listening requirement for the 
Psychology major. B 

Prerequisite: PSY 1100. 

Small Group Leadership 

PSY 2570 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course is designed to equip students for planning and 
conducting meetings requiring the coordination of small groups of 
people. Participants study and practice basic leadership skills 
applicable to a variety of small group settings. They develop and 
demonstrate these skills in the context of small group participation 
in class and as leaders of extra class groups. The class meets LAS 
speaking and listening requirement for the Psychology major. 

Prerequisite: PSY 1100. 

Organizational Psychology 

PSY 2610 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

This course examines organizational influences on motivation and 

satisfaction of the workforce. Methods of surveying organizational 

climate are introduced, and a variety of intervention methods are 

evaluated. Organizational experience in Japan, Western Europe, and 

the United States are analyzed and compared. B 

Prerequisite: PSY 1100. 

Work and the Individual 

PSY 2620 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course considers the ways in which individuals meet their needs 
for growth and development, while the organization meets its needs 
for worker productivity. How the organization's needs affect workers 
and how workers react to these pressures are subjects studied. Topics 
include work as a basic human need, relationships with co-workers, 
interpersonal skills, uses of power influence, leading and motivating 
others, meeting personal needs/job satisfaction, adaptation to 
change, problems in adaptation (alcohol, drugs, lack of competence, 
etc.), stress management, and career development. B 

Prerequisite: PSY 1100. 

Human Factors/ Ergonomics 

PSY 2630 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

Students develop the ability to fit the 
demands of people and work 
together. Competence is developed 
in tailoring work conditions and 
equipment to facilitate human 
performance and in identifying the 
skills required by the job. 

Prerequisite: PSf 1100. 



Key to Course Offerings 

Q: designates courses in the 
Quantitative Scientific Cluster 

I: the Ideas and Events Ouster 

B: the Human Behavior Cluster 

L: the Literature, Language 
and Arts Cluster 

C: Multicultural 

ID1S: Interdisciplinary courses 

Multicultural and interdisciplinary courses also 

fulfill a cluster designation. 

* Asterisk indicates that the course may 
be offered less than once every two years. 

A Undergraduate Day School 

• Undergraduate Evening School 

Courses having a more narrow focus than 
those taught on a regular basis or courses 
being taught on an experimental basis can 
be taught as 'Topics" courses. These courses 
will be assigned numbers based on the 
student level for which they are intended — 
first, second, third or fourth year. 



Psychology of Human Resources 

PSY 2645 3 cr. 3 hr. A 9 

This course addresses the psychological theory and research 
concerning human resource systems in organizations. The course 
covers methods of job analysis, development and use of assessment 
tools to select employees, performance measurement and appraisal, 
and employee training and development. The course also addresses 
the legal and ethical issues of discrimination in the work setting. B 

Prerequisite: PSY 1100. 

Organizational Leadership 

PSY 2655 3cr.3hr. A* 

This course provides a treatment of the major issues in personnel 

psychology and emphasizes the psychological aspects of personnel 

systems The focus of the course is on the psychological assessment 

of potential and current employees as a means for "fitting" workers 

into jobs. Emphasis is also placed on the employment discrimination 

issues that may emerge in the work setting and the use and 

interpretation of descriptive and inferential statistics in personnel 

decision making. B 

Prerequisite: PSY 1100. 

Learning Theory and Its Applications 

PSY 2710 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course focuses on the principles and theories of learning, as 
derived by both the laboratory psychologist and the educational 
researcher. Those theories are applied to various social settings, 
including the classroom, the family, etc. B 

Prerequisite: PSY 1100. 

Tests and Measurements 

PSY 2750 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course is a study of the basic statistical concepts and techniques 

of measurement. Emphasis is placed upon the application of these 

techniques to teacher-made tests and standardized tests used in 

education and psychology. B 
Prerequisite: PSY 1100. (Cannot be used as credit toward the major but may 

be used for the minor.) 

Principles of Guidance 

PSY 2770 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course introduces students to the psychological theory and 
research underpinning practice in school guidance counseling. 

Prerequisite: PSY 1100. 

Addictive Behavior 

PSY 2950 3 cr. 3 hr. 

This course is designed for students who plan a career in the helping 

professions (including education), or who wish to understand the 

cognitive, emotional, social and biological correlates of alcohol and 

other drug abuse, or other addictive behaviors. A framework is 

presented for viewing such compulsive behaviors as part of a 

continuum from "normal" to dysfunctional," and controversies in the 

field are discussed. Students will be exposed to models of addiction, a 

classification of drugs, prevention of alcohol and other drug abuse, 

and information necessary to work with clients who are affected by 

addiction, including assessment and diagnosis, modalities of 

treatment, the role of support groups and relapse prevention, In 

addition to lectures and class discussions students are required to 

attend community support group meetings and to participate in a 

community prevention project (e.g., the Great American Smokeout). 

This course is cross-listed as HMSV 2950. 

Prerequisite: PSY 1100. 

Advanced Child Psychology 

PSY 3220 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course explores in greater depth principles and theories learned 
in PSY 2110 and acquaints the student with methodology used in 
contemporary research in child psychology Through assigned 
exercises and individual projects, students focus on selected issues in 
child development. Students work directly with children in applying 

the principles and techniques learned in the course. Q B 

Prerequisites: PSY 2210 or PSY 2230, PSY 2110, PSY 2120, MATH 1700, a 

2.5 cumulative average in Psychology and overall, and permission of 

Instructor. Strongly recommended: PSY 3140. 



Experimental Psychology 

PSY 3410 4 cr. 4 hr. A 

This course is an analysis and study of the scientific method, 
experimental designs, and laboratory methods in behavioral science, 
emphasizing laboratory experiments and scientific communication of 
results. Students design, analyze, and report their own research. 
Computer data analysis is also covered. The course meets LAS junior/ 
senior writing requirement as well as LAS requirement for computer 

literacy for the Psychology major. 
Prerequisites: PSY 2110, 2120, and MATH 1700; junior or senior standing in 

the major, permission of Instructor. 

Physiological Psychology 

PSY 3420 3cr.3hr. A 

This course concentrates on the relationship between the nervous 
system and behavior The experiments and theories of several 
disciplines that have contributed to this understanding are studied, 
including neuroanatomy, physiology, biochemistry and psychology. 
The course is designed to introduce and familiarize students with 
relevant information from each of these fields. Topics include 
hormones and sexual and aggressive behaviors, brain regulation of 
sleeping and dreaming,- genetic, anatomical, physiological and 
neurochemical bases of emotions and mental disorders, biological, 
neural, and biochemical basis of learning and memory. Special 
emphasis is given to current research results in neuroscience and 
their implications for clinical application. Q, B, IDIS 

Prerequisite: PSY 1100. 

Perception 

PSY 3430 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

In this course principles related to a person's awareness of his or her 
world are studied. We specifically look at the relationship between 
the physical stimulus and the psychological experience that a person 
has. The questions we answer relate to the how and why we 
experience the word in the way that we do In the process of 
studying sensation and perception we evaluate the nature of the 
physical stimulus (e.g. light),- the physiological/sensory mechanisms 
necessary for the receptions, transduction and transmission of the 
physical information that is carried to the brain as a coded nerve 
impulse, and how the brain interprets the physical event as a 
psychological experience. Topics covered include principles of 
psychophysics the anatomy/physiology of the visual, auditory, 
chemical (olfactory and gustatory) and tactile/cutaneous senses, the 
nature and properties of the physical stimuli that these senses 
respond to, and the factors that influence the interpretation of these 
senses such as culture, learning/past experience, motivation, 
expectations and personality Q, B, IDIS 

Prerequisite: PSY U00. 

History and Systems of Psychology 

PSY 3480 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This advanced course provides a consideration of contemporary 

psychology as seen in its historical perspective. The development of 

psychological concepts and theories is traced from their antecedents 

in philosophy and the physical sciences. 

Prerequisites: junior/senior standing, PSY 2110 and one course from the 
following: PSY 3420, PSY 3430, PSY 3500, PSY 3530, or PSY 3550. 

Psychology of Learning 

PSY 3500 3cr.3hr. A 

This course focuses on principles and theories of learning, including 

classical conditioning, operant conditioning, verbal learning, and 

acquisition of motor skills. 

Prerequisite: PSY 1100. 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Motivation 

PSY 3530 3 cr. 3 hr. ▲ • 

Characteristics of motivated behavior, explanation of sources of 

motives, and application of theories to current research and 

interpersonal skills are studied in this course. Emphasis is on the 

biological, learned, and cognitive components of motivation. Topics 

include internal and external motives, the relationship of stress and 

motivation, the place of physiological processes in motivation, issues 

in motivation of others, motivation for aggressive/passive behaviors, 

and success/failure motivation. B 

Prerequisite: PSY 1100. 

Cognition 

PSY 3550 3cr.3hr. A 

Serving as foundations for this course are the neuroscience of 

cognition and the historical roots upon which our present 

understanding of human information processing rests. Specific topic 

areas include attention, semantic and episodic memory, 

comprehension, categorization, language, problem-solving, and 

reasoning. Artificial intelligence and the emergence of cognitive 

science are also considered. Methodology is emphasized throughout 

the course as students consider classic research studies and apply 

various techniques in classroom exercises. B 

Prerequisite: PSY 1100. 

Teaching Practicum 

PSY 4800 6 cr. 18 hr. A 

PSY 4803 3 cr. 9 hr. A 

Students assist an individual faculty member in the teaching of 
Psychology. Responsibilities vary with the course. The Teaching 
Practicum is offered by invitation of faculty only. 

Prerequisite: 3.0 cumulative average overall and in the major. 

Practicum in Psychology 

PSY 4810 3cr.9hr. A 

PSY 4820 6 cr. 18 hr. A 

Students perform basic and applied work in Psychology. Students 
work with staff in areas of mutual interest. 

Prerequisite: a 2.5 cumulative average in psychology and permission of the 

Instructor. 

Independent Study 

PSY 4900 1-6 cr. 318 hr. A • 

This experience is offered primarily to Psychology students of junior 
or senior standing, and requires approval of the professor and of the 
Psychology Curriculum Committee. The student must petition the 
Psychology Curriculum Committee the semester prior to undertaking 
the Independent Study. Independent Study may take the form of 
special advanced reading programs, problem identification and 
research, assistantships, or for acquisition of professional skills. Under 
no circumstances is Independent Study substituted for regularly 
scheduled courses. Independent Study may be taken for 1 to 6 
semester hours. 

Prerequisite: 3.0 cumulative average in the major. 

Advanced Psychology Seminar 

PSY 4920 3cr.3hr. A 

In this course students pursue advanced study in their discipline. 
Students complete a supervised research report and meet in a weekly 
seminar to discuss their projects and other research topics and issues. 
Prerequisite: PSY 2110, 2120, 3410, MATH 1700. 



Internship in Psychology 

PSY 4950 Scr.lShr. A 

Through an Internship the student experiences the relationship 
between courses in Psychology and their applications in the field. 
Work is carried on in settings approved by the department, faculty 
member, and an on-site supervisor. Internships are available in service 
agencies, business, and industry. Each Internship presupposes specific 
course background. Students are encouraged to discuss Internship 
plans with their advisors early in their college experience Interested 
students must contact the Psychology Coordinator early in the prior 
semester of the year in which the Internship is desired Business and 
industry Internships are offered only in the spring semester and some 
direct service Internships are available during the fall semester as well. 
Liability insurance is required of all students enrolled in this course. 

Prerequisites: 2.5 cumulative average overall and in the major; 

program approval. 

Internship in Psychology 

PSY 4960 12 cr. 36 hr. A 

Please refer to the preceding description and prerequisites for PSY 
4950. 

Directed Study 

PSY 4975 1-6 cr. 



Russian 



Russian for Beginners I 

*RUSS 1000 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The correct pronunciation, reading ability, and fundamentals of 
grammar and syntax are taught in this class. Over the semester 
Russian gradually becomes the working classroom and laboratory 
language. L, C 

Russian for Beginners II 

*RUSS 1100 3cr.3hr. A 

L, C 

Intermediate Russian I 

'RUSS 2000 3cr.3hr. A 

The course involves remedial pronunciation, grammar review, 
conversation, and laboratory practice with Russian as the working 
language. Assigned readings stress USSR life, customs, and culture. 

Prerequisite: two years of high school Russian or RUSS 1100 and/or 

permission of Instructor. 

Intermediate Russian II 

'RUSS 2100 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course is a continuation of RUSS 2000. 

Dostoevsky and Tolstoy (in English) 

RUSS 2400 3cr.3hr. A 

This course provides an in depth comparative study of the two 

giants of Russian 19th century literature. Contrasts in biography 

themes and styles are examined. The 

class is facilitated through lectures 

and readings in English, a standard 

length paper, a midterm, and final 

examination. I, L, C, IDIS 



Russian Literature in English 
Translation 

RUSS 2500 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course is a seminar on a specific 
topic from Russian literature, such as 
Soviet Literature or the modern 
Russian novel. Lectures and readings 
in English emphasize significant 
works in Russian and Soviet 
literature. A midterm and final 
examination and a standard length 
paper are required class work. The 
class may be repeated for credit. I, L, 
C, IDIS 



Key to Course Offerings 

Q: designates courses in the 
Quantitative Scientific Cluster 

I: the Ideas and Events Cluster 

B: the Human Behavior Cluster 

L: the Literature, Language 
and Arts Cluster 

C Multicultural 

IDIS: Interdisciplinary courses 

Multicultural and interdisciplinary counts also 

juljill a cluster designation. 

* Asterisk indicates that the course may 
be offered less than once every two years. 

▲ Undergraduate Day School 

• Undergraduate Evening School 

Courses having a more narrow focus than 
those taught on a regular basis or courses 
being taught on an experimental basis can 
be taught as Topics" courses. These courses 
will be assigned numbers based on the 
student level for which they are intended — 
first, second, third or fourth year. 









■ i 



Russian Culture and Soviet Life (in English) 

RUSS 2600 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course provides an introduction to Russian life and culture as 
manifested in Russian geography, art, music, film, and literature. 
National characteristics of the Russian people and their influence on 
Soviet institutions are explored as well as everyday life in the Soviet 
Union. The course includes a significant audio-visual component. 
I, L, C, IDIS 

Independent Study in Russian 

RUSS 4901 1 cr. 1 hr. A 

Independent Study in Russian 

RUSS 4903 3 cr. 3 hr. ▲ 

The Independent Study is open to students studying the language 
with the permission of the supervising instructor and the Department 
Chairman. Meeting times and credit are arranged with approval. 

Science Education 

These courses are only offered through 
Continuing Education. 

General Botany 

SCED 1000 

(see BIOL 1400) 

Nutrition 

SCED 2000 

(see BIOL 1650) 

Human Sexuality 

SCED 2001 

The biological aspects of human sexuality The purpose of this course 
is to relate information rather than to advise 

Winter Botany 

SCED 3000 

An out-of-doors study of the environment during the winter. Daily 
field trips to study both aquatic and terrestrial plants to discover how 
they adapt to the cold weather condition. 

Common Rocks and Minerals 

SCED 3270 

(see CEOG 3270) 

Introduction to Astronomy 

SCED 4000 

(see PHYS 2000) 



Sociology 



Introduction to Sociology 

SOC 1100 3 cr. 3hr. A • 

The course encourages the student to analyze critically the social 
world, which he or she inhabits. Major theoretical orientations and 
major concepts of the discipline are reviewed. Social institutions such 
as Family, Education, and Medicine are examined, and different 
research techniques used by sociologists are introduced. This course 
is a prerequisite for all other sociology courses. B, C 

Cultural Anthropology 

SOC 2250 3 cr. 3 hr. ▲ • 

The course introduces students to varying cultures. Attention is 
given to hunting and gathering, pastoral, horticultural, agricultural, 
and industrial societies. Cultural change imposed by 
industrialization and technological revolution in both third world 
and modern societies is also analyzed and discussed. The intent of 
the course is to give students knowledge about the development and 
variability of cultures, living styles, and values, so that they are 
prepared to tackle elusive questions of the capabilities, limits, and 
future of human societies. B, C 



Sociology of Aging 

SOC 2300 3 cr. 3 hr. ▲ 

This course examines the socially defined aged, the aging process, 
and aging societies. It considers such topics as age roles, the status of 
the elderly across cultures and across history, and the downward 
mobility of the elderly in American society. B 

Urban Sociology 

SOC 2440 3 cr. 3 hr. ▲ 

This course provides a survey of urbanization and the various 
problems associated with contemporary urban life. Computer- 
assisted analysis of large-scale data sets helps students explore the 
issues in planning development. A cross-cultural and historical 
approach to American urban life is emphasized. B 

Race and Ethnic Relations 

SOC 2500 3 cr. 3 hr. ▲ • 

This course provides a comparative, historical, and interdisciplinary 
introduction to interactions between racial and ethnic populations in 
the U.S. and other societies Students explore social attitudes and 
consequences of racial and ethnic difference, and examine how such 
differences affect the lives of American people. Consideration is 
given to the political, economic, legal, and socio-cultural 
experiences of various minority groups. B, I, C, IDIS 

Peoples and Cultures of Africa 

SOC 2510 3 cr. 3 hr. ▲ 

A survey of the peoples and cultures of Africa is the major focus of 
this course. This course examines the social and cultural systems of 
groups including the Ibo, Yoruba, Hausa-Fulani, Kpelle, Bantu 
Tiriki, Canda, Jie, Rwana, Swazi, and Pastoral Somali. B, C 

Drugs and Alcohol 

SOC 2520 3 cr. 3 hr. ▲ • 

In this course, students explore sociological issues revolving around 
drug and alcohol use and abuse in the American society. Topics of 
discussion include: the socio-historical origins of drugs and alcohol 
use from a cross-cultural perspective, effects of formal organizations 
such as drug rehabilitation and alcoholic centers on drug users,- and 
"Push factors" such as family, work, and economic pressures, as they 
relate to chemical dependency. Also investigated are society's drug 
problems in terms of legal and illegal drug use, medical versus 
recreational use of psychoactive drugs, alcoholic beverages, and 
tobacco, and definitions and classifications of psychoactive 
substances. B 

Sociology of Developing Societies 

SOC 2600 3cr.3hr. ▲ 

This course provides a survey of the socioeconomic characteristics 
and features of the developing societies in the context of historical 
and contemporary experiences of those societies. One of the 
primary objectives of the course is to critically analyze how the 
socioeconomic characteristics of the less developed societies affect 
and are affected by their relationships with developed Western 
societies and their implications for development. The role of women 
in development and the impact of development on women also are 
examined. 
I, B, C, IDIS 

Sociology of Religion 

SOC 2620 3 cr. 3 hr. ▲ 

The course emphasizes the structure and function of religious 
organizations, beliefs, and practices. Current issues in American 
religion are also explored B 

Sociology of the Family 

SOC 2630 3 cr. 3 hr. ▲ • 

The course analyzes the structure and function of the family. 
Current trends along with practical solutions to problems of family 
living are discussed. B 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Sociology of Organizations 

*SOC 2650 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course introduces the study of work organizations as social 
systems. The impact of technological change and the effects of 
structural factors on organizations are considered. Approaches to 
organization diagnosis and development are discussed. B 

Social Problems 

SOC 2700 3 cr. 3 hr. ▲ • 

The course examines underlying dynamics and consequences of 
contemporary social conditions believed to be both undesirable and 
changeable. Strategies for resolving social problems in the 
environmental, economic, family, medical, political, and legal spheres 
are analyzed and compared. B 

Medical Sociology 

SOC 2720 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

In this course, students explore the effects of stratification on health 
status and health care. Topics discussed in class include 
communication between physicians and patients of different socio- 
cultural backgrounds, formal organizational studies of health facilities 
such as hospitals, clinics, or doctors' offices, social factors and their 
relation to chronic illness, and the sociology of mental illness. Also 
investigated are the relationships between doctors and nurses, the 
organization and utilization of health services, the comparative 
examination of health systems either within a society or in a cross- 
cultural perspective, and the perception of illness as deviant or 
aberrant behavior. B 

Criminology 

SOC 2750 3 cr. 3 hr. ▲ • 

This course provides a survey of the field of criminology, including 
such topics as theories of crime, criminal statistics, homicide, rape, 
property crimes, white collar crimes and corporate deviance, and 
debates on punishment and rehabilitation. B 

Juvenile Delinquency 

*S0C 2760 3cr.3hr. ▲• 

This course examines major sociological theories of delinquency 
including an analysis of empirical studies. Attention is also given to 
the juvenile judicial system and proposed treatment programs. B 

Sociology of Education 

SOC 2800 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course provides an introduction to the ways sociologists think 
about educational goals, processes, and outcomes. Students 
investigate a variety of historical, theoretical, and substantive issues, 
including: the development of the U.S. public education systems, the 
"distribution" of education in society, the "players" in the system,- the 
influence of social factors on educational experiences, and educational 
reform. B 

Social Stratification 

SOC 3000 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

The course provides a critical examination of the dominant 
perspectives and dimensions of social stratification, using a cross- 
cultural, historical, and interdisciplinary framework. Particular 
attention is paid to the analysis of U.S. class structure and the effects 
of social stratification on life chances of groups. B, I, C, IDIS 

Basic Skills of Social Research 

SOC 3130 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course emphasizes the aims and techniques of various research 
methods as applied to sociological study and practice Topics covered 
in class include a critical examination of literature reviews, 
interviewing, observation, questionnaire development, data entry, and 
quantitative computer analysis of data. The course meets LAS 
Computer Literacy for Sociology majors requirement. Q 

Prerequisites: SOC 1100 and sophomore status. 



Application of Social Research in the Work Setting 

*S0C 3140 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course provides a deeper understanding of techniques of social 
research than SOC 21 30. The application of such techniques to 
consumer behavior, business and government organizations, and 
social agencies, is examined. 

Social Theory 

SOC 3160 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course studies social philosophy precursors, sociological 
scientific theorists from Comte to Parsons, and contemporary 
schools of thought in Sociology. The course meets LAS Writing 
requirement for Sociology majors. B 

Prerequisite: Social Research and two intermediate level Sociology courses or 

permission of Instructor. 

Law and Society 

SOC 3500 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course focuses on law as a practical resource. Students examine 
how the availability of law is distributed in society,- what the law 
provides for those who use it, and how the law has been influenced 
by certain trends of use. Students study ways in which the law has 
been analyzed, and discover the nature of legal evolution and social 

change. B 

Prerequisites: two intermediate level sociology courses or permission of 

Instructor. 

Women in American Society 

SOC 3770 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This seminar course examines the statuses, roles, expectations, and 

realities of women, particularly as experienced in the contemporary 

U.S. Patterns and differences among women's lives are explored 

through a variety of readings, class discussions, and writing projects. 

(Cross listed in Women's Studies IDIS 2340) B, C, IDIS 
Prerequisite: two intermediate level sociology courses, or permission of Instructor. 

Independent Study 

SOC 4900 1-6 cr. 318 hr. A • 

A program of study designed for in-depth learning in a specific topic 
for which no regular course is available. This Independent Study is 
only for Sociology majors and may be taken no more than two 
times with permission of faculty. Independent Study requires 
approval of the professor and of the Sociology Curriculum 
Committee. 

Prerequisite: 3.0 cumulative average in the major. 

Internship in Sociology 

SOC 4960 6 cr. 15 hr. A 

The Internship is arranged in consultation with faculty and carried 
out under the auspices of an approved agency or program at the 
local, state or federal level. This experience is designed to develop 
skills in sociological practice, principles, and/or research. Students 
are encouraged to discuss Internship plans with their advisors early 
in their college experience, as there are specific procedures and 
required courses. Liability insurance is required of all students 

enrolled in this course. 

Prerequisite: junior or senior standing, 

2.5 cumulative average in the major, 

program approval. 

Internship in Sociology 

SOC 4970 12 cr. 30 hr. A 

See SOC 4960 for description and 
prerequisites. 



Directed Study 

SOC 4975 1-6 cr. 



▲ • 



Key to Course Offerings 

Q: designates courses in the 
Quantitative Scientific Cluster 

1: the Ideas and Events Ouster 

B: the Human Behavior Cluster 

L the Literature, Language 
and Arts Cluster 

C: Multicultural 

IDIS: Interdisciplinary courses 

Multicultural and inuriisciphmry counts also 

fulfill a clusttr dtsi$nati<m. 

* Asterisk indicates that the course may 
be offered less than once every two years. 

▲ Undergraduate Day School 

• Undergraduate Evening School 

Courses having a more narrow focus than 
those taught on a regular basis or courses 
being taught on an experimental basis can 
be taught as Topics" courses. These courses 
will be assigned numbers based on the 
student level for which they are intended — 
first, second, third or fourth year. 



■ 



■ m 






Spanish 



SPAN 4975 1-6 cr. 



Spanish for Beginners I 

SPAN 1000 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

The correct pronunciation, reading ability, and fundamentals of 
grammar and syntax of the Spanish language are studied. Students 
are taught the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading, 
and writing. Cultural topics are integrated with these skills. Spanish 
gradually becomes the working classroom language. Students with a 
year or more of high school Spanish should register for Spanish 
2000. L, C 

Spanish for Beginners II 

SPAN 1100 3 cr. 3hr. ▲ • 

The course is a continuation of SPAN 1000 or is taken with 
permission of Instructor. L, C 

Intermediate Spanish I 

SPAN 2000 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

The course focuses on a discussion of advanced grammar points and 

readings dealing with Spanish life. Emphasis is on developing 

conversational fluency. L, C 

Prerequisite: SPAN 1000 or permission of Instructor. 

Intermediate Spanish II 

SPAN 2100 3 cr. 3hr. ▲ • 

The course is a continuation of SPAN 2000 or is taken by 
permission of Instructor. L, C 

Hispanic Culture 

SPAN 2600 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This course is designed to provide students with a knowledge and 

understanding of the Hispanic world through a study of the historical 

and cultural development of different countries Emphasis is placed on 

contemporary problems and social customs of the Hispanic population 

in the USA. L, C. 

Prerequisite: SPAN 2100 or permission of Instructor. 

Hispanic Literature 

SPAN 2700 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course focuses on selected works reflecting the Hispanic 
heritage in contemporary Spanish and Latin American literature. L, 

C 

Prerequisite: SPAN 2100 or permission of Instructor. 

Spanish Conversation and Composition 

SPAN 3500 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

This course is designed to teach skills that increase the student's 

overall ability to read, speak, and write the language. Students are 

expected to write compositions on topics developed in class. L, C 

Prerequisite: SPAN 2100 or permission of Instructor. 

Practical Spanish for the Public Services Professional I 

SPAN 4000 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

The course teaches practical Spanish to enable people in public 
services, human services, nursing, medical technology, special 
education to communicate with their clients. Special emphasis is 
placed on the cultural and psychological characteristics of Spanish 
speaking peoples. L, C 

Practical Spanish for the Public Services Professional II 

SPAN 4100 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

The course is a continuation of SPAN 4000 or is taken by 
permission of Instructor. L, C 

Independent Study in Spanish 

SPAN 490103 1-3 cr. 1-3 hr. A • 

The Independent Study is open to students in the language with the 
permission of the supervising Instructor and the Department 
Chairman Meeting times and credit are arranged upon approval. 

Advanced Independent Study in Spanish 

SPAN 4906 6cr.6hr. ▲• 



Special Education 



Foundations in Special Education 

SPED 2100 3 cr. 3 hrs. 

The historical foundations of education, leading up to the creation of 
our current educational system will be traced. Teacher candidates will 
examine various philosophies of education and determine the aspects 
of these philosophies that they embrace as future teachers. The 
qualities of effective schools and school systems in meeting the needs 
of diverse learners will be identified. The impact of laws and 
litigation on the development of our current system will be traced. 
Students will explore the ever-changing and evolving role of the 
special education teacher, and reflect upon their needs as teacher 
candidates. 

Introduction to individuals with Disabilities 

SPED 2150 3 cr. 3 hrs. 

The course focuses on the characteristics, behavioral, social, and 
learning needs of children and adults with special needs. Emphasis is 
placed on the total special education delivery system, controversies 
and issues in the field, relevant state and federal legislation, and court 
cases. Field experience required. 

Students with Physical and Health Care Needs 

SPED 2510 3 cr. 3 hrs. 

Students examine various physical and health conditions common in 
children with special needs. Health care plans are developed along 
with effective implementation strategies. Collaborative models for 
working with health card professionals and related service providers 
will be examined. Field experience required. 

Prerequisites: SPED 2150. 

Language Arts: Teaching and Adapting Instruction 

SPED 2522 3 cr. 3 hrs. 

This course focuses on research-based approaches to teaching 
children with special needs Students develop skills in assessments, 
planning and designing materials, and teaching children with diverse 
learning needs. 

Pre-requisites: SPED 2150 or permission of instructor. 

Math/Science/Social Studies 
for the Inclusive Classroom 

SPED 2530 3 cr. 3 hrs. 

This course is designed to address the basic concepts and issues in 

developing and modifying curriculum in mathematics, science, and 

social studies while analyzing current research-based approach to 

instruction. Students examine various service delivery models and 

strategies for meeting the challenges of creating inclusive classrooms 

that address the educational needs of all students. The curriculum 

presented is based on the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks in 

each discipline. 

Prerequisites: SPED 2150 or permission of instructor. 

Language Development and Speech 

SPED 3401 3 cr. 3 hrs. 

The course addresses the normal development of speech and 

language, and disorders associated with each of these areas of 

communication. Students demonstrate a knowledge of 

phonological problems and language disorders as they affect 

academic learning. In the area of language/learning disorders 

students demonstrate an understanding of delayed language and 

language disabilities as they relate to reading, mathematics, and 

written language. Students analyze second language acquisition and 

educational practices related to linguistic minority students. A 

related field experience is required. 

Prerequisites: SPED 2150 and SPED 2522. 



Directed Study 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Ma th/Science/Sociai Studies for Students 
with Disabilities 

SPED 3420 3 cr. 3 hrs. 

This course is designed to demonstrate a hands-on approach to 
teaching Math, Science, and Social Studies with a range of 
modifications for students with disabilities. Participants explore 
instructional strategies that will enable them to implement the 
curricula within inclusive settings as well as in substantially separate 
sites. Teacher Candidates explore how to supplement traditional 
textbooks with hands-on investigative activities that teach to the 
learning styles of students. Math, Science and Social Studies topics 
across the curriculum are stressed. Teacher Candidates are introduced 
to various types of assessment techniques utilized by both classroom 
and special education teachers. The Department of Education 
Curriculum Frameworks in the three content areas will be discussed 
and reviewed. 

Prerequisites: SPED 2150 or permission of instructor. 

Reading/Learning Problems 

SPED 3440 3 cr. 3 hrs 

This course is designed to provide multiple perspectives and essential 
topics for teaching reading in the elementary school and it specifies 
how to assess students and how to use assessment results to provide 
effective reading instruction. Students develop a knowledge base 
concerning the skills involved in the total reading process and factors 
which affect the acquisition of the reading skills and assessment 
procedures to plan appropriate teaching strategies. Topics covered 
include the nature of the reading process, the relationship between 
language, reading and writing, the use of assessment instruments, 
planning teaching strategies, examining reading resources and writing 
EP's. Students focus on developing and adapting reading material for 
children with various reading problems. 

Prerequisites: SPED 2150, SPED 2522, SPED 3401 

Behavior Management 

SPED 3500 3 cr. 3 hrs. 

This course prepares students to carry out a variety of behavior 
change strategies in educational settings. Emphasis is on the 
development of a positive, problem-solving approach supporting the 
development of constructive learning and social behavior of children. 
Students also develop an awareness of the effect of teacher behavior 
on the behavior of children. Taken in conjunction with the Integrated 
Professional Pre-Practicum/Practicum (IPP). 

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. 

Program Development for Students 
with Severe Disabilities 

SPED 3520 3. cr. 3 hrs. 

This course examines effective instructional strategies for teaching 
students with severe disabilities and includes an overview of specific 
diagnoses and their implications for teaching. Particular attention is 
given to program development and implementation within inclusive 
settings. Taken in conjunction with Student Teaching (Practicum). 

Reading in Special Education 

SPED 3550 3 cr. 3 hrs. 

This course addresses the serious consequences of reading disabilities 
and related disorders, the condition of dyslexia and the historical and 
contemporary theories on what goes wrong in the reading acquisition 
process in children with dyslexia. Assessment of dyslexia and related 
disorders will be analyzed. The course also focuses on general 
principles derived from research on effective techniques for working 
with children with dyslexia and on the application of those 
techniques in specific areas of the language arts: phonological 
awareness, phonics knowledge, automaticity and fluency in word 
reading, reading comprehension, spelling, handwriting and 
composition. It will address the relationship between reading, writing 
and spelling instruction. Taken in conjunction with the Integrated 
Professional Pre- Practicum/ Practicum (IPP). 
Prerequisite: SPED 3440 



Strategies for Secondary Students with Disabilities 

SPED 3575 3 cr. 3 hrs. 

This course will focus on adolescents with disabilities. Students 
examine various instructional strategies to address the learning and 
behavioral challenges typical of adolescent learners with such 
conditions as learning disabilities, behavioral disorders, and mild 
retardation. Students explore instructional methods relating to 
reading, written language, mathematics, study skills and social skills 
for the adolescent with disabilities. Transitions and post secondary 
programming will address the specific needs of secondary-school 
students as they leave the high school environment. For Special 
Education Majors only or by permission of instructor. 

Secondary Programs for Adolescents (14-22) with 
Disabilities 

SPED 3800 3 cr. 3 hrs. 

Students in secondary education certification programs are provided 
with the legal perspective of services to individuals with disabilities. 
Learning problems and needs of various disabilities are addressed. 
Strategies for modifying instruction are a major focus. 

Assessment of Students with Moderate Disabilities 

SPED 4001 3 cr. 3 hrs. 

The course introduces students to the assessment process, describes a 
comprehensive evaluation, and discusses mandatory assessment 
regulations. The topics of descriptive statistics, reliability and validity, 
and norm/criterion-referenced assessments are addressed. Various 
types of assessment are reviewed and discussed. The focus is on 
interpreting test results and using assessment data to write 
Individual Educational Programs. Taken in conjunction with 
Student Teaching (Practicum). 

Prerequisites: SPED 3550. 

The Integrated Professional Pre- 
Practicum/Practicum (IPP) 

This is a twelve-credit preparation block for Licensures in Moderate 
Disabilities, Severe Disabilities, and Elementary Teacher. For the IPP 
Curriculum, all Teacher Candidates take two courses: SPED 3500- 
Behavior Management. Those in the Moderate Disabilities Program 
also take SPED 3550-Reading in Special Education. 

IPP Pre-Practicum/Practicum: Elementary (Gr. 1-6)** 

SPED 3665 3 cr. 3 hrs. 

Candidates spend half the semester, half days in an elementary school 
in classrooms where students with disabilities are integrated or 
included. The Teacher Candidate assists in the design and instruction 
of lessons, adapting when necessary, and does direct teaching. 

IPP Pre-Practicum/Practicum: Moderate Disabilities 
(PreK-8) 

SPED 3675 3 cr. 3 hrs. 

Candidates spend half the semester, half days in the role of a special 

educator teaching children with 

Moderate Disabilities (PreK-8). The Key to Course Offerings 

children are served in resource rooms, q : designates courses in the 

in integrated programs or in inclusive Quantitative Scientific Cluster 

classrooms. In this role students are 1: the Ideas and Events Cluster 

responsible for assisting in assessing B: the Human Behavior Cluster 

children's performance, direct L: the Literature, Language 

teaching and evaluation. „ J™ 1 ,^ Clu , ster 

C Multicultural 

IDIS: Interdisciplinary courses 
Multicultural and interdisciplinary counts also 
fulfill a cluster designation. 

* Asterisk indicates that the course may 
be offered less than once every two years. 

▲ Undergraduate Day School 

• Undergraduate Evening School 

Courses having a more narrow focus than 
those taught on a regular basis or courses 
being taught on an experimental basis can 
be taught as 'Topics" courses. These courses 
will be assigned numbers based on the 
student level for which they are intended — 
first, second, third or fourth year. 



^>»i 



MS 



IPP Pre-Practicum/Practicum: Moderate Disabilities 4 * 
(5-12) 

SPED 3676 3 cr. 3 hrs. 

Candidates spend half the semester, half day in the role of the 
secondary special educator. Teacher candidates assist in the design 
and instruction of lessons, adapting instruction and direct teaching. 

IPP Pre-Practicum/Practicum: Severe Disabilities 

SPED 3765 3 cr. 3 hrs. 

In this field experience, Teacher Candidates assume the role of a 
teacher of students with severe disabilities. Students work with 
individuals on functional academics and on the development of 
appropriate social skills. Participants assist in the development and 
implementation of instructional programs. 

Practicum: Severe Disabilities I (All Levels) 

SPED 3840 6cr. 6 hrs. 

Teacher Candidates complete the practicum in an educational setting 
under the direction of a mentor who is certified in the area of 
licensure sought by the Candidate and under the guidance of the 
college supervisor. Candidates teach students with severe disabilities. 
Taken in conjunction with SPED 3520. 

Practicum: Severe Disabilities II (All Levels) 

SPED 3845 6cr.6hrs. 

Teacher Candidates complete the practicum in a special education 
setting under the 

direction of a mentor who is certified in the area of licensure sought 
by the candidate and under the guidance of the college supervisor. 
Candidates assume the role of the teacher of students with severe 
disabilities. Taken in conjunction with SPED 3520. 

Practicum: Elementary (Gr. 1-6) 

SPED 3860 6cr.6hrs. 

Teacher Candidates complete the practicum in an elementary setting 
under the guidance 

of the college supervisor and under the direction of a mentor who is 
certified in the area of licensure sought by the candidate and under 
the guidance of the college supervisor. Taken in conjunction with 
SPED 4001. 

Practicum: Moderate Disabilities (PreK-8) 

SPED 3870 6cr.6hrs. 

Teacher Candidates complete the practicum in an inclusive or special 
education pre- 

kindergarten to eighth grade setting under the direction of a mentor 
who is certified in the area of licensure sought by the candidate and 
under the guidance of the college supervisor. Taken in conjunction 
with SPED 4001. 

Practicum: Moderate Disabilities (5-12) 

SPED 3875 6cr.6hrs. 

Teacher Candidates complete the practicum in an inclusive setting or 
a special education setting at the middle or high school level under 
the direction of a mentor who is certified in the area of licensure 
sought by the candidate and under the guidance of the college 
supervisor. Taken in conjunction with SPED 4001 . 

Practicum: Moderate Disabilities II (5-12) 

SPED 3878 6 cr. 6 hrs. 

Teacher Candidates complete the practicum in an inclusive setting or 
a special education setting at the middle or high school level under 
the direction of a mentor who is certified in the area of licensure 
sought by the candidate and under the guidance of the college 
supervisor. Taken in conjunction with SPED 4001 . 

Independent Study 

SPED 4900 3 cr. 3 hrs. 

The Independent Study facilitates the review, development, and 
synthesis of a problem in special education The Independent Study is 
open to juniors and seniors with permission of the Instructor. 



Directed Study 

SPED 4975 1-6 cr. 



*jor teacher candidates who elect to apply Jor elementary certification. 



Speech 



Speech improvement 

*SPCH 0100 1 cr. 1 hr. ▲ 

Students are assigned to this remedial course after being evaluated as 
needing speech improvement. Individual and group therapy is used 

introduction to Speech Communication 

SPCH 1000 3cr.3hr. ▲• 

The class focuses on theory and practice of interpersonal and public 
communication, including communication theory, self-concept, 
perception, language, listening, non-verbal communication, and 
public speaking. L 

Argumentation and Debate 

SPCH 1100 3cr.3hr. A 

Students participate in projects that emphasize analysis, research, 
evidence, strategies, briefing, refutation, and the delivery of debates 
on representative questions. L 

Business and Career Communication 

*SPCH 1200 3 cr. 3 hr. ▲ 

Theory and methods of communication are applied to business and 
career problems Emphasis is placed on skills especially important to 
students planning to work for or with an organization. Interviewing, 
group conferences, and staff presentations are emphasized. 

* Effective Speaking for the Electronic Media 

SPCH 1300 3 cr. 3 hr. ▲ 

The class focuses on a variety of speaking experiences encountered 
by those who plan to use electronic media in their occupation. The 
class is particularly suited to students who anticipate speaking roles in 
industry- made productions as well as those who aspire to careers as 
professional broadcasters. L 

Small Group Communication 

SPCH 1400 3cr.3hr. ▲• 

The course explores the fundamentals of group discussion in private 
and public settings. Emphasis is on group structure, leadership, and 
interpersonal relationships, including extensive practice in varied 
group situations. L 

Public Speaking 

SPCH 1600 3cr.3hr. ▲ 

The course fosters the development of skills and strategies 
employed in the preparation and presentation of the public address. 
Students make critical assessments of rhetorical strategies used by 
public figures. L 

Voice and Articulation 

SPCH 1700 3cr.3hr. ▲ 

The course concentrates on the elements of vocal production and 
presentation with special emphasis on the study and application of 
phonetic theory. L 

Intercollegiate Debate and Forensics 

*SPCH 2100 1 cr. 1 hr. ▲ 

The course provides opportunities for study and participation in 
debate and forensic speaking activities. 

Persuasion 

SPCH 2600 3 cr. 3 hr. ▲ 

The course studies the causes of listener belief and action with 
special emphasis on the development of strategies to influence 
listener behavior. L 

Rhetorical Criticism 

*SPCH 2800 3 cr. 3 hr. ▲ 

The class explores approaches to the rhetorical criticism of 
significant speeches and speech movements, past and present. L 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Technical Theater 



Theatrical Design Skills 

TETA 2100 3cr.4hr. A 

A lecture/laboratory course presenting basic problem solving skills 

in scenic and costume craft covering terminology and processes of 

stage production including integration of design elements/materials, 

basic drafting, stage carpentry, rigging, equipment use, and shop 

safety. 

Prerequisites: ITEC 1200, 1300, 1400. 

Fundamentals of Stage Lighting Design 

TETA 2300 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

A lecture/laboratory course dealing with the application of the 

elements of design relating to lighting for the theater and dance. 

Mechanics of basic electricity, color theory, instrumentation , 

distribution, and control. 

Prerequisite: ITEC 1000. 

Scene Design 

TETA 2400 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

A lecture/laboratory study of the historical and contemporary 

contribution of space and environment atmospherics to the creation 

of the world of the play/dance and the theater experience as a whole. 

Rendering, graphic media, specification writing, and scenic models 

are addressed. 

Prerequisites: TETA 2100, ITEC 1000. 

Costume Design 

TETA 2500 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

The history of fashion silhouette is explored along with the design 

elements used in developing a character's costume Students will 

apply historical perspective and utilize the design elements of line, 

texture, color, and gesture in designing costumes. 

Prerequisites: TETA 2100. 

Advanced Stage Lighting Design 

TETA 3300 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

A lecture/laboratory study of the problems of stage lighting for the 
Proscenium and Non-Proscenium stages. Students are expected to 
develop and apply concept and historical lighting techniques in 
various theater and dance genre (musical-comedy, cabaret, modern, 
and jazz dance). Computer applied lighting will be used in a 
production environment. 

Prerequisites: TETA 2300, ITEC 2410. 

Advanced Scene Design 

TETA 3400 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

An advanced course emphasizing approaches and techniques 
relating to the design, development, and implementation of scenic 
concepts. Students will utilize approaches to research design and 
develop scenic concepts. Concepts will be developed, rendered, 
constructed, and rigged to production standards. 

Prerequisites: TETA 2400, ITEC 2410. 

Stage Make-up 

TETA 3600 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

A lecture/laboratory course investigating the principles, techniques, 
and materials of character stage make-up and practical application. 
Students will apply, in a production setting, principles, techniques, 
and materials of character stage make-up. They will identify historical 
justification for period make-up and apply techniques for live 
animation, clowning, and dramatic character. 

Prerequisites: TETA 2400. 

Stage Management 

TETA 4100 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

A lecture/laboratory study of the professional union approach to 
stage management and personnel mediation in stage production. 
Students will apply knowledge and technique related to contract 
and union policy in various repertory scenarios. The aspects of 
prompt books, blocking documentation, call-sheets, rehearsal set-up 
and running and calling the show will be implemented. 

Prerequisites: senior status. 



Portfolio Presentation 

TETA 4200 3 cr. 4 hr. A 

This course will provide the Technical Theatre student with practical 
application for presenting a Professional Portfolio. Practical 
application of common professional practices along with interviewing 
skills will be applied through lectures, demonstrations and projects 
designed to build the student's portfolio and confidence in presenting 
their work to the professional world. 

Theater Internship 

TETA 4950 3cr. A 



Theater 



Stage Movement 

THEA 1700 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This workshop-oriented course utilizes the basic techniques of 
theatrical mime and movement with emphasis on developing each 
student's potential for effective physicalization on stage. 

Introduction to Theater 

THEA 2000 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

This introductory course surveys theater with emphasis on its 
history, focuses, practices, and major practitioners, including 
directors, actors, and scenic designers. The focus is on historical and 
social contexts. L, C 

Children's Theater 

'THEA 2100 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

This introductory course in theater for children explores its 
principles and practices, covering aspects of play production for 
juvenile audiences. Emphasis is on script selection and evaluation, 
directing, acting, and staging techniques. 

Stagecraft and Theater Production 

THEA 2200 3 cr. 3 hr. A 

In a laboratory situation, the student takes one selected play from 
initial sketches through to the finished model and plans for 
production, including design, set building, costuming, lighting, and 
management. 

Acting I 

THEA 2700 3 cr. 3 hr. A • 

In this course the acting fundamentals of stage speech and 
movement, creative mime and improvisation are explored. Plays are 
read and analyzed. Systematic technique building and scene study 
are heavily emphasized. L 



Key to Course Offerings 

Q: designates courses in the 
Quantitative Scientific Cluster 

I: the Ideas and Events Ouster 

B: the Human Behavior Cluster 

L: the Literature, Language 
and Arts Cluster 

G Multicultural 

IDIS: Interdisciplinary courses 

Multicultural and inlmfca'fdimiry courses also 

fulfill a duster designation. 

* Asterisk indicates that the course may 
be offered less than once every two years. 

▲ Undergraduate Day School 

• Undergraduate Evening School 

Courses having a more narrow focus than 
those taught on a regular basis or courses 
being taught on an experimental basis can 
be taught as Topics" courses These courses 
will be assigned numbers based on the 
student level for which they ate intended — 
first, second, third or fourth year. 



Graduate Division 




G. 



raduate Education at Fitchburg State College is 
an exciting and challenging adventure. It offers diverse 
perspectives for part time and full time advanced study 
in a variety of professional and academic fields. 

The Office of Graduate Studies is committed to 
engaging excellence as it promotes learning in every 
aspect of its educational mission — to consistently offer 
its students the affordable high quality evening degree 
programs, courses, and other life-long learning 
opportunities they desire, seek, and need. The 
commitment to cjuality is evidenced in the dedicated 
cadre of faculty who are actively involved in their 
professional and academic fields — who bring their 
focussed expertise and experience to their classrooms, 
laboratories, and studios. 

Fitchburg State College's Office of Graduate Studies 
is proud of the contributions its faculty, graduates, and 
other former students have made, and will continue to 
make, to their chosen fields of endeavor. 



Graduate Faculty 



Fitchburg State College faculty holding terminal degrees are 
eligible for graduate faculty status. Faculty with advanced 
degrees and special recognition in their field are qualified for 
associate graduate faculty status. Experts from other 
universities or the community-at-large may serve, by 
invitation, as visiting lecturers. 

Administration 

The Office of Graduate Studies is administered by the Dean 
of Curriculum and Instruction. 

The Graduate Council consists of five members of the 
graduate faculty (selected by the Fitchburg State College 
Faculty Association), three administrators (appointed by the 
College's President) and a degree seeking graduate student. 
The Graduate Council makes reports and recommendations 
on the following matters: 

The changing of course requirements within an existing 
graduate curricula, the addition of new courses within such 
curricula, and the criteria to be applied in designating, as 
such, members of the graduate faculty The Council shall 
also hear appeals from graduate students to the College's 
graduate program. 

Reports and recommendations made by the Graduate 
Council are transmitted to the President of the college 
through the Academic Vice President, copies are transmitted 



to the college Faculty Association's Chapter President and 
the chairperson of each department that sponsors a graduate 
program. The Graduate Council shall send copies of minutes 
and its agenda to the All College Committee. 

Graduate Program Chair 

Each graduate program has a Graduate Program Chairperson 
who, among other things is responsible for: 

• Quality control of the graduate curriculum. 

• Evaluation of course content and degree program 
relevancy. 

• Developing and maintaining a 2-year plan of course 
offerings. 

• Developing course schedule for yearly offerings (summer, 
fall, winter, spring). 

• Working with the Graduate Council and the Dean of 
Curriculum and Instruction in administration and policy 
matters. 

• Evaluating graduate students each semester and reviewing 
student folders. 

• Recommending and approving courses to be taken by 
matriculated students each semester. 

• Advising and assisting in appropriate policy actions 
needed by graduate students (e.g., acceptance of transfer 
credits, graduation review, etc.). 

• Reviewing applications for admission. 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Professional Education Programs 

The professional education programs at Fitchburg State 
College are under the broad coordination of an Education 
Unit that includes the following licensure and degree 
program areas: Undergraduate and Graduate Teacher 
Preparation Programs, Graduate Guidance Counseling 
Program and Graduate Educational Leadership and 
Management Programs. Effective October 2003, 
Massachusetts teacher licensure requirements changed. 
Professional licensure (formerly standard certification) will 
required 3 years of employment in the role of the license, 
and a one year induction program (working with a mentor 
in the school district.) 

For more detailed information about educational licensure, 
contact the Educator Licensure Office at 978-665-3239 or 
visit the web site at www.jsc.edu/edcert. 



Admissions 



Application Requirements 

To apply for study in the Graduate Program applicants are 
required to submit: 

Graduate Application Checklist 

• Graduate application for admission. 

• Non-refundable application fee: $25 for U.S. citizens or 
permanent residents, $50 for international applicants. Do 
not send cash. Please print applicant's first and last name 
on the check or money order. 

• Official transcript from your baccalaureate degree 
granting college/university The transcript must indicate 
degree received and date of graduation. The transcript 
must be sent directly from the institution to the Graduate 
Admissions Office. (Applicants to CAGS programs are 
not required to submit a transcript from the baccalaureate 
degree granting college/university but must submit a 
transcript from the master's degree granting institution. 
See below.) 

• Official transcripts from all graduate programs from 
which you are requesting transfer credit and, if applicable, 
all institutions from which you have received graduate 
degrees. Transcripts must be sent directly from the 
institution to the Graduate Admissions Office. If you are 
applying to a CAGS program, you must submit an official 
transcript from your master's degree granting institution 
listing degree received and date of graduation. 

• Standardized Test Scores. All master's degree programs 
require the official results from one of the three following 
tests: the Graduate Management Admissions Test 
(GMAT), the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or the 
Miller's Analogies Test (MAT). Please refer to list below 
for the appropriate test. Test scores are not required for 
applicants to certificate or CAGS programs. 

• GMAT is required for all applicants to the MBA program. 

• GRE is required for all applicants to the MA or MAT in 
Biology, MEd in Science Education, 

and MS in Computer Science. 



• GRE or MAT is required for all applicants to MA or MAT 
in English or History, all MEd programs (except Science 
Education), and MS in Applied Communication, 
Counseling, 

Criminal Justice, and Nursing. 

• Three letters of recommendation from individuals under 
whom the applicant has studied or under whose 
supervision he/she has worked in a professional capacity. 
Please use the Letter oj Recommendation forms provided 
herein or submit the narrative portion of the 
recommendation on institutional letterhead. All letters of 
recommendation must be mailed by the author directly to 
the Graduate Admissions Office. 

• A professional resume. 

• A personal statement. Required ONLY for applicants to 
certificate programs in Adolescent and Family Therapy, 
Child Protective Services, Forensic Nursing, and 
Substance Abuse Services, MEd in Arts Education, and 
MS in Counseling and Nursing. 

• A writing sample. Required ONLY for applicants to the 
MA in History. 

• A copy of current U.S. RN License for applicants to the 
MS or Certificate in Nursing. 

IMPORTANT: Additional requirements for applicants to 
Teacher Preparation, MAT, MEd, and CAGS in Education 
programs, as well as the MS in School Guidance 
Counseling programs. (If you are applying to a degree 
program that does not lead to a Massachusetts Teaching 
License, such as the MEd in General Studies or Secondary 
Education, you are not required to submit the two items 
listed below.) 

• Passing scores for the Communications and Literacy 
subtests of the Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure 
(MTEL) are required for all applicants to graduate and 
certificate programs leading to initial licensure to teach in 
the state of Massachusetts. MTEL Communications and 
Literacy results are also required of all applicants to the 
CAGS Educational Leadership and Management: School 
Principal or Supervisor/Director. Note: Subject area 
MTEL test(s) must be completed prior to student 
teaching. 

• Copy of initial teaching license for applicants to programs 
leading to professional licensure. (If you have a valid 
initial teaching license from Massachusetts, you do not 
need to submit the Communications and Literacy subtest 
scores referred to above.) 

The application, fee, and other requested materials should 
be sent to: 

Office of Graduate Admissions 
Fitchburg State College 
1 60 Pearl Street 
Fitchburg, MA 01420-2697 

Additional Application Requirements for 
International Students 

Non U.S. citizens who do not possess a permanent visa with 
an Alien Registration number must submit the paperwork 
listed below in order to be considered for admission to 
Fitchburg State College. Students on F- 1 or J- 1 visas must 
study on a full-time basis and are not eligible for state or 
federal financial aid. 



••.i" 






International Applicants 

In addition to requirements listed above, applicants with 
international credentials must submit the following: 

• Supplemental Application for Admission/Certificate of 
Finances (Available at www.fsc.edu/intled.) 

• Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). This test 
is required of all international applicants with the 
exception of those who have earned a high school, 
associate's, bachelor's, or master's degree from an 
institution in the United States OR applicants from Great 
Britain, Ireland, Australia, or Canada. The minimum 
passing test score is 550 (paper-based test) and 213 
(computer-based test). Official score results must be sent 
from the testing agency to the Graduate Admissions 
Office and must be dated within the past five years. For 
more information about the TOEFL test please visit http./ 
/www. toefl. org 

• Transcripts 

• The school accepts only official transcripts that are 
signed and stamped. 

(// the seal on the envelope is not intact, the transcript will NOT be 
accepted) 

• All international students must have their foreign 
transcripts evaluated. 

{For evaluation of your transcripts, go to the Center for Educational 

Documentation website-. 

http://www.cedevaluations.com) 

• If your transcripts are not in English, they must be 
translated. 

(If you need to translate your transcripts to English, please go to the 
International Documentation Center website: 
http:/ 'www. eurasiacom.com) 

• F- 1 and J- 1 applicants only. If you plan to study at 
Fitchburg State College under an F-l or J-l visa status you 
must submit the appropriate financial documentation with 
your application for admission. Please refer to our web 
site at www.fsc.edu/intled for more details. 

• Supplemental Application for Admission/Certificate of 
Finances. 

(Available at www.fsc.edu/intled.) 

• Financial Verification Forms. Please visit www.fsc.edu/ 
intled for more details. 

• Photocopies of all previous I-20s (front and back). 

• Photocopies of your passport and visa, if you are currently 
in the United States. 

• Photocopy of 1-94 form (front and back), if you are 
currently in the United States. 

• If the student is transferring from another university or 
college in the United States, a Transfer Recommendation 
form must be completed. This form may be requested 
from the International Education Office. 

Deadlines 

Completed applications are reviewed on a rolling admission 
basis. On average, admission decisions are mailed four to six 
weeks after an application file becomes complete. 
Applicants who are accepted to a program after the add/ 
drop period (traditionally, two weeks after the start of the 
semester) will be accepted for the subsequent semester. 



EXCEPTION: International applicants MUST complete 
their applications by the deadlines listed below. 
The Graduate Admissions Office cannot guarantee that 
students completing applications after the published 
deadline will receive an admission decision in time to 
process visa requests. Accordingly, late applications may be 
deferred a semester at the discretion of the Admissions 
Office. 

• Fall Semester Deadline: August 15 

• Spring Semester Deadline: January 1 

Admissions Procedures 

Once all application materials have been received by the 
Admissions Office, the appropriate Departmental committee 
reviews an applicant's qualifications and makes a 
recommendation. The admission process is completed when 
the Dean concurs with the program's decision and approves 
or denies the applicant's admission. While admission 
decisions are prompted by a completed application, the 
admissions process and its outcome are based on academic 
department criteria. 

Transfer of Credit 

The Graduate Office accepts a maximum of six (6) semester 
hours in transfer credits from regionally accredited graduate 
schools. Transfer credit requests are acted upon as part of 
the admission process when a student submits the Request 
For Transfer of Graduate Credit Form, official transcripts 
from the appropriate institution and has been accepted into 
the Graduate Program. Transferred courses are not included 
in the cumulative GPA. No requests for transfer credits are 
accepted during the Spring Semester prior to a student's 
anticipated graduation. 

The transfer of credits must be approved by the Program 
Chairperson and by the Dean and meet the following 
criteria: 

• A grade of B (3.0) or better,- pass/fail grades are not 
transferrable 

• Courses accepted in transfer must carry graduate level 
credit 

• Courses must be relevant to degree specialization 

• Transferred courses are only valid if taken within six years 
of the date of graduation from a matriculant's graduate 
program 

• Courses previously counted toward a graduate degree or 
CACS from Fitchburg State College or another accredited 
institution do not qualify for transfer towards a Fitchburg 
State College Master's or CAGS Program 

Courses Taken Prior To Admission 

Twelve (12) semester hours of Fitchburg State College 
credit taken within a year prior to the student's admission 
may be applied to the degree program with the approval of 
the Program Chairperson. No more than six (6) semester 
hours of course work at the 6000 level may be applied 
toward a degree program. 

Residency Requirement 

Students acquiring credit towards a Master's degree off- 
campus in affiliated programs must take at least 6 credits of 
core course requirements from Fitchburg State College 
Residency Faculty. 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Fitchburg State College Residency Faculty are: 

• Graduate Faculty 

• Associate Graduate Faculty or, 

• Adjunct Graduate Faculty designated "Residency Faculty" 
by the Graduate Council. 

Graduate Program Chairs overseeing affiliated programs are 
responsible for ensuring that their students are provided the 
opportunity to meet the residency requirement by staffing 
appropriate core courses with Residency Faculty. 



Academic Policies 
and Procedures 



Advisors and Plan of Study 

Graduate Advisors 

Every student is assigned an advisor from the student's area 
of specialization. The advisor: 

• Provides a vital link between the students, faculty, and the 
Dean 

• Assists the degree candidate in developing a plan of study 

• Approves all courses, including electives, accepted in the 
student's degree programs 

All variances from the approved plan of study must be filed 
with the Registrar's Office. Plan of study forms are available 
in the Graduate Office or Registrar's Office. 

Course Registration 

Students must register for courses within the curriculum 
requirements as set in the College Catalog of the year of 
their matriculation. However, it is the right of the College to 
alter the requirements to meet statutory, educational, or 
professional standards. 

For regularly scheduled courses, students must register 
before the second class meeting. Early registration is 
recommended for all degree seeking graduate students and 
graduate applicants in order to secure seats in the courses 
needed to proceed in degree programs. The regular 
registration period ends two weeks prior to the start of the 
semester, with "late registration" and late charges 
commencing thereafter. Please refer to the current semester 
course bulletin for specific dates. 

Student Health Insurance 

Every graduate student registered for 6.75 or more credits is 
required by law to purchase health insurance. Students must 
purchase the school sponsored health plan or show proof of 
comparable coverage in an alternate health plan in order to 
enroll. For more details, see Student Health Services section 
in this catalog. 

Special Students 

A special student holds a baccalaureate degree or higher and 
may take classes in most graduate or certificate programs, 
but is not matriculated as a degree candidate. Additional 
policies applying to special students are as follows: 

• Special Students are allowed to register for a maximum of 
12 credits in one discipline. 



• To register for courses beyond 6 semester hours Special 
Students must matriculate or obtain written approval from 
the appropriate graduate program chair. 

• Graduate courses at the 6000 level are exempt from this 
policy. 

• Credit from courses may apply to a degree only if 
prerequisites for the program are met, the student is 
matriculated, and approval is received from the Program 
chair or advisor. 

Waiver of Course Prerequisites 

Waivers of course prerequisites, when authorized, are not to 
be construed either as waivers of program matriculation 
requirements or as waivers of credit hours required to 
complete a program. 

Retention in a Graduate Degree Program 

To maintain enrollment in a graduate program, students must: 

• Earn a 2.8 average in undergraduate prerequisite course 
work as designated by individual graduate programs. 
Students must earn a 2.0 in all other undergraduate 
prerequisite course work outside of their major. 
Undergraduate prerequisite courses must be finished 
before graduate coursework can begin. 

• Maintain a cumulative average of 3.0 in graduate 
coursework counted toward the degree or certificate. 

• Adhere to the ethical/professional standards as defined by 
the profession and/or the academic department. 

Probation and Academic Dismissal 

• A student will be placed on probation if in any semester 
the student's graduate GPA falls between a 3.0 and a 2.75 
cumulative average. 

A student will be dismissed from the program: 

• If the graduate cumulative average falls below 2.75. 

• If the graduate cumulative average of a student on 
probation remains between 3.0 and 2.75 for two 
consecutive enrollment periods. 

• If the student has accumulated more than 6 semester 
hours of graduate credit with a grade of 2.0 even though 
the graduate cumulative average remains 2.75 or higher. 

• If the student has received a grade of 0.0. 

• If the student's cumulative average in designated 
undergraduate prerequisite coursework falls below 2.8. 

• If the student's cumulative average in undesignated 
undergraduate prerequisite coursework falls below 2.0. 

Course Load 

Graduate students must register for a minimum of 9 credit 
hours in fall/spring to be considered full-time. Course load 
for part-time status is less than 9 credit hours, half-time 
status is 5 credit hours. 

Graduate Assistants who work 20 hours per week and are 
registered for at least 6 credit hours are considered to have 
full-time status. Students who are registered for at least 6 
credits in Thesis, Continuation of Thesis, or Internship/ 
Practicum are also considered to have full-time status. 




■ 



The maximum course load for any graduate student is 12 
credit hours in fall, spring or the combined summer I/II 
sessions. Six credit hours maximum may be taken in the 
winter session. Students who want to register for credit 
beyond the normal load must have written approval from 
the Dean of Curriculum and Instruction prior to registering. 
Forms are available from the Office of Graduate and 
Continuing Education or from the academic advisors. 

Continued Progress Toward Degree 

Matriculated students who do not register for classes for a 
full academic year (fall, spring, and summer) must request a 
leave of absence by writing to the Dean of Curriculum and 
Instruction. Without an approved request, a student is 
dismissed from the degree program. 

Readmission to Degree Program 

A student who has been dismissed from a program because 
of failure to request a leave of absence may reapply to the 
program. 

A student who has been dismissed from a program for 
academic reasons may not register for further courses in that 
program at Fitchburg State College. After a minimum time 
period of one year, a student may apply to Fitchburg State 
College for readmission. 

Readmission is contingent on the capability of the student 
to maintain at least a 3.0 GPA and on evidence that there 
are sufficient courses remaining in the student's program to 
achieve a 3.0. GPA. 

Students seeking readmission to a program must reapply by 
completing a Request for Curriculum Modification or 
Waiver of Academic Regulation Form. For those seeking 
readmission into a different degree program, the admissions 
process must be completed after permission from the Dean 
is secured. 

The program/policies in effect at the time of readmission are 
those that the student must follow. 

Grade Substitution Policy 

Students who have been dismissed from a graduate program 
on academic grounds and who are subsequently readmitted 
to a program may retake courses in which they have 
received a 2.0 or a 0.0 grade. If the class is repeated, the new 
grade will be substituted for the original grade in calculating 
the student's cumulative GPA. The original grade, however, 
will continue to appear on the transcript. Transfer courses 
cannot be used to substitute for courses in which a grade of 
2.0 or a 0.0 has been obtained. 

Grading System 

4.0 Superior 

3.0 or 3.5 Good 

2.0 or 2.5 Passing 

Failure 

W Withdrew 

IN Incomplete 

IP In- Progress 



Incomplete Course 

An incomplete (IN) may be awarded with the 
recommendation of the instructor when the student has 
completed 80% of the coursework but cannot complete the 
rest due to illness or some other serious reason. The student 
must file a petition for an incomplete with the instructor 
prior to the last day of class. A student who has received an 
Incomplete in lieu of a course grade must make up the 
missing part or his/her coursework during the first four 
weeks of the following semester. Failure to do so will result 
in an automatic 0.0 for the course. 

In-Progress Course 

A grade of IP (In-Progress) may be awarded for thesis, 
practicum, internships, and clinical experience at the end of 
a given semester. Practicums and internships need to be 
completed within two semesters. The time limit for thesis is 
the six years allowed for the completion of a degree. If the 
thesis, internship and/or practicum are not completed within 
the allotted time then the IP grade will be changed to either 
an incomplete (IN) or a grade of 0.0. 

Withdrawal from Courses 

Withdrawal from courses may be made prior to the eleventh 
class for regularly scheduled courses and prior to the twenty- 
sixth class hour for special scheduling or institute courses 
without academic penalty. Withdrawals may be initiated by 
phone by calling the Registrar's Office, or by visiting that 
office in the Sanders Administration Building. In either case, 
the student, the instructor, and the advisor must receive a 
confirming copy of the completed course withdrawal form. 

Students who "withdraw" by simply not attending class, 
automatically receive a failing grade for the course. 

See tuition and fees refund policy in "Tuition and Fees" 
catalog section. 

Cancellation of Course 

The college may cancel courses for insufficient enrollment 
or for other reasons deemed to be in the best interest of the 
college. Students who registered for a course which is 
canceled may transfer to another course or receive a full 
refund of tuition and fees. 

Course Changes 

Changes to courses (drop/add) must be made by the second 
meeting. (Class meeting time defined as 2.5 hours) No 
change in credit is permitted after the second class meeting. 
After the start of the second class meeting, the dropping of a 
class will be considered a withdrawal. 

Audit 

Students may enroll in courses on an audit (or non-credit) 
basis. The availability of seating in all classes is determined 
after all degree seeking students, program applicants and 
credit-seeking students have registered. Permission of the 
instructor and the Dean is required prior to registration. 
Tuition and fees for audited courses are the same as those 
which apply to the courses when taken for academic credit. 
Students enrolled on an audit basis must have completed all 
applicable course prerequisites in order to have achieved the 
sufficient level of knowledge and expertise required by the 
course content. Students who elect the audit option may be 
required to complete course assignments, papers, 
presentations, etc. Final grades are not issued, however, 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



courses audited will be so noted on the student's transcript. 
A change from credit to audit status, or from audit to credit 
status, must be made by the second class meeting of the 
course (Class meeting is defined as 2.5 hours). 

Independent Study Credit Policy 

Independent study allows degree candidates to step outside 
of course offerings and explore a specialized area of study in 
a challenging new environment. Students are encouraged to 
seek out independent study opportunities under the 
guidance and supervision of a professor in whose 
specialization they wish to study. A maximum of six 
independent study credits is allowed in a master's degree 
program. Vouchers, graduate assistant tuition waivers, 
tuition remissions, and veterans' tuition benefits may not be 
applied to independent study. Before embarking on an 
independent study applicants must receive approval from 
the instructor, advisor, and the Dean of Curriculum and 
Instruction. Only on-campus faculty supervises independent 
studies. Independent study should not be substituted for any 
course listed in the current catalog. 

Directed Study 

Directed study allows a student to carry out a non-research 
project or participate in an activity under the direct 
supervision of a faculty member. In exceptional 
circumstances, it can be used to offer an existing course to 
an individual student. All directed studies require approval of 
faculty sponsor, advisor, Program Chair and Dean of 
Curriculum and Instruction. 

Thesis 

Several of the graduate programs at Fitchburg State College 
include a thesis requirement or thesis option. Students 
completing a thesis must adhere to the policies and 
standards set forth in the thesis guidelines. Thesis guidelines 
can be obtained through the Office of Graduate Studies or 
the student's academic department. 

Second Master's Degree 

Students holding a Master's degree from Fitchburg State 
College are generally not encouraged to enroll in a second 
Master's degree program but may want to consider a 
Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study (CAGS) program. 
To matriculate in a second Master's degree program the 
student must petition the Dean of Curriculum and 
Instruction for approval. After securing approval to apply, 
the student must complete the Admission process. 

Graduation Requirements 

Students must: 

• Maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 in the degree 
program with no graduate coursework below a 2.0 

• Successfully complete all program requirements 

• Submit completed petitions/waivers for review to the 
Office of Graduate Studies no later than the eighth week 
of the spring semester prior to anticipated graduation 

• Students who are writing a thesis should refer to the 
Thesis guidelines for specific requirements 

• File an application for graduation with the Registrar's 
Office by January 1 st of the year of anticipated graduation 



Time Limits 

Graduate degree programs must be completed within six 
years of the date of the student's first course in the program. 

Petition for Review 

Students must request a review of their folder prior to the 
semester in which they will complete requirements for the 
degree. Application for Graduation Forms must be submitted 
to the Registrar's Office prior to January 1 to qualify for May 
graduation. Obtain forms from the Graduate Office, the 
Registrar's Office or at http://www.jsc.edu/registrar/regconf.html. 

Academic Dishonesty Policy 

Academic dishonesty in all its forms, including cheating, 
fabrication, plagiarism, and the facilitating of academic 
dishonesty by aiding and abetting any of the 
aforementioned is not tolerated at Fitchburg State College. 
Violators will be subject to the college's Academic Affairs 
established judicial process. 

Student Complaints Policy 

Right to Confer 

• A student who is dissatisfied with a grade or any aspect of 
instruction has a right to confer with the instructor. 

• A student who is dissatisfied with a grade, any aspect of 
instruction, or academic decision of a graduate program 
bearing on her or his status in a graduate program, has a 
right to confer with her or his advisor. 

• A student who is dissatisfied with a grade, any aspect of 
instruction, or academic decision of a graduate program 
bearing on her or his status in a graduate program, has a 
right to confer with the program's Graduate Program 
Chair and Department Chair. 

• A student seeking advice on how to proceed with a 
complaint about a grade, any aspect of instruction, or 
academic decision of a graduate program bearing on her 
or his status in a graduate program, has a right to confer 
with the Dean of Curriculum and Instruction. 
International students also have a right to confer with the 
Office of International Education. 

Department/Program Responsibilities 

• Departments/Programs will make their policies and 
procedures for mediating/arbitrating student complaints 
readily available to students as a part of a Department/ 
Program handbook, or, as a separate document. 

• Entering matriculated students will be apprised of the 
Department's/Program's policies and procedures for 
mediating/arbitrating student complaints as a part of their 
orientation to the program. 

• Each Department/Program will file its policies and 
procedures for mediating/arbitrating student complaints 
with the Office of the Dean of Curriculum and 
Instruction. 

• Every effort should be made by the Graduate Program 
Chair, in accordance with Department/Program policies 
and procedures, to informally mediate student complaints 
concerning academic matters. 






• If informal mediation cannot be achieved, the complaint 
will be formally arbitrated at the Department/Program 
level in accordance with its policies and procedures for 
doing so. Usually, this will involve the participation of the 
Department's Graduate Committee. 

• The burden of proof rests with the student. 

• Departmental/Program decisions may be appealed on 
procedural grounds when bias is alleged. 

Dean of Education or Dean of Curriculum and 
Instruction Responsibilities 

• A student alleging bias may contest a Department's/ 
Program's decision on procedural grounds by filing a 
formal appeal in writing to the Dean of Education or 
Dean of Curriculum and Instruction. 

• In a timely manner, the Office of the Dean will conduct 
an investigation and will forward its findings, and the 
student's written appeal, to the Graduate Council. 

• The Graduate Council will consider the appeal at its next 
available meeting. 

• Within two weeks of the meeting, the Chair of the 
Graduate Council will forward a written recommendation 
to the Dean. 

• The Dean, then, will communicate a decision in writing to 
the student, the Graduate Council, and the Graduate 
Program Chair. 

• The final decision is made by the Dean. 

• If it is decided that the Department/Program failed to 
appropriately follow its procedures for mediating/ 
arbitrating student complaints, the case will be reheard 
within the Department with the Dean serving ex officio as a 
non-voting member of the committee. 

• If it is decided that the Department/Program was 
unbiased — that it appropriately followed its procedures 
for mediating/arbitrating student complaints — the 
Department's/Program's decision will stand. 

Non-Academic Student Complaints 

• When sexual harassment, racial discrimination or other 
prohibited/illegal behaviors are alleged by a student to 
have occurred, the student should address her or his 
complaint to the Director of Human Resources/ 
Affirmative Action. 

Educator Licensure Programs 

The Fitchburg State College Graduate Division offers 
courses which may be used for licensure purposes in several 
different areas, including Early Childhood, Elementary, 
Middle School, Secondary, Special Education, Counseling, 
and School Administration. Licensure is the function of the 
Commonwealth's Department of Education not the college. 

Please contact the Educator Licensure Office for 
information on teacher licensure programs at 978-665-3239. 
Students are advised to address any question regarding 
licensure to: 

Massachusetts Department of Education 

350 Main Street 

Maiden, Massachusetts 02148-5023 

781-338-3000 

www.doe.mass.edu 



Transcripts 

Unofficial transcripts are available to students on-line. 
Official transcripts may also be requested on-line. Each 
student receives one official transcript free of charge. For 
each additional transcript, there's a $5.00 fee. For more 
information, see www.jsc.edu/registrar/ 

To obtain a transcript write to: 

Office of the Registrar 
Fitchburg State College 
1 60 Pearl Street 
Fitchburg, MA 01420-2697 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Graduate Programs 



Fitchburg State's Office of Graduate and Continuing Education schedules both undergraduate and graduate -level courses. 
Most programs are offered in the evenings,- some may be offered on weekends or during the days in summer or winter session. 
The Office of Craduate Studies offers programs of study leading to the following Graduate degrees: 



•<U 



Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study 
(CAGS) 

Educational Leadership and Management: School 

Principal 

(Initial Licensure) 

Educational Leadership and Management: Supervisor/ 

Director 

(Initial Licensure) 

Educational Leadership and Management 
(Non-Licensure) 

Educational Leadership and Management: Technology 
Leader (Non-Licensure) 

Interdisciplinary Studies 

Teacher Leadership (Currently not accepting new 
students) 

Masters Degrees 

Master of Arts 

MA Biology 

MA English 
MA History 

Master of Arts in Teaching 

MAT in Biology (Professional Licensure) 

MAT in Earth Science (Currently not accepting new 
students) 

MAT in English (Professional Licensure) 

MAT in History (Professional Licensure) 

MAT in Mathematics (Currently not accepting new 
students) 

Master of Business Administration 

MBA in Accounting 

MBA in Human Resource Management 

MBA in Management 



Master of Education 

MEd in Arts Education (Non-Licensure) 

MEd in Early Childhood Education (Initial Licensure) 

MEd in Early Childhood Education (Professional 
Licensure) 

MEd in Educational Leadership and Management: School 
Principal (Initial Licensure) 

MEd in Educational Leadership and Management: 
Supervisor/Director (Initial Licensure) 

MEd in Educational Leadership and Management 
(Non-Licensure) 

MEd in Educational Leadership and Management: 
Technology Leader (Non-Licensure) 

MEd in Elementary Education (Initial Licensure) 

MEd in Elementary Education (Professional Licensure) 

MEd in General Studies in Education (Non-Licensure) 

MEd in Middle School Education (Initial Licensure) 

MEd in Middle School Education (Professional 
Licensure) 

MEd in Occupational Education (Non-Licensure) 

MEd in Science Education (Non-Licensure) 

MEd in Science Education (Professional Licensure) 

MEd in Secondary Education (Non-Licensure) 

MEd in Technology Education (Non-Licensure) 

MEd in Technology Education (Professional Licensure) 

MEd in Special Education: Guided Studies 
(Non-Licensure) 

MEd in Special Education: Guided Studies 
(Professional Licensure) 

MEd in Special Education: Reading Specialist 
(Initial Licensure) 

MEd in Special Education: Teacher of Students with 
Moderate Disabilities PreK-8 (Initial Licensure) 

MEd in Special Education: Teacher of Students with 
Moderate Disabilities 5—12 (Initial Licensure) 

MEd in Special Education: Teacher of Students with 
Severe Disabilities (Initial Licensure) 



Master of Science 

MS in Applied Communication: Applied 
Communication 

MS in Applied Communication: Media Technology 

MS in Applied Communication: Library Media 

MS in Applied Communication: Technical and 
Professional Writing 

MS in Computer Science 

MS in Counseling: Marriage and Family Therapy 

MS in Counseling: Mental Health Counseling 

MS in Counseling: School Counseling — Elementary 
(Initial Licensure) 

MS in Counseling: School Counseling — Secondary 
(Initial Licensure) 

MS in Criminal Justice (IMPORTANT This program is 
not accepting applications until Fall 2005) 

MS in Nursing (Forensic) 



Graduate Level Certificate Programs 

Adolescent and Family Therapy 

Applied Communication 

Child Protective Services 

Early Intervention (Currently not accepting new 
students) 

Educational Technology 

Fine Arts Director 

Forensic Casework (Currently not accepting new 
students) 

Forensic Nursing 

School to Career Specialist (Currently not accepting new 
students) 

Substance Abuse Services 

Post-Baccalaureate Certificates 

Biology (Initial Licensure, 8-12) 
English (Initial Licensure, 8-12) 
History (Initial Licensure, 8-12) 
Math (Initial Licensure, 8-12) 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study (CAGS) 



General Philosophy 

Fitchburg State College's CAGS programs are designed to 
meet well-defined career needs of professionals who have 
earned an appropriate Master's degree and who wish to 
attain greater competency in a combination of areas of study 
within one of the major CACS fields offered. 

General Description of Program 

Each student's CACS program is planned under the 
direction of an advisor and is built on the academic 
background, professional position, and career goals of the 
student. CACS programs consist of an integrated core 
curriculum, supervised professional practice, an Internship, 
and elective courses. 

General Program of Study 

Upon acceptance into the program, the student's plan of 
study is developed with and approved by an advisor, who 
works with the student over the course of study. A minimum 
of thirty approved graduate credits is required to complete 
the CACS with the following restrictions: 

• CACS courses may not repeat work previously 
accomplished by the student in other graduate degree 
study 

• CAGS credits must be earned in Graduate-level courses 

Details regarding the CAGS curricula, including information 
about required and elective courses, may be found in the 
specific CAGS program descriptions which follow. 

CAGS-lnterdisciplinary 
Studies 

Graduate Program Chair 

Harry Semerjian, EdD 

Graduate Committee 

Ronald P. Colbert, EdD 
Rosemarie Giovino, EdD 
Anita Hotchkiss, PhD 
Bonnie House, MFA 
Nancy Kelly, PhD 



Nadimpalli Mahadev, PhD 
Edward Martens, PhD 
Donald Schmidt, PhD 
Esmail Valanejad, PhD 
Susan Williams, PhD 



Program Objectives 

The CAGS Program in Interdisciplinary Studies provides the 
opportunity for students who have completed a Master's 
degree to continue advanced degree study in two disciplines 
of their choice. 

Program Description 

The program allows participants to step out of the confines 
of their Master's degree and create a program of study based 
on their interests. This CAGS program invites the student to 
develop his/her ideas and hypotheses and to acquire new 
understanding and knowledge in such areas as developing 
critical thinking skills, improving interpersonal relationships, 



and employing reflection for intellectual growth. By 
broadening the individual's background the candidate 
becomes an effective leader, who has the knowledge and 
skills to influence institutional reform. 

Admissions Standards and Criteria 

To apply for enrollment in the CACS in Interdisciplinary 
Studies, a student must submit documents as outlined in the 
Craduate Admissions section as well as: 

• Official transcript of a Master's degree from a regionally 
accredited institution 

• MAT/GRE/GMAT exams not required 

Program Requirements 

Each student's CAGS program is planned and approved 
under the direction of an advisor and faculty member/ 
professional from both disciplines chosen by the student. 
The CACS consists of an integrated core curriculum, 
supervised professional practice, and/or an Internship and 
elective courses. 

The integrated core curriculum consists of: 

• Fifteen advanced graduate credits in two declared 
disciplines 

• A graduate Internship demonstrating specified 
competencies in the two fields or graduate thesis related 
to the same 

• A structured seminar taken while writing thesis or 
completing Internship 

The student must complete 36 semester hours, which 

includes 

6 semester hours of core course work and 1 5 semester hours 

in each of the two academic disciplines. 

At the end of formal academic study, the student shall 
submit a proposal regarding the graduate thesis or 
Internship. The committee then meets to review the 
proposal and its criteria for evaluation implementation. 

Potential Combined Fields of Study 

Arts, Computer Science, Education, Educational Leadership, 
English, History, Occupational Education, Professional Staff 
Development, Psychology, Science, Special Education, and/ 
or Women's Studies* 

• Students are not limited to the field of study listed above. 

Program of Study 

Required Core Curriculum 

Fifteen advanced graduate credits 

in each declared discipline 30 S.H. 

ID1S 9400 Internship in Interdisciplinary Studies or 6 S.H. 

IDIS 9500 Graduate Thesis 6 S.H. 

Total for Certificate 36 S.H. 



■ 



CAGS-Educational Leadership 
and Management: School 
Principal or Supervisor/ 
Director 

Graduate Program Chair 

Michele Zide, EdD 

Graduate Committee 

Charles Conroy, EdD 
David Harm, PhD 
John Mara, CAGS 
Daniel Nomishan, EdD 

Program Objectives 

The CAGS in Educational Leadership and Management 
Program prepares the student to meet the standards of 
Massachusetts Educator Initial Licensure as a Supervisor/ 
Director (P- 12) or School Principal (P-6, 5-8,9-12). 

About the Program 

The CAGS Program is an interdepartmental program. 
Within this spirit, relationships between faculty members in 
education departments and other programs across the 
college have been allied. 

Program Description 

The CAGS program in Educational Leadership and 
Management is designed for students with the desire to: 

• Develop competencies in managerial skills related to 
political arenas, personnel, fiscal affairs, acquisition of 
material resources, diverse publics and pupil populations, 
and organizational change 

• Strengthen, deepen, and expand the knowledge base in 
the field of leadership and management in order to 
anticipate and to solve problems inherent in the 
educational system 

• Demonstrate through course work and field-based 
experiences the knowledge, skills, and attitudes that are 
required to lead and manage an educational enterprise 
effectively and efficiently 

The Program offers preparation for two 
Massachusetts Educator Licenses 

Principal Licensure (P-6, 5-8, 9-12) 
Supervisor/Director-Licensure (P-12) 

There are two initial licensure options in this program. 
There is one option for students who wish to seek school 
principal licensure and a second option for students who 
wish to supervise or direct Art and/or Music programs in 
school systems. Successful completion of the degree and all 
requisite licensure requirements qualifies degree recipients 
for endorsement as a principal or supervisor/director. 



Non-Licensure Candidates 

Students who do not wish to pursue licensure plan a 
program of study that includes courses from each of the four 
competency areas and develop a thirty-nine semester hour 
program that meets their professional and personal goals. 
Such a program should be planned with and approved by 
the student's advisor. Applicants to the non-licensure track 
do not need to submit scores from the Massachusetts Tests 
for Educator Licensure (MTEL). 

Admissions Standards and Criteria 

To apply for enrollment in the CAGS in Educational 
Leadership and Management program, candidates must 
submit documents as outlined in the Graduate Admission 
section as well as: 

• Official transcript of a Master's degree from a regionally 
accredited institution 

• Documentation of a minimum of three years teaching 
experience 

• MAT/GRE/GMAT exams are not required 

• Applicants must provide documentation of a valid teacher 
certification/license at the initial level. 

• Applicants to Option A and B must successfully complete 
the literacy and communication subtests of the 
Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure (MTEL) and 
submit passing scores as part of their application. 

For more information regarding licensure requirements for 
teacher preparation programs, contact the Teacher 
Certification Office at 978-665-3239 or visit their web 
site at www.jsc.edu/edcert. 

Program Requirements 

A minimum of 39 graduate credits is required to complete 
the CAGS program. Students plan a program of study with 
their advisor that is based on professional interests and 
intent. The program includes courses from each of the four 
competency areas. The courses in these areas are multi- 
disciplined and cross departmental lines. In addition a 
supervised practicum and internship is required. 
During the practicum/internship, the student becomes 
involved in a field-based educational administrative 
experience. Requirements include: 

• Practicum is 300 clock hours within one year, 

• Internship is 300 clock hours within one year,- 

• Students seeking professional licensure may complete a 
400 clock hour clinical experience, 

• Optional thesis (EDLM 9500): A thesis topic is chosen in 
consultation with the student's advisor early in the last 
year of study, or not later than the completion of 24 
semester hours of study. A student must successfully 
defend his/her thesis to a committee as described in the 
handbook of thesis guidelines, 

• Comprehensive Exam covering the basic principles and 
concepts inherent in the field of educational leadership 
and management,- 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Program of Study 



Core Courses 

EDLM 8005 Foundations oj Educational Administration 
EDLM 8050 Seminar: Research in Educational 

Leadership or 
EDLM 9 no/ Practicum and Internship in 
9220 Leadership and Management 
EDLM 9600 The Contemporary Educational Leader 

(Capstone) 

Subtotal oj core courses 
Non-Licensure Candidates plan a program of study 
including courses from each competency area. 



3S.H. 



6S.H. 

3 S.H. 
12 S.H. 



EDLM 


7010 


EDLM 


7040 


EDLM 


8000 


EDLM 


8020 


EDLM 


8030 


EDLM 


9015 


MGMT 


9320 



Competency Areas 

Political and Fiscal Affairs 

EDLM 7005 Politics oj Education 3 S.H. 

Physical Plants and Transportation 3 S.H. 

Collective Bargaining in Education 3 S.H. 

Community Relations 3 S.H. 

Law jor the Educator 3 S.H. 

Public School Finance 3 S.H. 

Public Relations Tools jor Leaders 3 S.H. 

Labor Management 3 S.H. 

Collegial Leadership and Consultation 

EDLM 7020 Organizational Theory and 

Educational Planning 3 S.H. 

Introduction to Systems Approaches 

in Education 3 S.H. 

Principles oj Success jor Practicing 

Administrators: Putting Plans into Action 3 S.H. 

Human Resources and Personnel 

Administration 3 S.H. 

The Principal Organization and Administration 

oj Elementary, Middle, and Secondary School 3 S.H. 

Cases and Concepts in Educational 

Administration 3 S.H. 

Collegial Supervision 3 S.H. 

Dynamics oj Planned Change 3 S.H. 

Principles oj Guidance and Counseling 3 S.H. 

it Educators 

Computer Application in Education 3 S.H. 
Applying Computer Technology in Education 3 S.H. 
Using the Computer as a Tool 

jor Thinking Skills 3 S.H. 

Computers and Writing 3 S.H. 

Seminar in Educational Technology 3 S.H. 

Computers and Writing 3 S.H. 

Arts Technology in the Classroom 3 S.H. 

Diverse Publics and Populations 

EDLM 7520 Planning Projessional Development Programs 3 S.H. 
Schools, Family, Student Partnerships in 

Education 3 S.H. 

Managing Diversity 3 S.H. 

Curriculum Leadership and Evaluation 3 S.H. 
Administration oj Special Education 

Programs 3 S.H. 

Survey oj Special Education 3 S.H. 

Women in Contemporary Society 3 S.H. 

Celebrating Diversity through the Arts 3 S.H. 

Child Abuse and Neglect 3 S.H. 



EDLM 


7030 


EDLM 


8006 


EDLM 


8010 


EDLM 


9000 


EDLM 


9010 


EDLM 


9020 


EDLM 


9100 


PSY 


8200 


Technology 


EDLM 


7000 


EDLM 


7510 


ETEC 


7800 


ETEC 


8600 


ETEC 


9100 


ENGL 


8073 


CRAR 


8146 



EDLM 7530 



EDLM 


7600 


EDLM 


8040 


EDLM 


8800 


SPED 


7000 


IDIS 


9065 


CRAR 


8145 


PSY 


8100 



EDLM 8oio 



Option A— School Principal Core (P-6, 5-8, 9-12) 
Licensure 

Required Courses 

EDLM 8000 Community Relations 

Human Resources and Personal 

Administration 

Law jor the Educator 

Public School Finance 

Curriculum Leadership and Evaluation 

Seminar-. Research in Educational Leadership 3 S.H. 

The Principal. Organization and 

Administration oj the Elementary, 

Middle, and Secondary School 

Collegial Supervision 

Dynamics oj Planned Change 

The Contemporary Educational Leader 

Practicum/Internship in Leadership 

Management or 

or 



EDLM 
EDLM 
EDLM 
EDLM 
EDLM 

EDLM 
EDLM 
EDLM 
EDLM 



8020 
8030 
8040 
8050 
9000 



9020 
9100 
9600 
9110 



3 S.H. 
3 S.H. 

3 S.H. 
3 S.H. 
3 S.H 



3 S.H 
3 S.H 
3 S.H 

3 S.H 

6 S.H. 



EDLM 
EDLM 
EDLM 



9120 
9130 
9140 



or 



Comprehensive Exam 
Total for CACS 



39 S.H 



Option B— Supervisor/ Director (P-12) Licensure 

Required Courses 

EDLM 8000 Community Relations 3 S.H. 
EDLM 8010 Human Resources and Personnel 

Administration 3 S.H. 

EDLM 8020 Law jor the Educator 3 S.H. 

EDLM 8030 Public School Finance 3 S.H. 

EDLM 9020 Collegial Supervision 3 S.H 

EDLM 9100 Dynamics oj Planned Change 3 S.H. 
CRAR 9051 Supervising, Directing and Leading 

in Arts Ed. I 3 S.H. 
CRAR 9052 Supervising, Directing and Leading 

in Arts Ed. II 3 S.H. 

Creative Arts Research 3 S.H. 

Creative Arts Curriculum Development 

and Applications 3 S.H. 

Free Elective or Thesis 3 S.H. 

Practicum/Internship in Leadership 

Management 6 S.H. 

Comprehensive Exam 

Total for CACS 39 S.H. 



CRAR 
CRAR 

EDLM 
EDLM 



9060 
9070 



9500 
9210 




CAGS-Educational Leadership 
and Management: Higher 
Education Administration 

Graduate Program Chair 

Michele Zide, EdD 

Graduate Committee 

Charles Conwy, EdD 
David Harris, PhD 
John Mara, CAGS 
Daniel Nomishan, EdD 

The CAGS in Education Leadership and Management: 
Higher Education Administration is currently under review 
and not accepting students. 

Program Objectives 

The key objectives of the CAGS in Educational Leadership 
and Management: Higher Education Administration 
Program are to prepare and develop students with the 
necessary skills and competencies to administer programs in 
universities, colleges, and junior colleges, to teach and 
conduct research in educational environments of all types,- 
and to provide leaders for higher educational institutions 
and its related professions. 

Program Description 

The CAGS program in Educational Leadership and 
Management: Higher Education Administration is designed 
for students with the desire to: 

• Assume the role of college administrators and policy 
makers, admissions directors, student personnel 
administrators, deans, directors of institutional 
advancement, fund raising at junior colleges, senior 
colleges, and universities. 

• Pursue executive positions in cultural, educational, 
business, government, public policy, and human service 
organizations and agencies. 

• Demonstrate through course work and field-based 
experiences the knowledge, skills, and attitudes that are 
required to lead and manage an educational enterprise 
effectively and efficiently. 

Cohorts and Careers 

The CAGS program is deliberately limited in enrollment and 
to students with interests related to the program areas of 
concentration to assure attention to the student's 
professional needs. Students come from varied academic 
backgrounds and institutional types and usually have some 
experience working in a higher education setting. Each 
entering cohort of students share some common courses and 
experiences. 

Most students enter administrative, analytic or policy 
positions. Their initial work usually is in positions reflecting 
their areas of concentration in settings such as: 

• University, college or community college administration,- 

• Public policy organizations and agencies in postsecondary 
education,- 



• Postsecondary continuing education in higher educational 
institutions, professional association, business or 
government. 

Admissions Standards and Criteria 

To apply for enrollment in the CAGS in Educational 
Leadership and Management program, candidates must 
submit documents as outlined in the Graduate Admissions 
section as well as: 

• Official transcript a of Master's degree from a regionally 
accredited institution 

• MAT/GRE/GMAT exams not required 

Program Requirements 

A minimum of 36 graduate credits is required to complete 
the CAGS program. The program curriculum consists of: 

Three Transition Courses from the general Educational 
Leadership and Management track 

A core of tightly-focused Concentration Courses intended 
to increase the student's knowledge about and understanding 
of the interrelated, societal, institutional, and personal 
dimensions, of higher and postsecondary education. 

An Internship of 300 clock hours to be completed within 
one year, allows each student to link their academic work to 
their own professional development needs. 

Program of Study 

Transition Courses 

The following are the basic courses required of CAGS 

students in the Educational Leadership and Management 

program: 

EDLM 8010 Human Resources 3 S.H. 

EDLM 8020 Law for the Educator 3 S.H. 

EDLM 8050 Seminar: Research in Educational Leadership 3 S.H. 

Concentration Courses 

EDLM 9026 History of Higher Education 3 S.H. 

EDLM 9030 Leadership Theory 3 S.H. 

EDLM 9040 Organizational Issues 3 S.H. 

EDLM 9050 College and University Teaching 3 S.H. 

EDLM 9060 Social Context 3 S.H. 

EDLM 9070 Strategic Planning in Higher Education 3 S.H. 
EDLM 9080 Practicum in Higher Education Administration 6 S.H. 

Elective Course 3 S.H. 



Total for CAGS 



36 S.H. 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



CAGS-Educational Leadership 
and Management: 
Technology Leader 

Graduate Program Chair 

Micbele Zide, EdD 

Graduate Committee 

Charles Conwy, EdD 
David Harris, PhD 
John Mara, CAGS 
Daniel Nomishan, EdD 

Program Objectives 

The CAGS in Educational Leadership and Management: 
Technology Leader Program is a non-licensure program 
designed to provide future leaders in technology for school 
systems. The technology leader degree track provides an in- 
depth examination of the implications of the technology 
revolution that has the potential to transform teaching and 
learning in our schools. Special emphasis is placed on the 
key role that technology leaders have in initiating the 
process of change, technology integration and faculty 
development. The track includes a variety of opportunity for 
hands-on technology-based experiences and includes critical 
core courses in educational leadership and management. 
77ji's track is primarily offered off-campus through a 
collaborative partnership with the Merrimack Education 
Center in Chelmsford. 

Program Description 

The CAGS program in Educational Leadership and 
Management is designed for students with the desire to: 

• Gain competence in the use of software applications as 
productivity and learning tools 

• Develop perspective on their daily work by examining the 
theory and practice of education 

• Create models that incorporate the use of technology to 
support effective teaching and curriculum development 

• Explore the use of instructional technology to address 
contemporary educational issues 

• Understand the implication of "digital literacy" for 
teaching and learning 

• Plan for building and maintaining technology 
infrastructure within a school system. 

Admissions Standards and Criteria 

To apply for enrollment in the CAGS in Educational 
Leadership and Management: Technology Leader Program, 
candidates must submit documents as outlined in the 
Graduate Admissions section as well as: 

• Official transcript a of Master's degree from an accredited 
institution 

• MAT/GRE/GMAT exams not required 

• The MTEL exam is not required for the Technology 
Leader track of the CAGS in Educational Leadership and 
Management. 



Program Requirements 

A minimum of 36 graduate credits is required to complete 
the CAGS program. The program curriculum consists of: 

Program of Study 

Required Core Courses 

EDIM 8005 Foundations of Educational Administration 3 S.H. 
Seminar: Research in Educational Leadership 3 S.H. 



EDIM 
EDIM 
EDIM 
EDIM 



8050 
9100 
9020 
9lXX 



7600 


7700 


7800 


8600 



3 S.H. 


3 S.H 


6 S.H 


is S.H. 


3 S.H. 


3 S.H. 


6 S.H. 


3 S.H. 


3 S.H. 


3 S.H. 


3 S.H. 


3 S.H. 


12 S.H. 


36 S.H. 



Dynamics of Planned Change 
College Supervision 
Practicum/Intemship 
Subtotal 

Required Technology Courses 

ETEC 9200 Project in Educational Technology 

EDIM 9002 Managing Educational Technology 

Infrastructure 

Subtotal 
Choose Four Electives in Consultation with Advisor 
(Samples of Electives) 
ETEC 8 700 Creating Educational Web Sites 

Impact of Technology in Education 

A Graphics Approach to Technology 

Using the Computer as a Research Tool 

Computer and Writing 

Subtotal 

Total for CAGS 



CAGS-Teacher Leadership 

Graduate Program Chair 

TBA 

The CAGS in Teacher Leadership Program is currently 

under review and not accepting students. 

Program Objectives 

The CAGS program in Teacher Leadership is designed to 
provide individuals who are desirous of playing a teacher 
leadership role in partnership with colleagues with the 
necessary collegial orientation and skills to work effectively 
with administrators, colleagues, family and community 
members to improve curriculum and instruction. Specifically, 
the program is designed for teachers who want to remain in 
the classroom, and yet, want to become competent in 
affecting the educational process for which they share 
responsibility. 

Program Description 

CAGS students in Teacher Leadership acquire an orientation 
of collegiality and support while becoming competent in the 
areas of communication, consultation, change facilitation, 
leadership, reflection, problem solving, and evaluation. They 
prepare to accept the role of instructional leader and mentor 
as they engage in research based practices. The course of 
study allows students to: 

• contribute to the creation of an educational environment 
that fosters the development of shared leadership skills 

• foster an educational environment for the development of 
effective teaching and learning skills by assisting fellow 
teachers in applying the pedagogy of effective teaching 

• foster the development of children and young adults' 
critical thinking as a fundamental goal of instruction 

• connect teaching, learning and assessment in a meaningful 
way 



\'ti 






• develop values, skills and strategies for teaching children 
and young adults with diverse backgrounds and strengths 

• Engage and encourage reflective teaching and self analysis 
in others 

• employ exemplary coaching, mentoring supervisory 
competencies 

• assimilate research-based practices into their existing 
repertoires and facilitate their inclusion in others 

• acquire a repertoire of supervisory and observational skills 
that will support teachers in the use of varying styles of 
teaching for improving instruction 

• create and disseminate useful resources for pre-service and 
in-service teachers 

Admissions Standards and Criteria 

To apply for enrollment in the CAGS in Consultation and 
Peer Leadership, a student must submit documents as 
outlined in the Graduate Admissions section as well as: 

• Documentation of a Master's degree from a regionally 
accredited institution 

• An appropriate teaching certificate 

• MAT/GRE/GMAT exams not required 

Program Requirements 

The Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study in 
Consultation and Peer Leadership requires a total of 36 
semester hours as follows: 

• Twenty-seven credit hours required course work in 
Education and Psychology 

• Nine credit hours as electives 



Program of Study 



Required Courses 




EDUO 






SPED 


9010 The Adult Learner 


3S.H. 


PSY 


7020 Group Dynamics 


3 S.H. 


EDLM 


9020 Collegial Supervision 


3 S.H. 


EDLM 


9i00 Dynamics oj Planned Change 


3S.H. 


SPED 


9200 Consultation Strategies 


3 S.H 


EDUO 






SPED 


9250 Educational Strategies 


eS.H. 


EDUO 






SPED 


9350 Internship and Reflective Analysis 


Seminar 6 S.H. 




Electives 


9S.H. 




Total for Certificate 


36 S.H. 



COLLEGE CATALOG 



Master of Arts/Masttr of Arts in Teaching 



i 



Master of Arts in Biology 
Master of Arts in Teaching 
Biology 

Graduate Program Chair 

Christopher Cratsley, PhD 

Graduate Committee 

George Babich, PhD 
Margaret Hoey, PhD 
Howard Thomas, PhD 
Graduate Student Representative 

Program Objectives 

The Master of Arts (MA) in Biology is designed to prepare the 
student for a career in Biology, Environmental Science, or for 
advanced study in these fields. The Master of Arts in Teaching 
(MAT) Biology prepares the candidate for Professional Teacher 
Licensure at the secondary level. 

Program Description 

The MA program in Biology offers a flexible program of 
study with both a thesis and non-thesis track. As students 
progress through the program, they will develop a strong 
scientific philosophy, apply sound scientific thinking to 
analyze biological issues in society, develop skills needed for 
employment within the field of Biology, and expand the 
breadth and depth of scientific knowledge. 

The MAT in Biology provides a balanced curriculum of 
Biology and Education courses to give graduates a strong 
background in content while improving their skills as 
teachers. Students learn to apply a wide range of biological 
knowledge including a bioethical perspective, expand their 
strategies for teaching science to all students, and develop 
critical thinking skills through experimentation and active 
learning in the classroom. 

Admissions Standards and Criteria 

Applicants to the MA/MAT in Biology program must submit 
documents as outlined in the Graduate Admissions section 
as well as: 

• An official transcript of a Bachelor's degree from an 
accredited institution, preferably with (but not limited to) 
a major or minor in biology or an allied discipline and at 
least 2 semesters each of Chemistry, Physics and 
Mathematics 

• The official results of the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) 

Notes: Applicants with inadequate preparation will be required to take 
prerequisite courses prior to admission. 

Students interested in the thesis option should contact a potential graduate 
advisor as part of the application process. 

• Applicants to the MAT in Biology program must submit a 
copy of their initial teaching license. Applicants without 
Initial Licensure may be admitted to the program through 
the post-baccalaureate program and will be required to 
complete additional coursework leading to Initial 
Licensure including 75 hours of pre-practicum experience 
and a 150 hour practicum. 



For more information regarding licensure requirements for 
teacher preparation programs, contact the Teacher 
Certification Office at 978-665- 3239 or visit their web 
site at www.jsc.edu/edcert. 

Program Requirements 

The Masters of Arts in Biology program has a thesis and 
non-thesis track. Each track provides the student with a 
solid investigative core balanced by content course work. 
During the first year each student completes a biology 
seminar during which the student's writing and 
communication skills are evaluated. The thesis committee 
(comprised of the thesis advisor and at least two other 
graduate faculty) helps the student design a series of courses 
(electives) which aid him/her in successfully completing the 
thesis. 

Students in the MAT program complete 18 credits in 
Biology. All MAT students are required to take Bioethics, 
Seminar in Biology, and a series of Biology electives. As part 
of the Biology electives, students must take at least one 
course from each of the following areas chosen in 
consultation with their advisor: 1 ). Ecology and 
Evolutionary Biology, 2). Cellular and Mol